People Who Have Bluetooth Handsets Need A Clip Round The Ear.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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I’m tempted to say that you need a clip round the ear if you don’t like puns, but I know you do.

Why else would you be here?

Unless it’s for pun-ishment.

Enjoy or endure!!

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rofl

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Why are photographers always so depressed?

Because they always focus on the negatives.

 photographers

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I bought a flea circus yesterday,

but one of them won’t go on the high wire.

It’s a nervous tick.

 flea circus

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I played in a football match

that ended in a 2-2 draw.

No 1-1

 football match

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I don’t mind doing crosswords,

but dot to dot puzzles are where I draw the line.

 crosswords

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What do you call it when a prisoner

falls from the top of a building?

Condescending.

 prisoner

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I invented the upside down house.

It’s now a top cellar.

 upside down house

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To neigh or not to neigh.

That is equestrian.

 equestrian

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Support your local

search and rescue squad.

Get lost

 search and rescue

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Why did the Mafia boss cross the road?

Revenge!

The road had crossed him the week before.

 Mafia boss

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My uncle slipped on some beans last week.

If only he had the benefit of Heinz sight.

 baked beans

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I took my dog to a car showroom today.

I turned to him and said,

“They have an interesting Range Rover.”

 Range Rover car showroom

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If you lined up all the cars in the world end to end,

someone would be stupid enough to try to pass them,

five or six at a time, on a hill, in the fog.

queue of cars

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Popocatépetl. What Else Can You Say, It’s Quiz Day!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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Popocatépetl indeed. Good luck if you can pronounce it let alone answer the question about it.

But don’t let that put you off. There are a lot more easier questions than that in today’s quiz. And of course a few harder ones just to make it a little bit challenging.

As usual, if you get stuck, you can find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating!

Enjoy and good luck.

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quiz 10

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Q.  1:  Which novelist wrote ‘Cannery Row’ and ‘East of Eden’ ?

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Q.  2:  In which sport do you have to navigate on foot to a series of control points?

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Q.  3:  What African city is known as the ‘Mother of the World’ ?

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Q.  4:  In medieval times, what was an ‘Estampie’ ?

 

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Q.  5:  What is the home of a squirrel called?

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Q.  6:  Which fifth-century barbarian leader was nicknamed ‘the scourge of God’ ?

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Q.  7:  In which country can you find the volcano of Popocatépetl?

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Q.  8:  What number is at the 9 o’clock position on a dartboard?

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Q.  9:  What was ‘Mr Blandings’ doing in 1948 that turned into a ‘Money Pit’ for Tom Hanks in 1986?

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Q. 10:  George Stubbs is best-known for his paintings of which animals?

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Q. 11:  Who is the Greek Goddess of love?

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Q. 12:  What shapes are attached to a line of a weather map to denote a warm front?

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Q. 13:  Deriving its name from an Icelandic word meaning erupt, what term is given to a natural hot spring that intermittently ejects a column of water and steam into the air?

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Q. 14:  What is the name given to the substance that covers a deer’s antler when it is growing?

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Q. 15:  Which word goes before vest, beans and quartet?

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Q. 16:  Which part of a horse’s anatomy is the equivalent of a human ankle?

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Q. 17:  Appointed in 1721, who is held to be the first man to be Prime Minister of the UK?

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Q. 18:  Who played ‘Neo’ in ‘The Matrix’

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Q. 19:  What is sushi traditionally wrapped in?

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Q. 20:  What was the first name of Agatha Christie’s ‘Miss Marple’ ?

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ANSWERS

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Q.  1:  Which novelist wrote ‘Cannery Row’ and ‘East of Eden’ ?

A.  1:  John Steinbeck.

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Q.  2:  In which sport do you have to navigate on foot to a series of control points?

A.  2:  Orienteering.

.

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Q.  3:  What African city is known as the ‘Mother of the World’ ?

A.  3:  Cairo.

.

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Q.  4:  In medieval times, what was an ‘Estampie’ ?

