First Of June, First Quiz Of June.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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Summer is beckoning but not before you try another fasab quiz.

Twenty more random questions to test your knowledge.

As usual if you get stuck you can find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating!

Enjoy and good luck.

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Quiz 07

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Q.  1:  How many leaves are there on a shamrock?

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Q.  2:  It is the name of a region in Western Europe, a unique language, a close fitting bodice and a common form of the ball game Pelota. What is it?

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Q.  3:  What nationality was the first person to reach the North Pole alone and on foot?

            a) Finnish          b) English          c) Norwegian          d) Swedish

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Q.  4:  Which mode of transport did Christopher Cockerell invent in the 1950’s?

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Q.  5:  What word links a herb or other small vegetable growth, the buildings, equipment, etc., of a company or an institution, or a shot in snooker where the cue ball hits a red ball which hits another red ball to make it go into a pocket?

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Q.  6:  What city in the United States of America is known as the “City of Oaks” because of the many oak trees that line the streets in the heart of the city.

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Q.  7:  What is a female bear called?

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Q.  8:  Gävleborg, Gotland and Uppsala are among the counties of which country?

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Q.  9:  In which Olympic sport are there ‘Normal Hill’ and ‘Large Hill’ events?

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Q. 10:  In Greek mythology who went in search of the ‘Golden Fleece’ ? (You get a point for the name of the leader, the name given to his followers and two bonus points for the name of their ship.)

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Q. 11:  What color originates from a famous 16th Century Italian painter and what color is it? (A point for each correct answer.)

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Q. 12:  Which English city has more than 100 miles of canal?

            a) London            b) Birmingham            c) Manchester

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Q. 13:  Which empire ruled most of India and Pakistan in the 16th and 17th centuries?

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Q. 14:  What writer created the famous Baker Street detective?

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Q. 15:  Which black and white bird has the scientific name ‘Pica pica’ ?

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Q. 16:  What is the name given to that part of the North Atlantic bounded by the Gulf Stream on the west, the North Atlantic Current on the north, the Canary Current on the east, and the North Equatorial Current on the south.

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Q. 17:  If you added together all the voting seats in the US Senate and House of Representatives, how many idiots could sit down?

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Q. 18:  Name the star of the movie ‘Taken’.

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Q. 19:  What company, still in existence, was at one time the largest landowner in the world, having 15% of the land in North America?

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Q. 20:  Finally a chance to beef up that points score. What were the eight original tokens used in the board game ‘Monopoly’ ?  (A point for each correct answer and two bonus points if you get all eight correct.)

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ANSWERS

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Q.  1:  How many leaves are there on a shamrock?

A.  1:  Three (3).

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Q.  2:  It is the name of a region in Western Europe, a unique language, a close fitting bodice and a common form of the ball game Pelota. What is it?

A.  2:  Basque.

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Q.  3:  What nationality was the first person to reach the North Pole alone and on foot?

            a) Finnish          b) English          c) Norwegian          d) Swedish

A.  3:  The correct answer is c) Norwegian. He was Børge Ousland and he walked there by himself in 1994.

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Q.  4:  Which mode of transport did Christopher Cockerell invent in the 1950’s?

A.  4:  The Hovercraft.

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Q.  5:  What word links a herb or other small vegetable growth, the buildings, equipment, etc., of a company or an institution, or a shot in snooker where the cue ball hits a red ball which hits another red ball to make it go into a pocket?

A.  5:  A ‘plant’.

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Q.  6:  What city in the United States of America is known as the “City of Oaks” because of the many oak trees that line the streets in the heart of the city.

A.  6:  Raleigh, North Carolina, is known as the “City of Oaks”.

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Q.  7:  What is a female bear called?

A.  7:  A ‘sow’.

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Q.  8:  Gävleborg, Gotland and Uppsala are among the counties of which country?

A.  8:  Sweden.

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Q.  9:  In which Olympic sport are there ‘Normal Hill’ and ‘Large Hill’ events?

A.  9:  Ski jumping.

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Q. 10:  In Greek mythology who went in search of the ‘Golden Fleece’ ? (You get a point for the name of the leader, the name given to his followers and two bonus points for the name of their ship.)

A. 10:  His name was ‘Jason’, his followers were the ‘Argonauts’, and the name of their ship (after which the followers were named) was the Argo.

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Q. 11:  What color originates from a famous 16th Century Italian painter and what color is it? (A point for each correct answer.)

