Should We Let The Tail Continue To Wag The Dog?

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

They say that nothing is free and in America that is certainly true as regards freedom of religious beliefs.

If you are a Christian, that is.

If you are a Muslim, or a Hindu, or a Sikh, or a Buddhist, or even an atheist, the constitutional protections of your civil rights will be upheld and fought for by all and sundry. Silly looking people will hold up even sillier looking signs supporting your point of view.

silly protest sign

If you are a Christian, however, you will find you only have the freedom to do what minority groups dictate, not what conforms to your religious beliefs.

Aaron and Melissa Klein, the owners of a mom and pop bakery they call ‘Sweet Cakes By Melissa’, found that out a while ago when they refused to bake a wedding cake for a lesbian couple in 2013. They have been ordered by the Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industry (BOLI-cks for short) to pay $135,000 in damages to the two lesbians for “emotional suffering.”

It makes me wonder if Donald Trump will launch a similar suit against Macy’s for the “emotional suffering” he has been caused by Macy’s refusing to sell his merchandise? I would imagine for a man with that kind of ego the “emotional suffering” would be substantial, at least a billion dollar’s worth, I reckon.

Apparently in Oregon, and probably in other states, it is now illegal for a business to refuse to serve someone because of their sexual orientation. Most probably the same applies if you are of a particular race, color, or religion. However, there is no equivalent law to protect the religious beliefs of business owners.

sweet cakes_closed_sign

Now I could care less whether you are a lesbian or a Presbyterian, that’s not the issue here. The issue is that you can’t have a law that protects one sector of the community at the expense of another. More to the point you can’t have a ridiculous legal system that is both unfair and illogical.

But you do.

And it’s getting worse.

Just as the Freedom Act took away more freedoms than it gave, the government is stealthily and overtly eroding the individual citizen’s right to live their lives as they want to and as their beliefs dictate.

Sure you have to have rules, like don’t murder people, drive on the correct side of the road, and that kind of thing otherwise there would be chaos. But trying to control and micro-manage every thought and action of the people, which is what the government is now about, is both unnecessary and unwanted.

Big Brother control room
Big Brother control room

I’m now wondering what happens if you come into my gun shop and I don’t like the look of you and refuse to sell you a gun or other weapon. Am I within my rights? Or can you sue me for the “emotional suffering” of not being able to kill your family or hold up a bank?

Or can I sue you if you own the gayest cake shop in America but refuse to serve me because I am a Christian? That would be an interesting one in the light of the Oregon decision.

What happens if you are a Christian lesbian? What sort of “emotional suffering” does that cause? And can you sue yourself for damages? I’m sure there’s a judge somewhere stupid enough to grant you a big payout, but of course you would have to pay it to yourself, unless the state would step in because of your sexual orientation and cough up the cash for you.

You see where this is going?

deliberate dumbing down of America
deliberate dumbing down of America

Just as they wrecked the education system in many western countries by teaching the brightest people in the school at the same pace as the dumbest, thereby lowering the level of education of everyone and churning out a multitude of idiots who can barely read, or write, or count, now we have to pander to every minority no matter how few people they represent and no matter how much their minority beliefs offend our own.

Minority rights don’t really matter to the government because they don’t make up enough of the population. If and when the need arises minorities can be brought to heel. The majority is a different matter though and what has been discussed in this blog post is all part of the dumbing down of society and instilling fear in anyone from the majority community who dares to stand up and challenge authority. The threat of a  six figure fine, or worse, ensures compliance in most people.

My old late lamented friend George Carlin summed it up so well when he said, “Governments don’t want well informed, well educated people capable of critical thinking. That is against their interests. They want obedient workers, people who are just smart enough to run the machines and do the paperwork. And just dumb enough to passively accept it.”

Protection of minority rights in a society is one thing – and a good thing – and should be defended at all costs. But it should be done for the right reasons AND it should be in addition to the rights of the majority, never at their expense.

Otherwise you might as well throw out the “all men are created equal” bit of the constitution and just let the tail continue to wag the dog.

dog-tail

.

========================================

.

First Of June, First Quiz Of June.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Summer is beckoning but not before you try another fasab quiz.