A.  4:  A dance and the music to accompany it.

.

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Q.  5:  What is the home of a squirrel called?

A.  5:  A Drey.

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Q.  6:  Which fifth-century barbarian leader was nicknamed ‘the scourge of God’ ?

A.  6:  Attila the Hun.

.

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Q.  7:  In which country can you find the volcano of Popocatépetl?

A.  7:  Mexico.

.

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Q.  8:  What number is at the 9 o’clock position on a dartboard?

A.  8:  11.

.

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Q.  9:  What was ‘Mr Blandings’ doing in 1948 that turned into a ‘Money Pit’ for Tom Hanks in 1986?

A.  9: Building his Dream House. The original 1948 movie starring Cary Grant called ‘Mr Blandings Builds His Dream House’ was remade in 1986 as ‘The Money Pit’ starring Tom Hanks.

.

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Q. 10:  George Stubbs is best-known for his paintings of which animals?

A. 10:  Horses.

.

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Q. 11:  Who is the Greek Goddess of love?

A. 11:  Aphrodite.

.

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Q. 12:  What shapes are attached to a line of a weather map to denote a warm front?

A. 12:  Semicircles.

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Q. 13:  Deriving its name from an Icelandic word meaning erupt, what term is given to a natural hot spring that intermittently ejects a column of water and steam into the air?

A. 13:  Geyser.

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Q. 14:  What is the name given to the substance that covers a deer’s antler when it is growing?

A. 14:  Velvet.

.

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Q. 15:  Which word goes before vest, beans and quartet?

A. 15:  String.

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Q. 16:  Which part of a horse’s anatomy is the equivalent of a human ankle?

A. 16:  Fetlock.

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Q. 17:  Appointed in 1721, who is held to be the first man to be Prime Minister of the UK?

A. 17:  Sir Robert Walpole.

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Q. 18:  Who played ‘Neo’ in ‘The Matrix’

A. 18:  Keanu Reeves.

.

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Q. 19:  What is sushi traditionally wrapped in?

A. 19:  Edible seaweed.

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Q. 20:  What was the first name of Agatha Christie’s ‘Miss Marple’ ?

A. 20:  Jane.

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Did You Know? Another Fact Finding Mission Is Underway!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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Another fact finding mission has been undertaken on your behalf and here are this week’s results.

The usual random mixture, so hopefully something interesting will be in there for you.

Enjoy.

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did you know2

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Cashews are actually a fleshy fruit.

The nut that we eat is the seed that

grows on the outside of the fruit.

cashews

.

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There have been 14 vice presidents who have

become President of the United States.

vice-president-of-the-us-seal-plaque

.

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Thamsanqa Jantjie, the embarrassing sign language interpreter

at the Mandela Memorial who doesn’t know any sign language,

is also alleged to be a murderer.

He was among a group of people who accosted two men found

with a stolen television and burned them to death

by setting fire to tires placed around their necks.

Thamsanqa-Jantjie

.

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Outside North and South America,

the only alligators found in the wild are in China.

alligator

.

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Thomas Edison was a great inventor,

but not so good at putting his inventions into practical business use.

For example, despite having the contract to supply cement

for the original Yankee Stadium,

the Edison Portland Cement Company went bust

because it insisted on producing concrete everything,

including cabinets, pianos, and even entire houses!

Yankee Stadium

.

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Gureng-gureng, Gabi-Gabi, Waga-Waga, Wemba-Wemba, and Yitha-Yitha

are all names of native Australian languages.

Gurindji-yurrk

.

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Some Americans disagreed with the United States’ initial refusal

to enter WWI and so they joined the French Foreign Legion

or the British or Canadian armies.

A group of U.S. pilots formed the Lafayette Escadrille,

which was part of the French air force and became

one of the top fighting units on the Western Front.

Escadrille Lafayette Banner

.

.

The horse race normally called the Belmont Stakes

also goes by name of the Run for the Carnations.

Belmont Stakes

.