A. 11:  Titian, a brownish-orange color.

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Q. 12:  Which English city has more than 100 miles of canal?

            a) London            b) Birmingham            c) Manchester

A. 12:  The correct answer is b) Birmingham.

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Q. 13:  Which empire ruled most of India and Pakistan in the 16th and 17th centuries?

A. 13:  The Mughal Empire.

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Q. 14:  What writer created the famous Baker Street detective?

A. 14:  Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, his creation was Sherlock Holmes.

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Q. 15:  Which black and white bird has the scientific name ‘Pica pica’ ?

A. 15:  The (Common) Magpie.

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Q. 16:  What is the name given to that part of the North Atlantic bounded by the Gulf Stream on the west, the North Atlantic Current on the north, the Canary Current on the east, and the North Equatorial Current on the south.

A. 16:  It is called the Sargasso Sea.

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Q. 17:  If you added together all the voting seats in the US Senate and House of Representatives, how many idiots could sit down?

A. 17:  535 (100 + 435).

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Q. 18:  Name the star of the movie ‘Taken’.

A. 18:  Liam Neeson.

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Q. 19:  What company, still in existence, was at one time the largest landowner in the world, having 15% of the land in North America?

A. 19:  Hudson’s Bay Company.

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Q. 20:  Finally a chance to beef up that points score. What were the eight original tokens used in the board game ‘Monopoly’ ?  (A point for each correct answer and two bonus points if you get all eight correct.)

A. 20:  Wheelbarrow, Battleship, Racecar, Thimble, Old-style shoe (or boot), Scottie dog, Top hat, Iron.

original monopoly tokens

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May The 4th Quiz Be With You.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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I don’t know what it is, but I can’t resist using that “May The Force Be With You” thing on this date. Sorry, but you’ll probably see another version of it next year if we’re all still around in the blogshpere.

But to get on with today’s real business, I do have another quiz for you.

The usual random selection and also as usual you can find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating.

Enjoy and good luck.

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quiz01

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Q.  1:  What word links vacations to the phonetic alphabet?

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Q.  2:  What is the collective noun for a group of owls?

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Q.  3:  ‘PL’ is the international car registration for which country?

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Q.  4:  What city is also known as the ‘City of 72 Nations’ ?

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Q.  5:  What is the highest score that can be awarded by a figure-skating judge?

            a) 2            b) 4            c) 6            d) 8            e) 10

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Q.  6:  For what operation on the brain was Antonio de Egas Moniz of Portugal awarded the Nobel prize for medicine in 1949?

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Q.  7:  Who was prime minster of China under Chairman Mao?

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Q.  8:  Which literary characters set out on a journey from the Tabard Inn, Southwark?

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Q.  9:  What is the brightest star in the night sky?

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Q. 10:  Spain has many famous ‘costas’. A point for each one of the following you can name correctly the four below and a bonus point if you get them all.

 

Costa   _  _  _  _  _  _

Costa   _  _  _  _  _

Costa   _  _  _  _  _  _

Costa   _  _  _      _  _  _

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Q. 11:  What name links the writers Kipling, Conrad and Heller?

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Q. 12:  As well as being a girl’s best friend Diamonds are a form of which chemical element?

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Q. 13:  What is the difference in paddles between canoeing and kayaking?

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Q. 14:  In which country is Liberation of Saigon Day on April 30 a public holiday?

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Q. 15:  What is created when the loop of a meander of a river is cut off and the river diverted on a different course?

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Q. 16:  The number of voting representatives in the House of Representatives was fixed by law in 1911 at what number?

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Q. 17:  What color is a Welsh poppy?

             a)  Blue            b) Yellow            c) Red            d) White

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Q. 18:  How many valves does a trumpet have?

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Q. 19:  Which is the only American state to begin with the letter ‘P’ ?

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Q. 20:  Which band were Living Next Door to Alice in 1976?

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ANSWERS

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Q.  1:  What word links vacations to the phonetic alphabet?

A.  1:  Hotel.

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Q.  2:  What is the collective noun for a group of owls?

A.  2:  A parliament.

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Q.  3:  ‘PL’ is the international car registration for which country?

A.  3:  Poland.

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Q. 4: What city is also known as the ‘City of 72 Nations’ ?