Twenty more random questions to test your knowledge.

As usual if you get stuck you can find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating!

Enjoy and good luck.

.

Quiz 07

.

Q.  1:  How many leaves are there on a shamrock?

.

.

Q.  2:  It is the name of a region in Western Europe, a unique language, a close fitting bodice and a common form of the ball game Pelota. What is it?

.

.

Q.  3:  What nationality was the first person to reach the North Pole alone and on foot?

            a) Finnish          b) English          c) Norwegian          d) Swedish

.

.

Q.  4:  Which mode of transport did Christopher Cockerell invent in the 1950’s?

.

.

Q.  5:  What word links a herb or other small vegetable growth, the buildings, equipment, etc., of a company or an institution, or a shot in snooker where the cue ball hits a red ball which hits another red ball to make it go into a pocket?

.

.

Q.  6:  What city in the United States of America is known as the “City of Oaks” because of the many oak trees that line the streets in the heart of the city.

.

.

Q.  7:  What is a female bear called?

.

.

Q.  8:  Gävleborg, Gotland and Uppsala are among the counties of which country?

.

.

Q.  9:  In which Olympic sport are there ‘Normal Hill’ and ‘Large Hill’ events?

.

.

Q. 10:  In Greek mythology who went in search of the ‘Golden Fleece’ ? (You get a point for the name of the leader, the name given to his followers and two bonus points for the name of their ship.)

.

.

Q. 11:  What color originates from a famous 16th Century Italian painter and what color is it? (A point for each correct answer.)

.

.

Q. 12:  Which English city has more than 100 miles of canal?

            a) London            b) Birmingham            c) Manchester

.

.

Q. 13:  Which empire ruled most of India and Pakistan in the 16th and 17th centuries?

.

.

Q. 14:  What writer created the famous Baker Street detective?

.

.

Q. 15:  Which black and white bird has the scientific name ‘Pica pica’ ?

.

.

Q. 16:  What is the name given to that part of the North Atlantic bounded by the Gulf Stream on the west, the North Atlantic Current on the north, the Canary Current on the east, and the North Equatorial Current on the south.

.

.

Q. 17:  If you added together all the voting seats in the US Senate and House of Representatives, how many idiots could sit down?

.

.

Q. 18:  Name the star of the movie ‘Taken’.

.

.

Q. 19:  What company, still in existence, was at one time the largest landowner in the world, having 15% of the land in North America?

.

.

Q. 20:  Finally a chance to beef up that points score. What were the eight original tokens used in the board game ‘Monopoly’ ?  (A point for each correct answer and two bonus points if you get all eight correct.)

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>
ANSWERS

.

Q.  1:  How many leaves are there on a shamrock?

A.  1:  Three (3).

.

.

Q.  2:  It is the name of a region in Western Europe, a unique language, a close fitting bodice and a common form of the ball game Pelota. What is it?

A.  2:  Basque.

.

.

Q.  3:  What nationality was the first person to reach the North Pole alone and on foot?

            a) Finnish          b) English          c) Norwegian          d) Swedish

A.  3:  The correct answer is c) Norwegian. He was Børge Ousland and he walked there by himself in 1994.

.

.

Q.  4:  Which mode of transport did Christopher Cockerell invent in the 1950’s?

A.  4:  The Hovercraft.

.

.

Q.  5:  What word links a herb or other small vegetable growth, the buildings, equipment, etc., of a company or an institution, or a shot in snooker where the cue ball hits a red ball which hits another red ball to make it go into a pocket?

A.  5:  A ‘plant’.

.

.

Q.  6:  What city in the United States of America is known as the “City of Oaks” because of the many oak trees that line the streets in the heart of the city.

A.  6:  Raleigh, North Carolina, is known as the “City of Oaks”.

.

.

Q.  7:  What is a female bear called?

A.  7:  A ‘sow’.

.

.

Q.  8:  Gävleborg, Gotland and Uppsala are among the counties of which country?

A.  8:  Sweden.

.

.

Q.  9:  In which Olympic sport are there ‘Normal Hill’ and ‘Large Hill’ events?

A.  9:  Ski jumping.

.

.