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Golf legend Jack Nicklaus didn’t earn his nickname,

the Golden Bear,

because of his size, his demeanor, or his hair.

It was the name of his high school mascot.

david-okeefe-golden-bear-2

.

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The term “Continental breakfast” was coined to

differentiate itself from an English breakfast.

The fried eggs, bacon, and beans of an English morning

are quite distinct from the dainty pastries, coffee, and juice

offered throughout the rest of Europe.

English Continental Breakfasts

.

.

Beowulf is the longest Old English manuscript in existence

and contains about a tenth of all known Anglo-Saxon poetry.

beowulf

.

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After Leonardo da Vinci’s death,

King Francis I of France hung the Mona Lisa in his bathroom.

(There’s critics everywhere!)

mona-lisa-article-english

.

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One type of hummingbird weighs less than a penny.

hummingbird

.

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The letter “J” was the last letter added to the English Alphabet.

Before that, the letter “L” was used in its place.

“U” was the second to last letter added,

and was usually replaced by V.

old-english-alphabet

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Norman Mailer coined the word “factoid” in his 1973 biography Marilyn,

BUT it wasn’t just another word for “trivia”

– he actually meant something that seems like a fact but isn’t actually factual

– and that’s a fact….. or a factoid…. or…. er.

quote-factoids-that-is-facts-which-have-no-existence-before-appearing-in-a-magazine-or-newspaper-norman-mailer

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Did You Know? It’s Fascinating Fact day.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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It’s another “Did You Know” day on the fasab blog.

More random facts to get your head around.

Enjoy.

.

did you know4

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The first Dunkin Donuts and the first Howard Johnson’s

were both in Quincy, Massachusetts.

Dunkin Donuts

.

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The Pennsylvania Dutch are not really Dutch.

They are a people of German ancestry living in

southeastern Pennsylvania, primarily in Lancaster County.

“German” in German is “Deutsch.”

Pennsylvania Dutch

.

.

The Gateway Arch in St. Louis

is as wide at its base as it is tall (630 feet).

Gateway Arch dimensions

.

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Ohio State offers a course called “Sports for the Spectator.”

Students are taught how to be

“an informed and appreciative sports spectator.”

obama-ohio-state-2

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Telephone cards first took off in Hawaii,

since long-distance charges from the far-flung state

were higher than anywhere else in the country.

prepaid-phone-cards

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What day were you born on?

Apparently Tuesday is the most popular day of the week for giving birth,

a fact that has nothing to do with Nature

and everything to do with hospital staffing;

elective C-sections and induced labors

are often scheduled during traditional working hours.

Calendar

.

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The majority of the text in the Monroe Doctrine

was actually penned by John Quincy Adams.

The Monroe Doctrine

.

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Despite its reputation as a cosmonaut staple,

freeze-dried ice cream only made one mission to space.

In 1968, it provided instant sugar rushes to the astronauts of Apollo 7.

astronaut_icecream

.

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In car design circles, a hood ornament is properly called a “mascot.”

The first American automobile to sport a mascot was the 1912 Cadillac.

1912_Cadillac

.

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Albert Einstein never received a Nobel Prize

for his theory of relativity.

Pigeon Books Albert Einstein Relativity

.

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On November 18th, 1913, pilot Lincoln Beachey was the

first person to make a complete loop-de-loop in an airplane.

Lincoln_Beachey_in_his_plane

.

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The first man to appear on the cover of Playboy

was the actor Peter Sellers.

sellers_playboy_cover_april_64

.

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West Virginia is no longer the coal-mining capital of the U.S.,

nine of the ten top-producing coal mines are currently located in Wyoming.

open cast coal mine

.

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The popular game Bingo was originally called “Beano”

because players used beans to cover the numbered squares.

Bingo

.

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Cruise control and automatic transmissions were invented

by a blind engineer named Ralph Teetor.

Ralph Teetor

.

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Modern scholars believe that Jericho,

settled around 10,000 years ago,

was the first walled city in the world.

jericho_walls_wide_view

.

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The human bone most often broken is the clavicle (collar bone).

clavicle

.

