Gray And White Matters.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”
.
Yes, apparently gray and white matters as you will find out in one of today’s selection of unusual facts.
Hope you enjoy the others as well.
.

facts22

.
During the production of the video game Deus Ex,

one of the artists forgot to add

the Twin Towers to New York City.

His mistake was explained by

way of a terrorist attack.

The year was 2000.

Deus_Ex_charity[1]

.

.

Switzerland has

208 mountains over 3,000 meters high

and 24 over 4,000 meters.

switzerland-swiss-flag-on-mannlichen

.

.

The male brain contains more gray matter

whereas the female brain contains more white matter.

White matter basically increases the speed

of transmission of all nerve signals,

which ultimately allows women to process thoughts

more rapidly than their male counterparts.

Don’t fret guys, you’ll get this

in another nano second or two.

female-brain-male-brain

.

.

Genghis Kahn wanted the location

of his grave to be unknown

(somewhere in present day Mongolia)

so his funeral escort killed everyone they met

along the way and he even demanded that

a river be diverted to run across his grave

so it could never be disturbed.

Mongolian river

.

.

Although their civilization has declined and been conquered,

in many rural parts of Mexico and Guatemala

Mayan language and culture perseveres.

In fact, there are an estimated 7 million Maya

still living in and around the Yucatan Peninsula.

Yucatan Peninsula map

.

.

The modern chainsaw was invented  by Scottish

doctors to help with Symphysiotomy.

This is a surgical procedure that widens the

pelvis in order to assist in childbirth.

Symphysiotomy chainsaw

.

.

China is among the countries with

the highest air pollution in the world.

Breathing air in Beijing, the country´s capital,

increases the risk of lung cancer in the same way

as smoking 21 cigarettes a day.

Breathing air in Beijing

.

.

In 1883 Sir Hiram Maxim created the Maxim gun.

The world’s first machine gun would go on to

revolutionize warfare and was used in both World Wars.

Maxim gun

.

.

Some rich people in Moscow buy

ambulances and use them to drive around

because the traffic is so bad.

Volkswagen_T4_ambulance_car,_Moscow,_Russia,_2011

.

.

Operation Mockingbird was a secret campaign

begun in the 1950s by the

Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)

to influence media.

Operation-Mockingbird

.

.

After being frustrated by the service

he was receiving at Bank of America,

Dalton Chiscolm sued them

for $1.7 billion trillion.

During the trial a professor of mathematics

was even called in to testify about

how big the number was.

To give you an idea,

Earth’s total combined GDP was $60 trillion that year.

That is still over 28 million times smaller

than what he was asking for.

Dalton Chiscolm sues Bank of America

.

.

Sean Connery turned down the role of Gandalf

in the Lord of the Rings trilogy,

a decision that cost him $300 million

(he was offered 15% of the film’s profit).

Sean Connery turned down the role of Gandalf

.

=============================

.

No More Quizzes – Not This June Anyway. (Except For This One!)

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Welcome to final fasab quiz for June 2015.

Half the year almost gone, but not before you get the chance to try out these questions.

As usual, if you get stuck, you can find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating.

Enjoy and good luck.

.

Quiz 6

.

Q.  1.  What was bought by the United States from France in 1803?

.

.

Q.  2. ‘Black’, ‘Hooper’ and ‘Bewick’ are all types of what bird?

.

.

Q.  3.  What city in South America is known as ‘The City Of The Kings’ ?

.

.

Q.  4.  Very recently in the news for all the wrong reasons, what organization do the letters ‘FIFA’ represent?

.

.

Q.  5.  Who was the leader of the Soviet Union from the mid-1920s until his death in 1953?

.

.

Q.  6.   What did Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen discover by accident on November 8 1895?

.

.

Q.  7.  He was born in Illinois and died in Idaho and during his lifetime he published seven novels, six short story collections, and two non-fiction works, and was awarded a Pulitzer Prize and the Nobel Prize for Literature. Many of his works are considered classics of American literature. Who was he?

.

.

Q.  8.  What name is given to calfskin, dressed and prepared for writing on?

.

.