A.  4:  Tehran.

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Q.  5:  What is the highest score that can be awarded by a figure-skating judge?

            a) 2            b) 4            c) 6            d) 8            e) 10

A.  5:  The correct answer is c) 6.

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Q.  6:  For what operation on the brain was Antonio de Egas Moniz of Portugal awarded the Nobel prize for medicine in 1949?

A.  6:  Prefrontal lobotomy.

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Q.  7:  Who was prime minster of China under Chairman Mao?

A.  7:  Chou En-Lai (or Zhou Enlai).

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Q.  8:  Which literary characters set out on a journey from the Tabard Inn, Southwark?

A.  8:  The pilgrims in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales.

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Q.  9:  What is the brightest star in the night sky?

A.  9:  Sirius (The Dog Star).

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Q. 10:  Spain has many famous ‘costas’. A point for each one of the following you can name correctly the four below and a bonus point if you get them all.

Costa  _  _  _  _  _  _

Costa  _  _  _  _  _

Costa  _  _  _  _  _  _

Costa  _  _  _    _  _  _

A. 10:  The correct answers are Costa BLANCA, Costa BRAVA, Costa DORADA, and the Costa DEL SOL

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Q. 11:  What name links the writers Kipling, Conrad and Heller?

A. 11:  The answer is ‘Joseph’. Joseph Conrad, Joseph Heller and although he was much better known as Rudyard Kipling his first name was also Joseph.

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Q. 12:  As well as being a girl’s best friend Diamonds are a form of which chemical element?

A. 12:  Carbon.

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Q. 13:  What is the difference in paddles between canoeing and kayaking?

A. 13:  Canoe paddles have a single face and Kayak paddles a double face.

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Q. 14:  In which country is Liberation of Saigon Day on April 30 a public holiday?

A. 14:  Vietnam.

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Q. 15:  What is created when the loop of a meander of a river is cut off and the river diverted on a different course?

A. 15:  Oxbow Lake.

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Q. 16:  The number of voting representatives in the House of Representatives was fixed by law in 1911 at what number?

A. 16:  The number of voting representatives in the House of Representatives was fixed by law in 1911 at no more than 435, proportionally representing the population of the 50 states.

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Q. 17:  What color is a Welsh poppy?

             a)  Blue            b) Yellow            c) Red            d) White

A. 17:  The correct answer is b) Yellow.

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Q. 18:  How many valves does a trumpet have?

A. 18:  A trumpet has 3 valves.

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Q. 19:  Which is the only American state to begin with the letter ‘p’?

A. 19:  Pennsylvania.

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Q. 20:  Which band were Living Next Door to Alice in 1976?

A. 20:  Smokie.

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Land Yourself A Lot Of Points In Today’s Quiz!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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Yes, there is the opportunity to land yourself with a lot of points in today’s quiz, but some of the questions are quite difficult too so don’t be over confidant.

However, don’t worry, if you get stuck you can always find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating!

Enjoy and good luck.

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Quiz 07

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Q.  1:  How many legs has a tarantula?

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Q.  2:  ‘Zn’ is the symbol of which chemical element?

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Q.  3:  What name is given to a baby elephant?

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Q.  4:  What is the smallest bone in the body and where is it located? (A point for each correct answer.)

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Q.  5:  What is the fahrenheit equivalent of 20 degrees centigrade?

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Q.  6:  What city is known as ‘The City of Lilies’ ?

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Q.  7:  Who was famous for his theory of gravity and 3 laws of motion?

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Q.  8:  What is the most common transplant operation?

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Q.  9:  What is the major element of the diet of the Koala bear?

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Q. 10:  And in a related question, what is the major element of the diet of the wild giant panda?

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Q. 11:  Which gas is responsible for global warming?

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Q. 12:  The Ross and Weddell Seas are to be found off the shore of which continent?

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Q. 13:  Now for a mega-point question. Listed below (in alphabetical order) are ten countries ending in the word ‘land’. A point for each one you can name correctly.

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _   _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _   _ _ _ _ _ _ L A N D _

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ L A N D

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Q. 14:  Who led the Seventh Cavalry to its doom at the Battle of Little Bighorn?

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Q. 15:  John Flamsteed was the first holder of which far-sighted post, created in 1675?

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Q. 16:  What term is given to the technique where paint is mixed and bound with egg yolk?

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Q. 17:  What was launched by Pope Urban II at the Council of Clermont in 1095?