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Swearing to tell

“the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth”

dates back to English Common Law.

Interestingly enough, there were no penalties for perjury until the 1600s;

prior to that time, it was believed that the fear of God’s wrath

was enough to keep witnesses honest.

The truth the whole truth

.

.

According to doctors, humans have an average

of 14 episodes of flatulence per day.

(I always knew I was above average!)

humorous-fish-farting-animation-flatulence-comedy-animated-picture

.

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The Harlem Globetotters were originally a Chicago based team (1927).

They did not play a game in Harlem until the 1960s.

.

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Silly Named Game Two.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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Last week’s post was a selection of towns that had been given names that, to put it mildly, left a lot to be desired.

Today is part two of what I have called the Silly Named Game with another selection of towns that you wouldn’t really want to have as your address if you didn’t have to.

I should say that the whole idea came to me when I was remembering the time I spent doing some business in Nevada. While there we came across a town called Pahrump (you can read more about it here if you are interested http://www.pahrumpnv.org/ ) and both my colleague and myself thought the name quite unusual.

He said to me, “I wonder why they called the town that?”

I must have been in good form that day because I was able to tell him straight off, “Oh, I know the answer to that.”

“Go on then,” he said. “Tell me.”

“Well,” I began. “This is cowboy country and one day, way back when, a couple of good ole boys were riding, one slightly behind the other, through the desert and came across this piece of land.”

“This here would make a good place to settle,” the first cowboy said.

“Sure would,” agreed the other.

“What do you reckon we should call it?” the cowboy in front asked  –  and as he did so the guy behind him raised a hip a let go with a rather loud fart.

“Pahrump?” the first cowboy questioned, thinking that was what he had heard the other one say. “Well, I guess it’s as good a name as any.”

“And that’s how the town became known as Pahrump,” I told my colleague.

I’d be the first to admit that it’s not the official explanation of how the town was named, but it’s a better version as far as I’m concerned and a warning to one and all never to name a town when all you have had to eat for a week is beef jerky and beans.

But enough of that.

Here is today’s selection of the Silly Named Game.

Enjoy!

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Silly place names - Crotch Crescent

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Silly place names - Crapstone

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Silly place names - Intercourse

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Silly place names - Fucking

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Silly place names - Boring

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Silly place names - Accident

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Silly place names - Wetwang

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Silly place names - Hell

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Silly place names - Hooker

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Silly place names - Embarrass

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Silly place names - Bird-In-Hand

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Silly place names - Titty-Ho

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Did You Know? The Facts Are Here!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

The facts are certainly here.

It’s up to you to choose how valuable and interesting they are.

Apart from anything else I hope you enjoy reading them.

.

did you know1

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To save money when you shop, don’t touch anything.

Touching an item makes you more likely to buy it, and willing to pay more.

http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,1889081,00.html

did you know touching

.

.

The famous US Pony Express only lasted a single year

before the transcontinental telegraph made the route obsolete.

did you know pony express

.

.

In a 2008 survey,

58% of British teens thought Sherlock Holmes was a real guy,

while 20% thought Winston Churchill was not.

did you know churchill-holmes

.

.

Before his writing career took off, Dan Brown was a singer/songwriter.

His second album was titled Angels & Demons.

did you know angelsdemons

.

.

During a 1956 speech for his campaign of de-Stalinization,

Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev was asked by an unseen audience member why,

as an advisor to the dictator, he had never stopped Stalin from committing his atrocities.

Khrushchev immediately lashed out, “Who said that?”

The room grew quiet.

Khrushchev repeated his query to more silence, waited a beat,

and then said, “Well, now you understand why.”

did you know Khrushchev

.

.

The first US President to earn a PhD was Woodrow Wilson.

did you know Woodrow Wilson

.

.

The U.K.’s police headquarters, Scotland Yard,

is not (and never was) located in Scotland.

Scotland Yard was originally a palace

where Scottish royalty stayed when visiting London.

did you know New_Scotland_Yard_sign

.