Q. 10:  In Greek mythology who went in search of the ‘Golden Fleece’ ? (You get a point for the name of the leader, the name given to his followers and two bonus points for the name of their ship.)

A. 10:  His name was ‘Jason’, his followers were the ‘Argonauts’, and the name of their ship (after which the followers were named) was the Argo.

.

.

Q. 11:  What color originates from a famous 16th Century Italian painter and what color is it? (A point for each correct answer.)

A. 11:  Titian, a brownish-orange color.

.

.

Q. 12:  Which English city has more than 100 miles of canal?

            a) London            b) Birmingham            c) Manchester

A. 12:  The correct answer is b) Birmingham.

.

.

Q. 13:  Which empire ruled most of India and Pakistan in the 16th and 17th centuries?

A. 13:  The Mughal Empire.

.

.

Q. 14:  What writer created the famous Baker Street detective?

A. 14:  Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, his creation was Sherlock Holmes.

.

.

Q. 15:  Which black and white bird has the scientific name ‘Pica pica’ ?

A. 15:  The (Common) Magpie.

.

.

Q. 16:  What is the name given to that part of the North Atlantic bounded by the Gulf Stream on the west, the North Atlantic Current on the north, the Canary Current on the east, and the North Equatorial Current on the south.

A. 16:  It is called the Sargasso Sea.

.

.

Q. 17:  If you added together all the voting seats in the US Senate and House of Representatives, how many idiots could sit down?

A. 17:  535 (100 + 435).

.

.

Q. 18:  Name the star of the movie ‘Taken’.

A. 18:  Liam Neeson.

.

.

Q. 19:  What company, still in existence, was at one time the largest landowner in the world, having 15% of the land in North America?

A. 19:  Hudson’s Bay Company.

.

.

Q. 20:  Finally a chance to beef up that points score. What were the eight original tokens used in the board game ‘Monopoly’ ?  (A point for each correct answer and two bonus points if you get all eight correct.)

A. 20:  Wheelbarrow, Battleship, Racecar, Thimble, Old-style shoe (or boot), Scottie dog, Top hat, Iron.

original monopoly tokens

.

==========================

.

From Alien Invasion To Vitamins – Another Quiz Day Is Here.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Welcome to another Quiz Day at the fasab blog.

Another challenging selection of questions.

But as usual, if you get stuck, you can the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating!

Enjoy and good luck.

.

quiz 10

.

Q.  1:  Who has been a private investigator in Hawaii, an American cowboy in Australia and the police commissioner in New York city?

.

.

Q.  2:  What do you call a group of bears?

.

.

Q.  3:  Which Eastern European city is known as the ‘City of a Hundred Spires’

.

.

Q.  4:  Which country’s flag includes a cedar tree?

.

.

Q.  5:  In which book does an alien invasion commence in Woking?

.

.

Q.  6:  Which subatomic particles are found in the nucleus of an atom?

.

.

Q.  7:  Which sugar is found in milk?

.

.

Q.  8:  This one is the name of the largest species of big cat to be found in South America and a make of automobile?

.

.

Q.  9:  What is the name given to the part of the Earth that lies between the outer core and the crust?

.

.

Q. 10:  You see it on your cereal packet all the time, but Riboflavin is an alternative name for which vitamin of the B Group?

            a) Vitamin B1        b) Vitamin B2      c) Vitamin B3        d) Vitamin B12

.

.

Q. 11:  Not part of the UK, but still known as British Crown Dependencies, the Channel Islands are situated in the English Channel just off the coast of France. You get a point for each of the four main islands in this group you can name correctly.

.

.

Q. 12:  Which is the world’s tallest mammal?

.

.

Q. 13:  ‘It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen,’ is the first line from which book?

.

.

Q. 14:  What is the approximate diameter of Earth?

   a) 4,000 miles        b) 6,000 miles       c) 8,000 miles       d) 10,000 miles

.

.

Q. 15:  What gifted actress played the part of an FBI trainee in the movie ‘Silence Of The Lambs’ and what was the name of the character she played? (A point for each correct answer.)

.

.

Q. 16:  What is the world’s smallest flightless bird?

.

.