Q.  9.  Which sea is sometimes called the Euxine Sea?

.

.

Q. 10.  What is the name given to the person who is appointed the chief lawyer of the U.S. government?

.

.

Q. 11.  Name the famous Russian ballet dancer who changed the face of modern ballet?

.

.

Q. 12.  Who invented the rabies vaccination?

.

.

Q. 13.  Who is the current (2015) British Prime Minister?

.

.

Q. 14. Big points opportunity. How many countries lie between Canada and Colombia? (A point for the correct number and a bonus point for each one you can name correctly.)

.

.

Q. 15.  What fruit is ‘Calvados’ distilled from?

.

.

Q. 16.  What is ‘Scooby’ short for in the name ‘Scooby Doo’ ?

.

.

Q. 17.  What does ‘RADAR’ stand for?

.

.

Q. 18.  In which French city was Joan of Arc put to death?

.

.

Q. 19. What are the seven most popular sports in America? (A point for each correct answer and a bonus point if you can name them in the correct order.)

.

.

Q. 20.  He was famous as ‘Dracula’, ‘Scaramanga’ and ‘Saruman’. Who was he?

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

ANWERS

.

Q.  1.  What was bought by the United States from France in 1803?

A.  1.  The Louisiana territory (828,000 square miles).

.

.

Q.  2. ‘Black’, ‘Hooper’ and ‘Bewick’ are all types of what bird?

A.  2. Swans.

.

.

Q.  3.  What city in South America is known as ‘The City Of The Kings’ ?

A.  3.  Lima, Peru. (Ciudad de los Reyes)

.

.

Q.  4.  Very recently in the news for all the wrong reasons, what organization do the letters ‘FIFA’ represent?

A.  4.  The Fédération Internationale de Football Association, the international governing body of association football, futsal and beach soccer.

.

.

Q.  5.  Who was the leader of the Soviet Union from the mid-1920s until his death in 1953?

A.  5.  Joseph Stalin.

.

.

Q.  6.   What did Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen discover by accident on November 8 1895?

A.  6.  X-rays.

.

.

Q.  7.  He was born in Illinois and died in Idaho and during his lifetime he published seven novels, six short story collections, and two non-fiction works, and was awarded a Pulitzer Prize and the Nobel Prize for Literature. Many of his works are considered classics of American literature. Who was he?

A.  7.  Ernest Hemmingway.

.

.

Q.  8.  What name is given to calfskin, dressed and prepared for writing on?

A.  8.  It is known as ‘Vellum’.

.

.

Q.  9.  Which sea is sometimes called the Euxine Sea?

A.  9.  The Black Sea.

.

.

Q. 10.  What is the name given to the person who is appointed the chief lawyer of the U.S. government?

A. 10.  He/she is known  as the ‘Attorney General’.

.

.

Q. 11.  Name the famous Russian ballet dancer who changed the face of modern ballet?

A. 11.  Rudolf Nureyev.

.

.

Q. 12.  Who invented the rabies vaccination?

A. 12.  Louis Pasteur.

.

.

Q. 13.  Who is the current (2015) British Prime Minister?

A. 13.  David Cameron.

.

.

Q. 14. Big points opportunity. How many countries lie between Canada and Colombia? (A point for the correct number and a bonus point for each one you can name correctly.)

A. 14.  There are 9 countries that lie between Canada and Colombia – they are The United States, Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama.

.

.

Q. 15.  What fruit is ‘Calvados’ distilled from?

A. 15.  Apples.

.

.

Q. 16.  What is ‘Scooby’ short for in the name ‘Scooby Doo’ ?

A. 16.  Scoobert.

.

.

Q. 17.  What does ‘RADAR’ stand for?

A. 17.  ‘RADAR’ stand for ‘Radio Detection and Ranging’.

.

.

Q. 18.  In which French city was Joan of Arc put to death?

A. 18.  Rouen.

.

.

Q. 19. What are the seven most popular sports in America? (A point for each correct answer and a bonus point if you can name them in the correct order.)

A. 19.  1.  American Football     2. Baseball     3. Basketball     4. Ice Hockey    5. Soccer    6. Tennis    and    7. Golf

.