.

Wendy’s founder, Dave Thomas,

used to work for Kentucky Fried Chicken.

did you know Dave Thomas Wendy's

.

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The first VCR, developed by the Ampex Corporation in 1956,

weighed nearly 1,500 lbs.

It took another 15 years before a commercially viable product hit the scene.

did you know ampex-commercial-vtr-1956

.

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The Vatican Bank is the world’s only bank

that allows ATM users to perform transactions in Latin.

did you know ATM-Latin

.

.

The municipal government of Paris passed a resolution

to prohibit Tom Cruise from becoming an honorary citizen of the city.

For them it was ‘une mission impossible!’

did you know Tom Cruise Mission_Impossible_II_(MI2)

.

.

Only one U.S. coin

— the zinc-coated steel penny produced during World War II —

can be picked up by a magnet.

did you know WWII steel penny

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.

During the Vietnam War, the Viet Cong hid IEDs in empty soda cans

because they observed that US Soldiers enjoyed kicking empty cans

while marching down the road.

Warning to the politicians perhaps who recently

have done little else but kick the can down the road.

did you know kicking-the-can-down-the-road

.

.

Simon Bolivar is the only person in the world

to have two sovereign nations named after him:

Bolivia

and

Venezuela

(the country’s full name is Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela).

did you know bolivar

.

.

At the 1960 Winter Olympic Games,

Walt Disney was Chairman of the Pageantry Committee

that was responsible for producing both

the opening and closing ceremonies.

did you know walt_olympics

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Butterflies range in size from a tiny 1/8 inch to a huge almost 12 inches.

did you know butterfly

.

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After racking up a $40 late fee on a VHS copy of Apollo 13,

Reed Hastings was inspired to start Netflix

did you know Netflix-CEO-Reed-Hastings

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Banging your head against a wall uses 150 calories an hour.

did you know bang-head-here

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.

The most Academy Awards (Oscars) won by a woman was eight,

by Edith Head, all for Costume Design

did you know the-much-honored-costume-designer-edith-head-1954

.

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Black-eyed peas aren’t peas, but beans,

and also a famous American hip hop group.

And coffee beans aren’t beans, but seeds.

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Coffee Anyone?

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

 .

If you are a regular reader of this blog you will have realised that I like facts about various subjects.

One of them is food.

I have already done a post about peanut butter (click here) and one about chocolate (click here) , both everyday items that almost all of use and enjoy. ‘

Today’s post is about probably THE most loved and enjoyed drink that we use everyday.

So here we have lots and lots of things you probably never knew about you coffee.

Enjoy (with a nice cup of coffee or three perhaps).

 .

Coffee Bean Man

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 .

According to legend during the 9th century Ethopian shepherds first noticed the effects of caffeine when they saw their goats appearing to become frisky and ‘dance’ after eating coffee berries.

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Originally coffee was eaten.

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 .

African tribes mixed coffee berries with fat to make energy balls

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 .

Coffee has been used as a beverage for over 700 years.

 .

 .

The rise of Islam contributed greatly to the popularilty of coffee. The religion prohibited drinking alcohol, but coffee was considered an acceptable drink

 .

 .

In Turkey, the bridegroom as once required to make a vow during the wedding to always make sure to provide their wives with coffee. If they did not do so it was considered grounds for divorce.

 .

 .

Also in Turkey, the intended bride is required to serve coffee to her parents and future husband when he comes to ask for her hand in marriage; however, she has no say so in the outcome of the request. Tradition has it that her response is in the sweetness or lack thereof of the coffee. Sweet coffee supposedly means she is okay with the arrangement while salty means she is not.

 .

 .

All the coffee grown in the world grows in the bean belt which is the area between the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn

 .

 .

Hawaii is the only state in the US that grows coffee

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 .

The heavy tea tax imposed on the American colonies in 1773, which caused the ‘Boston Tea Party’, resulted in America switching from tea to coffee. Drinking coffee became an expression of freedom.

 .

 .