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Q. 18:  Who went on a circumnavigation of the world from the Reform Club as the result of a bet?

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Q. 19:  Which New Zealand-born physicist is credited with splitting the atom?

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Q. 20:  Which motoring aid was invented by Percy Shaw?

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ANSWERS

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Q.  1:  How many legs has a tarantula?

A.  1:  Eight.

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Q.  2:  ‘Zn’ is the symbol of which chemical element?

A.  2:  Zinc.

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Q.  3:  What name is given to a baby elephant?

A.  3:  A baby elephant is called a ‘Calf’.

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Q.  4:  What is the smallest bone in the body and where is it located? (A point for each correct answer.)

A.  4:  It is called the ‘Stirrup’ and it is located in the ear.

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Q.  5:  What is the fahrenheit equivalent of 20 degrees centigrade?

A.  5:  20 degrees centigrade is 68 degrees Fahrenheit.

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Q.  6:  What city is known as ‘The City of Lilies’ ?

A.  6:  Florence.

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Q.  7:  Who was famous for his theory of gravity and 3 laws of motion?

A.  7:  Sir Isaac Newton.

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Q.  8:  What is the most common transplant operation?

A.  8:  The Bone graft.

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Q.  9:  What is the major element of the diet of the Koala bear?

A.  9:  Eucalyptus leaves.

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Q. 10:  And in a related question, what is the major element of the diet of the wild giant panda?

A. 10:  A wild giant panda’s diet is almost exclusively (99 percent) bamboo.

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Q. 11:  Which gas is responsible for global warming?

A. 11:  Carbon dioxide.

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Q. 12:  The Ross and Weddell Seas are to be found off the shore of which continent?

A. 12:  Antarctica.

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Q. 13:  Now for a mega-point question. Listed below (in alphabetical order) are ten countries ending in the word ‘land’. A point for each one you can name correctly.

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _   _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _   _ _ _ _ _ _ L A N D _

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ L A N D

A. 13:  The correct answers are:

            FINLAND

            ICELAND

            IRELAND

            NORTHERN IRELAND

            NEW ZEALAND

            THE NETHERLANDS

            POLAND

            SWAZILAND

            SWITZERLAND

            THAILAND.

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Q. 14:  Who led the Seventh Cavalry to its doom at the Battle of Little Bighorn?

A. 14:  Lt-Col George Armstrong Custer.

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Q. 15:  John Flamsteed was the first holder of which far-sighted post, created in 1675?

A. 15:  He was the first Astronomer Royal.

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Q. 16:  What term is given to the technique where paint is mixed and bound with egg yolk?

A. 16:  It is known as ‘Tempera’.

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Q. 17:  What was launched by Pope Urban II at the Council of Clermont in 1095?

A. 17:  The First Crusade.

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Q. 18:  Who went on a circumnavigation of the world from the Reform Club as the result of a bet?

A. 18:  Phileas Fogg and his servant Passepartout (you get the point for naming Phileas Fogg correctly AND two posssible bonus points if you also knew the name of his servant. (From Jules Verne’s Around the World in Eighty Days).

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Q. 19:  Which New Zealand-born physicist is credited with splitting the atom?

A. 19:  Sir Ernest Rutherford.

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Q. 20:  Which motoring aid was invented by Percy Shaw?

A. 20:  He invented the reflectors known as ‘Cats eyes’, getting his inspiration when he saw a light reflecting off a cat’s eyes as it walked towards him. (British comedian Ken Dodd said that if the cat had been walking away from him he would probably have invented the pencil sharpener!)

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The Big Easy Quiz.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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Well maybe not just so easy a quiz as all that. You’ll find out below, and why I called it that too.

All the usual mixture of questions are here.

And as usual if you get stuck you can find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating!

Enjoy and good luck.

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Quiz 4

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Q.  1:  What city is known as ‘The Big Easy’ ?

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Q.  2:  What color are the flowers of the ‘harebell’ ?

            a)  red            b) green            c) blue            d) yellow

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Q.  3:  What is the name of the process in which a solid turns directly into a gas, without passing through the liquid phase?

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Q.  4:  What is the largest wild member of the dog family?

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Q.  5:  Which element has the symbol ‘Au’ ?

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Q.  6:  What is the electrical unit of resistance?

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Q.  7:  Who invented the jet engine in 1930?

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Q.  8:  How many sheets of paper are there in a ‘ream’ ?