.

Q. 20.  He was famous as ‘Dracula’, ‘Scaramanga’ and ‘Saruman’. Who was he?

A. 20.  He was the wonderful actor Sir Christopher Lee.

.

.

======================================

.

To Cut A Long Story Short Use Fewer Words.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

But make sure a few of those words are puns.

Which is my way of welcoming you to another pun day.

Enjoy or endure!!

.

rofl

.

A little birdie told me my

golf skills were improving.

 birdie

.

.

Someone asked me how many haircuts I’d had in my life.

I said, “off the top of my head, about 250.”

 haircuts

.

.

I used to file my nails, but I thought:

‘what’s the point in keeping them?’

 file cabinet

.

.

Maths problems, the only place where

someone can buy 60 watermelons

and no one wonders why.

 watermelons

.

.

I’m not going to make jokes from mixed metaphors

– too many other people have milked that bandwagon already.

 mixed metaphors

.

.

I was recently asked if as a young boy,

was my mother very strict with me.

I said, ‘let me get one thing straight,

my mother was never a young boy.’

 mother clipart

.

.

Whilst holidaying in Madrid with the lads,

my friend Dave suffered a heart attack in a bar,

however we were all surprised when he was

skillfully revived by a retired Doctor

who appeared out of nowhere…

… No one expects the Spanish Ex-Physician.

 Spanish Inquisition Monty Python

.

.

Met this girl in a club last night.

I said, “Do you like cocktails?”

She said, “I don’t know, tell me one.”

 cocktails

.

.

I said to my friend, “It’s important that no-one

mentions any film production companies.”

“How important is it?” he asked.

“Paramount,” I replied.

 Paramount_Pictures_print_logo_(1968)

.

.

I met the bloke who invented crosswords today.

I can’t remember his name.

It’s P something T something R.

 crossword compiler

.

.

My agent said I should use a pen name,

so from now on I am calling myself

‘Bic Parker’.

 pen name

.

.

Thanks to Gwen Stefani,

I can now spell Bananas.

.

.

============================

.

People Who Have Bluetooth Handsets Need A Clip Round The Ear.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

I’m tempted to say that you need a clip round the ear if you don’t like puns, but I know you do.

Why else would you be here?

Unless it’s for pun-ishment.

Enjoy or endure!!

.

rofl

.

Why are photographers always so depressed?

Because they always focus on the negatives.

 photographers

.

.

I bought a flea circus yesterday,

but one of them won’t go on the high wire.

It’s a nervous tick.

 flea circus

.

.

I played in a football match

that ended in a 2-2 draw.

No 1-1

 football match

.

.

I don’t mind doing crosswords,

but dot to dot puzzles are where I draw the line.

 crosswords

.

.

What do you call it when a prisoner

falls from the top of a building?

Condescending.

 prisoner

.

.

I invented the upside down house.

It’s now a top cellar.

 upside down house

.

.

To neigh or not to neigh.

That is equestrian.

 equestrian

.

.

Support your local

search and rescue squad.

Get lost

 search and rescue

.

.

Why did the Mafia boss cross the road?

Revenge!

The road had crossed him the week before.

 Mafia boss

.

.

My uncle slipped on some beans last week.

If only he had the benefit of Heinz sight.

 baked beans

.

.

I took my dog to a car showroom today.

I turned to him and said,

“They have an interesting Range Rover.”

 Range Rover car showroom

.

.

If you lined up all the cars in the world end to end,

someone would be stupid enough to try to pass them,

five or six at a time, on a hill, in the fog.

queue of cars

.

=================================

.

Some Baby Facts Included Today.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Yes, baby facts and a lot of grown up facts too in this selection.

Hope you find something of interest.

Enjoy.

.

did you know2

.

In spite of their crying sounds,

babies tears don’t begin to flow until they

are around 4 to 13 weeks old.

 baby crying

.

.

Anne Parrish, an American writer was browsing

in a Paris bookstore one day when she came across

a book called, ‘Jack Frost and Other Stories’.

She began to tell her husband how she loved

the book when she was a child.