Black coffee with no sugar contains no calories.

 .

 .

Drinking a single cup of coffee that has been brewing for 20 minutes provides the body with 300 phytochemicals which act as antioxidants and stay in the body for up to a month.

 .

 .

New Yorkers drink almost seven times more coffee than other cities in the US.

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 .

Coffee is a psychoactive. And at high doses it can make you see things… It can also kill you…The lethal dose of caffeine is roughly 100 cups of coffee.

 .

 .

The French philosopher Voltaire is said to have drank 50 cups of coffee a day.

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 .

In 1675 Charles II, King of England issued a proclamation banning Coffee Houses. He said that they were places where people met to plot against him.

 coffee house.

 .

Coffee is the second most traded commodity on earth, after oil.

 .

 .

70% of the world consumes Arabica coffee, which is mild and aromatic. The remaining 30% drink Robusta, which is more bitter tasting but has 50% more caffeine than Arabica

 .

 .

Coffee grows on trees, which can grow up to 30 feet tall but commercially are cultivated to around 10 feet in height for easier picking

 .

 .

A coffee tree has a lifespan of about 50 to 70 years.

 .

 .

When it is in bloom, the coffee tree is covered with 30,000 white flowers which begin to develop into fruit after 24 – 36 hours.

 .

 .

A coffee tree can flower eight times in any one year – depending on rainfall.

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 .

The coffee cherries turn from yellow to orange and then bright red, 6 – 8 months after flowering.

 .

 .

One coffee tree yields less than half a kilo of coffee per year.

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 .

A French doctor in the 1600s suggested Cafe Au Laits for patients, inspiring people to begin adding milk to coffee.

 .

 .

The coffee bean is actually a seed inside a bright red berry

 .

 .

Coffee berries are picked, dried and stripped down until all that is left is the green bean

 .

 .

Once shipped the beans are roasted at around 500F, after a few minutes the bean will pop and double in size, a few minutes after that the bean will pop again which means the bean is ready

 .

 .

The aromas in coffee develop at the 10th minute of roasting.

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 .

Coffee increases in volume during roasting by 18.60%.

 .

 .

Caffeine is not the main bitter compound in coffee. Rather, the pungent perpetrators are antioxidants.

 .

 .

George Washington invented instant coffee. No, not him, the George Washington from Belgiun, living in Guatemala in 1906, although the invention has also been claimed by a Japanese American chemist known as Satori Kato in 1901.

 .

 .

Espresso is regulated by the Italian government because it is considered an essential part of their daily life

 .

 .

Espresso is not a particular roast, bean or blend, just the way the coffee is prepared by shooting pressurized hot water through finely ground coffee

 .

 .

Brewed espresso has 2.5% fat, while filtered coffee contains 0.6% fat.

 .

 .

It takes 40 coffee beans to make an espresso.

 .

 .

In 1822 the French were the first to innovate a crude espresso machine. The Italians then perfected this machine and became the first to manufacture it.

 .

 .

Contrary to popular belief, espresso has one-third the caffeine of a cup of coffee, simply due to serving size differences.

 .

 .

In 1785, the coffee revolt broke out in Prussia because coffee consumption was restricted to the nobility, the clergy and high officials.

 .

 .

James Mason invented the coffee percolator on December 26, 1865.

 .

 .

30% of coffee drinkers in US added a sweetener of some kind to their coffee, compared with 57% in UK.

 .

 .

Coffee sacks are usually made of hemp and weigh approximately 132 pounds when they are full of green coffee beans. It takes over 600,000 beans to fill a coffee sack.

 .

 .

October 1st is official “Coffee Day” in Japan.

 .

 .

Scientists have discovered more than 800 different aromatic compounds in coffee.

 .

 .

Italy now has over 200,000 coffee bars, and still growing.

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The term Americano comes from American GIs during WWII who would order espresso with water to dilute the strong flavor

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The term cup of Joe also comes from American servicemen in WWII who were known as big coffee drinkers

cuppa joe .