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Q.  9:  It is called the ‘Hunter’ and consists of 3 stars, what is the proper name of this constellation?

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Q. 10:  What did the British government do on the roads in order to reduce accidents in 1925?

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Q. 11:  What is a ‘Flemish giant’ ?

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Q. 12:  The Balearic Islands are an archipelago of Spain in the western Mediterranean Sea, near the eastern coast of the Iberian Peninsula. You get a point if you can name any of the four largest islands that make up this group. (If you can correctly name more than one, give yourself a bonus point for each.)

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Q. 13:  If you were ‘purling’, what activity would you be doing?

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Q. 14:  Which famous battle was fought on June 18 1815?

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Q. 15:  In which country was the world’s first female Prime Minister elected in 1960?

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Q. 16:  What is the name of Long John Silver’s parrot?

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Q. 17:  This is the name of a famous bicycle manufacturing company, the capital city of a state in the US, and of a writer, poet, soldier, politician, courtier, spy, and explorer in Elizabethan England, what is it?

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Q. 18:  Who created the famous sculptures ‘The Thinker’ and ‘The Kiss’ ?

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Q. 19:  A lot of us now use it, but what does the acronym ‘VOIP’ stand for?

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Q. 20:  Which group’s best-known recording is the 1967 single ‘A Whiter Shade of Pale’ ?

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ANSWERS

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Q.  1:  What city is known as ‘The Big Easy’ ?

A.  1:  New Orleans is known as ‘The Big Easy’.

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Q.  2:  What color are the flowers of the harebell?

            a)  red            b) green            c) blue            d) yellow

A.  2:  The correct answer is c) blue.

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Q.  3:  What is the name of the process in which a solid turns directly into a gas, without passing through the liquid phase?

A.  3:  The process is called ‘sublimation’.

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Q.  4:  What is the largest wild member of the dog family?

A.  4:  The wolf.

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Q.  5:  Which element has the symbol ‘Au’ ?

A.  5:  Gold.

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Q.  6:  What is the electrical unit of resistance?

A.  6:  The ‘ohm’.

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Q.  7:  Who invented the jet engine in 1930?

A.  7:  Frank Whittle.

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Q.  8:  How many sheets of paper are there in a ‘ream’ ?

A.  8:  500.

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Q.  9:  It is called the ‘Hunter’ and consists of 3 stars, what is the proper name of this constellation?

A.  9:  It is ‘Orion’s belt’.

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Q. 10:  What did the British government do on the roads in order to reduce accidents in 1925?

A. 10:  They painted white lines.

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Q. 11:  What is a ‘Flemish giant’ ?

A. 11:  I’m tempted to give you a point if you said “A big Belgian’ but I won’t. You get the point if you said a Flemish giant was a Rabbit.

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Q. 12:  The Balearic Islands are an archipelago of Spain in the western Mediterranean Sea, near the eastern coast of the Iberian Peninsula. You get a point if you can name any of the four largest islands that make up this group. (If you can correctly name more than one, give yourself a bonus point for each.)

A. 12:  The four largest Balearic islands are Majorca, Minorca, Ibiza and Formentera.

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Q. 13:  If you were ‘purling’, what activity would you be doing?

A. 13:  You’d be knitting.

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Q. 14:  Which famous battle was fought on June 18 1815?

A. 14:  The Battle of Waterloo.

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Q. 15:  In which country was the world’s first female Prime Minister elected in 1960?

A. 15:  Sri Lanka (or Ceylon as it was then – the woman in question being Mrs Sirimavo Bandaranaike)

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Q. 16:  What is the name of Long John Silver’s parrot?

A. 16:  Captain Flint.

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Q. 17:  This is the name of a famous bicycle manufacturing company, the capital city of a state in the US, and of a writer, poet, soldier, politician, courtier, spy, and explorer in Elizabethan England, what is it?

A. 17:  It is ‘Raleigh’. Raleigh is a famous bicycle manufacturing company, Raleigh is the capital city of North Carolina, and the famous Elizabethan was Sir Walter Raleigh.

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Q. 18:  Who created the famous sculptures ‘The Thinker’ and ‘The Kiss’ ?

A. 18:  Auguste Rodin.

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Q. 19:  A lot of us now use it, but what does the acronym ‘VOIP’ stand for?

A. 19:  Voice Over Internet Protocol.

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Q. 20:  Which group’s best-known recording is the 1967 single ‘A Whiter Shade of Pale’ ?