Q. 17:  In the publishing industry what does the acronym ‘POD’ mean?

.

.

Q. 18:  What color is a Himalayan poppy?

            a) Red              b) Yellow               c) Green               d) Blue

.

.

Q. 19:  What flavor is Cointreau?

.

.

Q. 20:  On which multi-million selling album would you find the Nasal Choir, Moribund Chorus and Girlie Chorus?

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

ANSWERS

.

Q.  1:  Who has been a private investigator in Hawaii, an American cowboy in Australia and the police commissioner in New York city?

A.  1:  Tom Selleck. He played Magnum PI set in Hawaii, Quigley in the movie Quigley Down Under and currently Frank Reagan the NYC Police Commissioner in the TV series Blue Bloods.

.

.

Q.  2:  What do you call a group of bears?

A.  2:  A ‘Sloth’.

.

.

Q.  3:  Which Eastern European city is known as the ‘City of a Hundred Spires’ ?  

A.  3:  Prague, the capital and largest city of the Czech Republic.

.

.

Q.  4:  Which country’s flag includes a cedar tree?

A.  4:  Lebanon.

.

.

Q.  5:  In which book does an alien invasion commence in Woking?

A.  5:  The War of the Worlds by H G Wells.

.

.

Q.  6:  Which subatomic particles are found in the nucleus of an atom?

A.  6:  Protons and Neutrons.

.

.

Q.  7:  Which sugar is found in milk?

A.  7:  Lactose.

.

.

Q.  8:  This one is the name of the largest species of big cat to be found in South America and a make of automobile?

A.  8:  Jaguar.

.

.

Q.  9:  What is the name given to the part of the Earth that lies between the outer core and the crust?

A.  9:  It is known as the ‘Mantle’.

.

.

Q. 10:  You see it on your cereal packet all the time, but Riboflavin is an alternative name for which vitamin of the B Group?

        a) Vitamin B1         b) Vitamin B2        c) Vitamin B3         d) Vitamin B12

A. 10:  The correct answer is b) Vitamin B2.

.

.

Q. 11:  Not part of the UK, but still known as British Crown Dependencies, the Channel Islands are situated in the English Channel just off the coast of France. You get a point for each of the four main islands in this group you can name correctly.

A. 11:  The four main islands in the Channel Islands group are: Jersey, Guernsey, Alderney and Sark.

.

.

Q. 12:  Which is the world’s tallest mammal?

A. 12:  The Giraffe. (By a neck!)

.

.

Q. 13:  ‘It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen,’ is the first line from which book?

A. 13:  1984 by George Orwell.

.

.

Q. 14:  What is the approximate diameter of Earth?

    a) 4,000 miles         b) 6,000 miles        c) 8,000 miles         d) 10,000 miles

A. 14:  The correct answer is c) 8,000 miles.

.

.

Q. 15:  What gifted actress played the part of an FBI trainee in the movie ‘Silence Of The Lambs’ and what was the name of the character she played? (A point for each correct answer.)

A. 15:  She is Jodie Foster and in The Silence Of The Lambs she played the part of Clarice Starling.

.

.

Q. 16:  What is the world’s smallest flightless bird?

A. 16:  The Kiwi.

.

.

Q. 17:  In the publishing industry what does the acronym ‘POD’ mean?

A. 17:  It means ‘Print on demand’.

.

.

Q. 18:  What color is a Himalayan poppy?

            a) Red              b) Yellow               c) Green               d) Blue

A. 18:  The correct answer is d) Blue.

.

.

Q. 19:  What flavour is Cointreau?

A. 19:  Orange.

.

.

Q. 20:  On which multi-million selling album would you find the Nasal Choir, Moribund Chorus and Girlie Chorus?

A. 20:  Tubular Bells by Mike Oldfield.

.

.

===============================

.

May The 4th Quiz Be With You.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

I don’t know what it is, but I can’t resist using that “May The Force Be With You” thing on this date. Sorry, but you’ll probably see another version of it next year if we’re all still around in the blogshpere.

But to get on with today’s real business, I do have another quiz for you.

The usual random selection and also as usual you can find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating.

Enjoy and good luck.

.

quiz01

.