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The custom of tipping waiters originated in early European Coffee Houses, in order to receive good service in that loud, dirty, hectic place you needed to Tip Big.

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In the ancient Arab culture there was only one way a woman could legally divorce: If her husband didn’t provide enough coffee.

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Melitta Bentz a housewife from Dresden, Germany, invented the first coffee filter in 1908.

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Johan Sebastian Bach wrote an opera about a woman who was addicted to coffee.

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There is a way to brew coffee with marijuana in it and it is described as producing a “dreamy” kind of coffee buzz.

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In Greece and Turkey, the oldest person is always served their coffee first.

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Some of the worlds most powerful businesses, including Lloyds of London and the New York Stock Exchange, started life as a coffee houses.

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In the 1600s there was a controversy over whether or not Catholics could drink coffee, luckily for them Pope Clement VIII loved coffee and authorized its use.

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Caffeine, which is found in coffee, increases the effect of some painkillers, especially aspirin and paracetamol.

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Dorothy Jones of Boston was the first American coffee trader, In 1670 she was granted a license to sell coffee.

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In Africa coffee beans are soaked in water mixed with spices and served as candy to chew.

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A regular 6oz cup of coffee contains about 150 milligrams of caffeine, most physicians call this a “therapeutic dose”.

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There are over 50 species of coffee world wide. Though only 2, arabica and robusta, are commonly used in commercial coffee production.

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Robusta coffee beans have twice as much caffeine than Arabica beans, but our of less quality.

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If you drink five to 10 cups of decaffeinated coffee, you could get as much caffeine as from one or two cups of caffeinated coffee, a study found.

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To produce decaffeinated coffee the beans are steamed, so that dissolved caffeine rises to the surface, where it is washed off using an organic solvent called methylene chloride.

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Coffee can actually be used to fuel a car.

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At one point, Brazil had such a coffee surplus that they tried to find other uses for it, including using it to make plastic.

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The world record for most coffee consumption is 82 cups of coffee in 7 hours.

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Contrary to popular belief light roast coffee actually has more caffeine than dark roast coffee. The reason for this is that the longer coffee is roasted the more caffeine cooked out of the bean.

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An expert in preparing Turkish coffee is known as a “kahveci”.

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The Nicaraguan Margogpipe is the largest of all coffee beans.

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King Frederick of Germany created a special task force to search out illicit coffee smugglers. The task force was known as the Kaffee Schnuffler. The king believed that soldiers who drank coffee were not dependable.

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Both the French and American Revolutions were planned in coffee houses.

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‘Excelso’ or ‘supremo’ do not mean a better quality of coffee when used to describe coffee beans, it refers to the size of the coffee bean.

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Jim Henson, the creator of the Muppets got his start doing coffee ads.

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One the largest misconception in the U.S. today about coffee is that Mocha Java coffee is a chocolaty beverage. In fact there is no chocolate in the Mocha or Java bean at all. Mocha is the name of the largest port in Yemen, here is where all of the African coffee beans are traded and transported. Java is the name of an island in Indonesia where the Java Bean comes from. Both coffees are a dark bean and provide a very rich and bold coffee, when you mix the two together you get Mocha Java coffee.

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Coffee at one stage in its life or another provides a living to more than 100 million people.

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During World War II there was a coffee drinking competition between the branches of the military. The Marines claimed to drink the most – twenty cups a day.

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Coffee was so scarce in Germany that during WWII “coffee bombs” or bags of coffee were dropped from planes to turn the people against their government.

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In Staten Island, there’s a restaurant owner that drinks fifty cups of coffee a day.

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The actress who played the Wicked Witch Of The West in the Wizard Of Oz, Margaret Hamilton, was promoting Maxwell House in the 1970’s.

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In December 2001 Brazil produced a scented postage stamp to promote its coffee – the smell should last between 3 and 5 years.

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No matter what people tell you, caffeine cannot help you sober up.

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The first webcam was invented at The University of Cambridge to let people know if the coffee pot was full or not.