A. 20:  Procol Harum. (Here it is….)

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Lots Of Names In Today’s Quiz.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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Yes, lots of names in today’s quiz, either as the answers or as part of the questions.

Some easy and some quite difficult, but you’ll have to have a bit of knowledge of various subjects to answer them all correctly.

And as usual, if you get stuck, you can find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating!

Enjoy and good luck.

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quiz 2

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 Q.  1:  In which city does the American football team the ’49ers’ play?

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Q.  2:  These two men had the same name, one was sentenced to death by hanging in the United States in 1859 and the other was a Ghillie who became close to Queen Victoria after the death of her husband Prince Albert –  what was their name?

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Q.  3:  And still on the subject of names, separated only by a vowel, what were the surnames of two famous painters born in Paris, France during the 19th Century who had a significant impact on the ‘impressionist’ movement? (There is usually a point for each correct answer in questions like this, but in this case if you get one right you’ll get them both right, so just one point up for grabs.)

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Q.  4:  What type of animal is an Ibex?

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Q.  5:  Who and what is ‘Tristan da Cunha’ ? (A point for each correct answer.)

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Q.  6:  Which treaty with Germany brought a formal end to the First World War?

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Q.  7:  What city is known as the ‘fashion capital of the world’ ?

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Q.  8:  ‘Entomology’ is the study of what?

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Q.  9:  In which organ of the body is insulin produced?

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Q. 10:  As well as skiing, which other sport takes place on a piste?

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Q. 11:  Who had himself crowned King of Scotland at Scone in 1306?

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Q. 12:  Who performed the first human heart transplant?

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Q. 13:  Who is the victim of ‘The Murder in the Cathedral’ in T S Eliot’s play of that name?

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Q. 14:  In the Crimean War, Roger Fenton was the first person to be accredited in what capacity?

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Q. 15:  What fictional character famously ‘tilted at windmills’ and who served as his ‘squire’ ?

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Q. 16:  Which chemical element, number 11 in the Periodic table, has the symbol ‘Na’ ?

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Q. 17:  What is the longest bone in the human body?

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Q. 18:  In which spacecraft did Yuri Gagarin become the first man in space?

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Q. 19:  In which country are two islands linked by the Seikan rail tunnel, the longest rail tunnel in the world? (Two bonus points are available if you can also correctly name the islands.)

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Q. 20:  ‘Professor Henry Higgins’ and ‘Eliza Doolittle’ central characters in which George Bernard Shaw play and which Hollywood musical?

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ANSWERS

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Q.  1:  In which city does the American football team the ’49ers’ play?

A.  1:  San Francisco.

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Q.  2:  These two men had the same name, one was sentenced to death by hanging in the United States in 1859 and the other was a Ghillie who became close to Queen Victoria after the death of her husband Prince Albert –  what was their name?

A.  2:  John Brown.

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Q.  3:  And still on the subject of names, separated only by a vowel, what were the surnames of two famous painters born in Paris, France during the 19th Century who had a significant impact on the ‘impressionist’ movement? (There is usually a point for each correct answer in questions like this, but in this case if you get one right you’ll get them both right, so just one point up for grabs.)

A.  3:  They are Édouard Manet (born 23 January 1832) and Oscar-Claude Monet (born 14 November 1840).

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Q.  4:  What type of animal is an Ibex?

A.  4:  A Mountain Goat.

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Q.  5:  Who and what is ‘Tristan da Cunha’ ? (A point for each correct answer.)

A.  5:  ‘Tristan da Cunha’ is the name of a famous Portuguese navigator and the name of an island in the South Atlantic that he first sighted it in 1506.

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Q.  6:  Which treaty with Germany brought a formal end to the First World War?

A.  6:  The Treaty of Versailles.

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Q.  7:  What city is known as the ‘fashion capital of the world’ ?

A.  7:  Milan.

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Q.  8:  ‘Entomology’ is the study of what?

A.  8:  Insects.

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Q.  9:  In which organ of the body is insulin produced?

A.  9:  The Pancreas.

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Q. 10:  As well as skiing, which other sport takes place on a piste?

A. 10:  Fencing.

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Q. 11:  Who had himself crowned King of Scotland at Scone in 1306?

A. 11:  Robert the Bruce. (Think back to the final scene in the movie Braveheart.)

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Q. 12:  Who performed the first human heart transplant?