Q.  1:  What word links vacations to the phonetic alphabet?

.

.

Q.  2:  What is the collective noun for a group of owls?

.

.

Q.  3:  ‘PL’ is the international car registration for which country?

.

.

Q.  4:  What city is also known as the ‘City of 72 Nations’ ?

.

.

Q.  5:  What is the highest score that can be awarded by a figure-skating judge?

            a) 2            b) 4            c) 6            d) 8            e) 10

.

.

Q.  6:  For what operation on the brain was Antonio de Egas Moniz of Portugal awarded the Nobel prize for medicine in 1949?

.

.

Q.  7:  Who was prime minster of China under Chairman Mao?

.

.

Q.  8:  Which literary characters set out on a journey from the Tabard Inn, Southwark?

.

.

Q.  9:  What is the brightest star in the night sky?

.

.

Q. 10:  Spain has many famous ‘costas’. A point for each one of the following you can name correctly the four below and a bonus point if you get them all.

 

Costa   _  _  _  _  _  _

Costa   _  _  _  _  _

Costa   _  _  _  _  _  _

Costa   _  _  _      _  _  _

.

.

Q. 11:  What name links the writers Kipling, Conrad and Heller?

.

.

Q. 12:  As well as being a girl’s best friend Diamonds are a form of which chemical element?

.

.

Q. 13:  What is the difference in paddles between canoeing and kayaking?

.

.

Q. 14:  In which country is Liberation of Saigon Day on April 30 a public holiday?

.

.

Q. 15:  What is created when the loop of a meander of a river is cut off and the river diverted on a different course?

.

.

Q. 16:  The number of voting representatives in the House of Representatives was fixed by law in 1911 at what number?

.

.

Q. 17:  What color is a Welsh poppy?

             a)  Blue            b) Yellow            c) Red            d) White

.

.

Q. 18:  How many valves does a trumpet have?

.

.

Q. 19:  Which is the only American state to begin with the letter ‘P’ ?

.

.

Q. 20:  Which band were Living Next Door to Alice in 1976?

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

ANSWERS

.

Q.  1:  What word links vacations to the phonetic alphabet?

A.  1:  Hotel.

.

.

Q.  2:  What is the collective noun for a group of owls?

A.  2:  A parliament.

.

.

Q.  3:  ‘PL’ is the international car registration for which country?

A.  3:  Poland.

.

.

Q. 4: What city is also known as the ‘City of 72 Nations’ ?

A.  4:  Tehran.

.

.

Q.  5:  What is the highest score that can be awarded by a figure-skating judge?

            a) 2            b) 4            c) 6            d) 8            e) 10

A.  5:  The correct answer is c) 6.

.

.

Q.  6:  For what operation on the brain was Antonio de Egas Moniz of Portugal awarded the Nobel prize for medicine in 1949?

A.  6:  Prefrontal lobotomy.

.

.

Q.  7:  Who was prime minster of China under Chairman Mao?

A.  7:  Chou En-Lai (or Zhou Enlai).

.

.

Q.  8:  Which literary characters set out on a journey from the Tabard Inn, Southwark?

A.  8:  The pilgrims in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales.

.

.

Q.  9:  What is the brightest star in the night sky?

A.  9:  Sirius (The Dog Star).

.

.

Q. 10:  Spain has many famous ‘costas’. A point for each one of the following you can name correctly the four below and a bonus point if you get them all.

Costa  _  _  _  _  _  _

Costa  _  _  _  _  _

Costa  _  _  _  _  _  _

Costa  _  _  _    _  _  _

A. 10:  The correct answers are Costa BLANCA, Costa BRAVA, Costa DORADA, and the Costa DEL SOL

.

.

Q. 11:  What name links the writers Kipling, Conrad and Heller?

A. 11:  The answer is ‘Joseph’. Joseph Conrad, Joseph Heller and although he was much better known as Rudyard Kipling his first name was also Joseph.

.

.

Q. 12:  As well as being a girl’s best friend Diamonds are a form of which chemical element?

A. 12:  Carbon.

.

.

Q. 13:  What is the difference in paddles between canoeing and kayaking?

A. 13:  Canoe paddles have a single face and Kayak paddles a double face.

.