He took the book, opened it,

and inside the cover were written the words

“Anne Parish, 209 N Weber Street, Colorado”.

 Anne_Parrish,_children's_author,_head_shot

.

.

The Titanic had its own newspaper

called The Atlantic Daily Bulletin.

 The Atlantic Daily Bulletin

.

.

The term ‘Geek’ first showed up in northern Britain

in 1876, when it was used to refer to a fool.

Americans tweaked the meaning and by 1957 it meant

‘an unsociable and over-diligent student’.

Of course, once computers turned up in the 80’s,

‘geek’ took on a second meaning as

‘an expert in computers or science’.

 Bill_Gates_Paul_Allen_1981

.

.

The first modern lighter was invented by

German chemist Johann Wolfgang Dobereiner in 1823,

three years BEFORE the match was invented

by John Walker in England.

 Johann Wolfgang Dobereiner

.

.

One of the most iconic military vehicles of all time has to

be the Willys MB Jeep, manufactured from 1941 to 1945.

This small four-wheel drive utility vehicle has

a maximum speed of up to 65 mph (105 km/h)

and an operational range of 300 miles (almost 500 km).

It was used by several countries in WWII,

including the US, UK, France and the Soviet Union.

 Willys MB Jeep

.

.

Technically Europe is not a continent,

it’s separation from Asia was actually a Greek idea.

 Europe map

.

.

While filming Lord of the Rings

in the mountains of New Zealand,

Sean Bean refused a helicopter ride to a set

that was high in the mountains

due to his fear of flying.

He instead hiked up to the set

in his full Boromir armor

every day that they shot up there.

 boromir

.

.

In Indonesia the government has restricted some

lanes of traffic to only cars with 3 or more people

to try to cut down overcrowding on the roads.

Some poor people from the city outskirts

take advantage of this law by offering drivers a

Professional Hitchhiker service,

so they can drive in the fast lanes.

 Indonesia traffic jam

.

.

Genghis Khan believed that a man could be measured

by the number of children he fathered

and consequently his harem included thousands of

women with whom he had a great many children.

So many, in fact, that geneticists have found

that roughly 8% of men in Asia carry his genetic legacy

in their Y-chromosome.

 Genghis Khan  descendents map

.

.

127,000 trees are chopped down every day

in order to keep up with the global demand

for toilet paper.

Holy S***!!!

 toilet paper

.

.

The original ER movie was to be directed

by Steven Spielberg until he became more interested

in another of Crichton’s projects: Jurassic Park.

Spielberg Jurassic Park

.

================================

.

Land Yourself A Lot Of Points In Today’s Quiz!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Yes, there is the opportunity to land yourself with a lot of points in today’s quiz, but some of the questions are quite difficult too so don’t be over confidant.

However, don’t worry, if you get stuck you can always find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating!

Enjoy and good luck.

.

Quiz 07

.

Q.  1:  How many legs has a tarantula?

.

.

Q.  2:  ‘Zn’ is the symbol of which chemical element?

.

.

Q.  3:  What name is given to a baby elephant?

.

.

Q.  4:  What is the smallest bone in the body and where is it located? (A point for each correct answer.)

.

.

Q.  5:  What is the fahrenheit equivalent of 20 degrees centigrade?

.

.

Q.  6:  What city is known as ‘The City of Lilies’ ?

.

.

Q.  7:  Who was famous for his theory of gravity and 3 laws of motion?

.

.

Q.  8:  What is the most common transplant operation?

.

.

Q.  9:  What is the major element of the diet of the Koala bear?

.

.

Q. 10:  And in a related question, what is the major element of the diet of the wild giant panda?

.

.

Q. 11:  Which gas is responsible for global warming?

.

.

Q. 12:  The Ross and Weddell Seas are to be found off the shore of which continent?

.

.

Q. 13:  Now for a mega-point question. Listed below (in alphabetical order) are ten countries ending in the word ‘land’. A point for each one you can name correctly.

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _   _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _   _ _ _ _ _ _ L A N D _

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ L A N D

.

.