A. 12:  Doctor Christian Barnard.

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Q. 13:  Who is the victim of ‘The Murder in the Cathedral’ in T S Eliot’s play of that name?

A. 13:  Thomas Beckett.

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Q. 14:  In the Crimean War, Roger Fenton was the first person to be accredited in what capacity?

A. 14:  War Photographer.

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Q. 15:  What fictional character famously ‘tilted at windmills’ and who served as his ‘squire’ ?

A. 15:  Don Quixote and his squire was Sancho Panza. (From the Spanish novel by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra.)

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Q. 16:  Which chemical element, number 11 in the Periodic table, has the symbol ‘Na’ ?

A. 16:  Sodium.

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Q. 17:  What is the longest bone in the human body?

A. 17:  The femur, or thighbone, either answer gets you the point.

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Q. 18:  In which spacecraft did Yuri Gagarin become the first man in space?

A. 18:  Vostok 1.

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Q. 19:  In which country are two islands linked by the Seikan rail tunnel, the longest rail tunnel in the world? (Two bonus points are available if you can also correctly name the islands.)

A. 19:  The country is Japan, and for your two bonus points the names of the islands are Honshu and Hokkaido.

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Q. 20:  ‘Professor Henry Higgins’ and ‘Eliza Doolittle’ central characters in which George Bernard Shaw play and which Hollywood musical?

A. 20:  The play is called ‘Pygmalion’ and the movie version ‘My Fair Lady’.

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J.F.K.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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Fifty-one years ago today the United States 35th President, John F Kennedy, was assassinated at Dealy Plaza, in Dallas, Texas. We all know the story and the various conspiracy theories that have been written about ad nauseam over the past half century so this post is not about that.

Rather it is about one of the legacies of the JFK name, the USS John F Kennedy, the only ship of her class (a variant of the Kitty Hawk class of aircraft carrier) and the last conventionally powered carrier built for the United States Navy.

Although it was retired in 2007 after nearly 40 years of service in the United States Navy, the Kennedy was a very impressive ship. For those who like the details it measures 1,052 feet long, has a beam of 130 feet, and draws 37 feet of water. The flight deck is 1,046 feet by 252 feet.

The JFK displaces 81,430 tons at full load and her compliment is 155 officers, 2,775 enlisted (ship’s company), and 2,160 enlisted and 320 officers (embarked air wing).

it’s top speed is 32 knots, and her cruising speed is 20 knots. The operational range at 30 knots is 4,000 miles while the maximum cruising range is 12,000 miles.

USS JFK is equipped with 4 aircraft elevators and features 4 steam-powered catapults and 4 arresting wires. The carrier was capable of launching and recovering aircraft simultaneously and could embark 80+ aircraft, depending on mission requirements.

Aircraft on board included 56 F/A-18 hornet strike fighters, 6 S-3B Viking ASW aircraft, 4 EA-6B Prowler offensive electronic warfare aircraft, 4 E-2C Hawkeye electronic early warning aircraft, 2 ES-3A Shadow electronic warfare (SIGINT) aircraft, 4 SH-60F Seahawk ASW helicopters, and 2 HH-60H Seahawk combat search and rescue aircraft.

Its armaments included two Mk 29 Sea Sparrow Guided Missile Launch Systems, two RAM (Rolling Airframe Missile) systems, and two Mk 15 Phalanx 20mm CIWS (Close In Weapon System.)

During it’s service it was stationed some of the time in the Mediterranean area.

If you have never seen one of these babies up close and personal and wanted to get an idea of just how big and impressive they are have a look at the aeriel photograph below, taken as the JFK berthed at the island of Malta.

Compared to the houses, cars and people you can see in the shot I’m not sure the word ‘big’ is big enough to describe it.

I mean I wouldn’t want to mess with it. Would you?

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uss jfk in malta

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Another Monday, Another Quiz Day.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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Yes folks, another Monday and another Quiz Day.

I hope you enjoy trying this challenging selection of questions.

And as usual if you get stuck, you can find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating!

Enjoy and good luck.

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quiz confused1

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Q.  1:  What demands an answer, but asks no questions?

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Q.  2:  What type of creature is a ‘Bonito’?

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Q.  3:  What part of the body has the greatest capacity to cool itself?

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Q.  4:  In what country was ‘Canadian Club’ whiskey first distilled?