.

Q. 14:  In which country is Liberation of Saigon Day on April 30 a public holiday?

A. 14:  Vietnam.

.

.

Q. 15:  What is created when the loop of a meander of a river is cut off and the river diverted on a different course?

A. 15:  Oxbow Lake.

.

.

Q. 16:  The number of voting representatives in the House of Representatives was fixed by law in 1911 at what number?

A. 16:  The number of voting representatives in the House of Representatives was fixed by law in 1911 at no more than 435, proportionally representing the population of the 50 states.

.

.

Q. 17:  What color is a Welsh poppy?

             a)  Blue            b) Yellow            c) Red            d) White

A. 17:  The correct answer is b) Yellow.

.

.

Q. 18:  How many valves does a trumpet have?

A. 18:  A trumpet has 3 valves.

.

.

Q. 19:  Which is the only American state to begin with the letter ‘p’?

A. 19:  Pennsylvania.

.

.

Q. 20:  Which band were Living Next Door to Alice in 1976?

A. 20:  Smokie.

.

.

========================================

.

Grab A Cup Of Coffee And A Croissant, It’s Quiz Time!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

A cup of coffee and a croissant is pleasant at any time, but particularly on the first morning of the week if you have a quiz to try.

The usual wide range of questions, some rather difficult in this selection.

But remember if you get stuck you can always find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating!

Enjoy and good luck.

 

Quiz 5

.

Q.  1:  What is ‘The Forbidden City’ better known as?

.

.

Q.  2:  What is the connection between the Academy Awards and the Phonetic Alphabet?

.

.

Q.  3:  Where are the breakfast delicacy of Croissants originally from?

.

.

Q.  4:  What sea creature has the largest eye of any animal? .

.

Q.  5:  What is studied in the science of cryogenics?

.

.

Q.  6:  What are motorways called in France?

.

.

Q.  7:  What business organization underwent a “big bang” in 1986?

.

.

Q.  8:  Which musical Roman Emperor was originally named Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus?

.

.

Q.  9:  ‘A Woman of Substance’, published in 1979, was a best-selling debut novel for which well-known writer?

.

.

Q. 10:  Named after a town in Surrey, England where a spring containing it was discovered, how is hydrated magnesium sulphate better known?

.

.

Q. 11:  Who killed Grendel and Grendel’s mother?

.

.

Q. 12:  What North American mammal has a black and white face mask and a bushy tail with between five and seven rings?

.

.

Q. 13:  Saint Paul’s Cathedral is in which European city?

.

.

Q. 14:  Who played John Walton Sr. in season 1 thru 8 and the six movie sequels of The Waltons? (Five bonus points if you can name the actor who played the role in the pilot for the series.)

.

.

Q. 15:  Where was a major treaty in the history of the EU signed in February 1992?

.

.

Q. 16:  In literature which 1719 book has gained wide acceptance as ‘the first English novel’ ?

.

.

Q. 17:  What is the state capital of Nebraska?

.

.

Q. 18:  Magnetite, hematite, limonite and siderite are ores of which metal?

.

.

Q. 19:  What color jersey is worn by the winners of each stage of the Tour De France?

.

.

Q. 20:  Name the director of the Lord of the Rings trilogy. 

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

ANSWERS

.

Q.  1:  What is ‘The Forbidden City’ better known as?

A.  1:  Beijing.

.

.

Q.  2:  What is the connection between the Academy Awards and the Phonetic Alphabet?

A.  2:  Oscar.

.

.

Q.  3:  Where are the breakfast delicacy of Croissants originally from?

A.  3:  They come from Vienna, Austria, NOT Paris, France.

.

.

Q.  4:  What sea creature has the largest eye of any animal?

A.  4:  The giant squid.

.

.

Q.  5:  What is studied in the science of cryogenics?

A.  5:  Very low temperatures.

.

.

Q.  6:  What are motorways called in France?

A.  6:  Autoroutes.

.

.

Q.  7:  What business organization underwent a “big bang” in 1986?

A.  7:  The London Stock Exchange.

.

.