Q. 14:  Who led the Seventh Cavalry to its doom at the Battle of Little Bighorn?

.

.

Q. 15:  John Flamsteed was the first holder of which far-sighted post, created in 1675?

.

.

Q. 16:  What term is given to the technique where paint is mixed and bound with egg yolk?

.

.

Q. 17:  What was launched by Pope Urban II at the Council of Clermont in 1095?

.

.

Q. 18:  Who went on a circumnavigation of the world from the Reform Club as the result of a bet?

.

.

Q. 19:  Which New Zealand-born physicist is credited with splitting the atom?

.

.

Q. 20:  Which motoring aid was invented by Percy Shaw?

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

ANSWERS

.

Q.  1:  How many legs has a tarantula?

A.  1:  Eight.

.

.

Q.  2:  ‘Zn’ is the symbol of which chemical element?

A.  2:  Zinc.

.

.

Q.  3:  What name is given to a baby elephant?

A.  3:  A baby elephant is called a ‘Calf’.

.

.

Q.  4:  What is the smallest bone in the body and where is it located? (A point for each correct answer.)

A.  4:  It is called the ‘Stirrup’ and it is located in the ear.

.

.

Q.  5:  What is the fahrenheit equivalent of 20 degrees centigrade?

A.  5:  20 degrees centigrade is 68 degrees Fahrenheit.

.

.

Q.  6:  What city is known as ‘The City of Lilies’ ?

A.  6:  Florence.

.

.

Q.  7:  Who was famous for his theory of gravity and 3 laws of motion?

A.  7:  Sir Isaac Newton.

.

.

Q.  8:  What is the most common transplant operation?

A.  8:  The Bone graft.

.

.

Q.  9:  What is the major element of the diet of the Koala bear?

A.  9:  Eucalyptus leaves.

.

.

Q. 10:  And in a related question, what is the major element of the diet of the wild giant panda?

A. 10:  A wild giant panda’s diet is almost exclusively (99 percent) bamboo.

.

.

Q. 11:  Which gas is responsible for global warming?

A. 11:  Carbon dioxide.

.

.

Q. 12:  The Ross and Weddell Seas are to be found off the shore of which continent?

A. 12:  Antarctica.

.

.

Q. 13:  Now for a mega-point question. Listed below (in alphabetical order) are ten countries ending in the word ‘land’. A point for each one you can name correctly.

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _   _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _   _ _ _ _ _ _ L A N D _

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ L A N D

A. 13:  The correct answers are:

            FINLAND

            ICELAND

            IRELAND

            NORTHERN IRELAND

            NEW ZEALAND

            THE NETHERLANDS

            POLAND

            SWAZILAND

            SWITZERLAND

            THAILAND.

.

.

Q. 14:  Who led the Seventh Cavalry to its doom at the Battle of Little Bighorn?

A. 14:  Lt-Col George Armstrong Custer.

.

.

Q. 15:  John Flamsteed was the first holder of which far-sighted post, created in 1675?

A. 15:  He was the first Astronomer Royal.

.

.

Q. 16:  What term is given to the technique where paint is mixed and bound with egg yolk?

A. 16:  It is known as ‘Tempera’.

.

.

Q. 17:  What was launched by Pope Urban II at the Council of Clermont in 1095?

A. 17:  The First Crusade.

.

.

Q. 18:  Who went on a circumnavigation of the world from the Reform Club as the result of a bet?

A. 18:  Phileas Fogg and his servant Passepartout (you get the point for naming Phileas Fogg correctly AND two posssible bonus points if you also knew the name of his servant. (From Jules Verne’s Around the World in Eighty Days).

.

.

Q. 19:  Which New Zealand-born physicist is credited with splitting the atom?

A. 19:  Sir Ernest Rutherford.

.

.

Q. 20:  Which motoring aid was invented by Percy Shaw?

A. 20:  He invented the reflectors known as ‘Cats eyes’, getting his inspiration when he saw a light reflecting off a cat’s eyes as it walked towards him. (British comedian Ken Dodd said that if the cat had been walking away from him he would probably have invented the pencil sharpener!)

.

==================================

.