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The Japanese believe that bathing in coffee grounds fermented with pineapple pulp will reduce wrinkles and beautify the skin and there is a spa in Japan that lets you bathe in coffee, tea, or wine. I wouldn’t drink it though…

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Before coffee caught on in the US in the 1700s, beer was breakfast drink of choice. Difficult choice!

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Irish coffee was actually invented to warm up cold American plane passengers leaving from Ireland.

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On May 11, 1926, the slogan “Maxwell House Good to the last drop” was trademark registered.

 Coffee-Posters.

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There is a tourist agency for people wanting to take coffee vacations called Cafe Away.

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Norway drinks the most coffee per person. The United States is ranked number 12.

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Teddy Roosevelt is and was the greatest American coffee drinker, consuming a gallon a day. But you probably shouldn’t attempt to do that.

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The name cappuccino comes from: the resemblance of the drink to the clothing of the Capuchin monks.

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A study conducted at the University of Sao Paulo found that sperm motility was markedly higher in coffee drinkers versus non coffee-drinkers. And it turns out that it doesn’t matter whether you drink one or ten cups a day: The only detectable difference was found between coffee drinkers and non-coffee drinkers.

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Beethoven counted the number of coffee beans he used to make his coffee and insisted on 60 beans per cup.

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During the American Civil War soldiers who were craving coffee and couldn’t get it tried roasting sweet potatoes and corn to make a beverage similar to coffee. It obviously didn’t become a popular choice.

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In 1674 a group of London women formed a group called WPAC (Women’s Petition Against Coffee). They didn’t like the amount of time their husbands spent in coffee houses rather than being home where they belonged.

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According to David Levitsky, PhD, professor of nutritional science at Cornell University, “Caffeine decreases the rate at which the stomach dumps its contents into the duodenum – a part of the small intestine where digestion takes place – and also increases metabolic rate.” so sipping a cup post-meal could, in small part, help promote a healthy weight.

coffee maker .

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Water is the only beverage more popular than coffee.

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Coffee contains over 1200 chemicals and over half of those are responsible for creating its flavor.

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The average coffee drinker consumes 3 cups of coffee per day.

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Three countries consume 65% of the world’s coffee: America, France, and Germany.

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Coffee grounds sprinkled on the ground around plants and the garden will stop snails and slugs from eating the plants.

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Kenyan coffees are graded as ‘A’, ‘B’ and ‘C’. ‘AA’ is the best coffee. In Costa Rica, coffees are graded as ‘Strictly Hard Bean’, ‘Good Hard Bean’, ‘Hard Bean’, ‘Medium Hard Bean’, ‘High Grown Atlantic’, ‘Medium Grown Atlantic’, and ‘Low Grown Atlantic’. Those coffee beans from Colombia are labelled as ‘Supremo’, ‘Excelso’, ‘Extra’ and the lowest grade, ‘Pasilla’.

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In 1763, there were over 200 coffee shops in Venice.

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Caffeine is on the International Olympic Committee list of prohibited substances. Athletes who test positive for more than 12 micrograms of caffeine per millilitre of urine may be banned from the Olympic Games. This level may be reached after drinking about 5 cups of coffee.

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Coffee was first known in  Europe as Arabian Wine.

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It was said that cowboys made their coffee by putting ground coffee into a sock (hopefully a clean one) and immersed it in water heated over a camp fire. When ready, they would pour the coffee into tin cups and drink it.

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A study from the Harvard School of Public Health, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, found that women who regularly drink fully caffeinated coffee have a 20% lower risk of depression than non-coffee drinkers. The study, which followed a group of women for 10 years, found that as more coffee was consumed (up to six cups per day), the likelihood of depression decreased.

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There are two major coffee markets in the world. One is in London, which deals with the buying of Robusta coffee. The other is the ‘C’ contract market, known as Coffee, Sugar and Cocoa Exchange (CSCE), which is in New York. It handles the trade of Arabica coffee. The ‘C’ market is also a futures market.

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Finally, can you see the man?

coffee test

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