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Q.  5:  What name is given to a person that stuffs animals for display?

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Q.  6:  What is unusual about the ‘crab eating seal’?

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Q.  7:  For what process do plants need sunlight, CO2 and water?

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Q.  8:  What is the name for an animal that feeds on (a) plants and (b) meat? (You get a point for each correct answer.)

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Q.  9:  What is hydrophobia more commonly known as (clue: it’s not the fear of water)?

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Q. 10:  What is the smallest bird in the world?

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Q. 11:  What name is given to calcite deposits (a) suspended from cave roofs and (b) the formations that rise from the floor of a cave due to the accumulation of material deposited from ceiling drippings? (You get a point for each correct answer.)

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Q. 12:  In physics, what is defined as something that causes a change in the acceleration of an object?

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Q. 13:  Which element is used in the manufacture of computer microprocessors?

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Q. 14:  What is mixed with steel to make it stainless?

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Q. 15:  What is the collective name for a group of finches?

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Q. 16:  What is the angle between the hands of a clock at 1 o’clock?

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Q. 17:  How many men’s names are there in the standard phonetic alphabet and what are they? (Score one point for the correct total and a point for each name you answer correctly.)

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Q. 18:  With which branch of medicine is Mesmer associated?

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Q. 19:  Guglielmo Marconi pioneered the development of what?

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Q. 20:  What type of animal is a ‘silverback’?

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ANSWERS

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Q.  1:  What demands an answer, but asks no questions?

A.  1:  A telephone.

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Q.  2:  What type of creature is a ‘Bonito’?

A.  2:  A fish (between mackerel and tuna)

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Q.  3:  What part of the body has the greatest capacity to cool itself?

A.  3:  The hands.

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Q.  4:  In what country was ‘Canadian Club’ whiskey first distilled?

A.  4:  The USA (Detroit, in 1858 by American Hiram Walker using the brand Walker’s Club Whiskey – he subsequently moved the business to Ontario where it was renamed in 1889.)

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Q.  5:  What name is given to a person that stuffs animals for display?

A.  5:  A Taxidermist.

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Q.  6:  What is unusual about the ‘crab eating seal’?

A.  6:  It doesn’t eat crabs.

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Q.  7:  For what process do plants need sunlight, CO2 and water?

A.  7:  Photosynthesis.

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Q.  8:  What is the name for an animal that feeds on (a) plants and (b) meat? (You get a point for each correct answer.)

A.  8:  Answer (a) herbivore and (b) carnivore.

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Q.  9:  What is hydrophobia more commonly known as (clue: it’s not the fear of water)?

A.  9:  Rabies.

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Q. 10:  What is the smallest bird in the world?

A. 10:  The hummingbird.

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Q. 11:  What name is given to calcite deposits (a) suspended from cave roofs and (b) the formations that rise from the floor of a cave due to the accumulation of material deposited from ceiling drippings? (You get a point for each correct answer.)

A. 11:  Answer (a) Stalactites hang from the cave roof and (b) Stalagmites rise from the cave floor.

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Q. 12:  In physics, what is defined as something that causes a change in the acceleration of an object?

A. 12:  A Force.

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Q. 13:  Which element is used in the manufacture of computer microprocessors?

A. 13:  Silicon – hence Silicon Valley in California where most of the major internet companies are based.

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Q. 14:  What is mixed with steel to make it stainless?

A. 14:  Chromium.

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Q. 15:  What is the collective name for a group of finches?

A. 15:  A Charm.

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Q. 16:  What is the angle between the hands of a clock at 1 o’clock?

A. 16:  30 degrees  (360 / 12).  

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Q. 17:  How many men’s names are there in the standard phonetic alphabet and what are they? (Score one point for the correct total and a point for each name you answer correctly.)

A. 17:  There are 5 men’s names in the standard phonetic alphabet; they are Charlie, Mike, Oscar, Romeo, and Victor.

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Q. 18:  With which branch of medicine is Mesmer associated?

A. 18:  Hypnotism.

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Q. 19:  Guglielmo Marconi pioneered the development of what?

A. 19:  Radio.

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Q. 20:  What type of animal is a ‘silverback’?

A. 20:  An adult male gorilla is called a ‘silverback’ because of the distinctive silvery fur growing on their back and hips. Each gorilla family has a ‘silverback’ as leader who scares away other animals by standing on their back legs and beating their chest!

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