Q.  8:  Which musical Roman Emperor was originally named Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus?

A.  8:  Nero.

.

.

Q.  9:  ‘A Woman of Substance’, published in 1979, was a best-selling debut novel for which well-known writer?

A.  9:  Barbara Taylor Bradford.

.

.

Q. 10:  Named after a town in Surrey, England where a spring containing it was discovered, how is hydrated magnesium sulphate better known?

A. 10:  Epsom salts.

.

.

Q. 11:  Who killed Grendel and Grendel’s mother?

A. 11:  Beowulf.

.

.

Q. 12:  What North American mammal has a black and white face mask and a bushy tail with between five and seven rings?

A. 12:  A Raccoon.

.

.

Q. 13:  Saint Paul’s Cathedral is in which European city?

A. 13:  London.

.

.

Q. 14:  Who played John Walton Sr. in season 1 thru 8 and the six movie sequels of The Waltons? (Five bonus points if you can name the actor who played the role in the pilot for the series.)

A. 14:  Ralph Waite was the actor who played John Walton Sr. in seasons 1 thru 8 and the six movie sequels. For your five bonus points, Andrew Duggan played the role in the pilot.

.

.

Q. 15:  Where was a major treaty in the history of the EU signed in February 1992?

A. 15:  Maastricht.

.

.

Q. 16:  In literature which 1719 book has gained wide acceptance as ‘the first English novel’?

A. 16:  Robinson Crusoe.

.

.

Q. 17:  What is the state capital of Nebraska?

A. 17:  Lincoln.

.

.

Q. 18:  Magnetite, hematite, limonite and siderite are ores of which metal?

A. 18:  Iron.

.

.

Q. 19:  What color jersey is worn by the winners of each stage of the Tour De France?

A. 19:  Yellow.

.

.

Q. 20:  Name the director of the Lord of the Rings trilogy. 

A. 20:  Peter Jackson. .

.

============================= .

It’s The Movie, Math And Mud Quiz!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

Welcome to this week’s quiz.

Movies, math and mud do feature, as do many other topics.

Is it easy? Is it difficult? Depends on how many answers you know.

But don’t worry, if you get stuck you can find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating.

Enjoy and good luck.

.

quiz host

.

Q.  1:  What is the official language of the United States of America?

.

.

Q.  2:  What bird has only two toes on each foot?

.

.

Q.  3:  On which river are the Victoria Falls to be found?

.

.

Q.  4:  What city is known as ‘Muddy York’ ?

.

.

Q.  5:  What type of creature is a Devil’s Coachhorse?

.

.

Q.  6:  The Lakota call it the Battle of the Greasy Grass. What do we know it better as?

.

.

Q.  7:  What town is also known worldwide as the “home of golf” ?

.

.

Q.  8:  The Bennet family appear in which famous Jane Austen novel?

.

.

Q.  9:  What is the mathematical series that starts 0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21 called?

.

.

Q. 10:  ‘Alopecia’ is a condition causing the loss of what from the body?

.

.

Q. 11:  What is the device, used mainly nowadays on small engines like those found on lawnmowers, that blends air and fuel for an internal combustion engine called?

.

.

Q. 12:  What is the usual color of copper sulphate?

.

.

Q. 13:  Which form of cloud has an anvil shape and is associated with heavy showers and storms?

.

.

Q. 14:  What is defined as “Any rock or soil material that has remained below 0°C continuously for two or more years” ?

.

.

Q. 15:  Which insect found in Africa is the host for the parasitic organism that causes sleeping sickness?

.

.

Q. 16:  An Astronomical Unit is the mean distance between which two bodies?

.

.

Q. 17:  How is the fossilized resin of coniferous trees from the Middle Tertiary period better known?

.

.

Q. 18:  Which son of a weaver was a major benefactor of public libraries throughout the UK and US?

.

.

Q. 19:  Where would you be in if you were at the Cresta Run? (A point each for correctly naming the town and the country.)

.

.

Q. 20:  In which movie did Humphrey Bogart say, “We’ll always have Paris”

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

ANSWERS

.

Q.  1:  What is the official language of the United States of America?

A.  1:  A bit of a trick question to start with, the United States has no official language.

.

.

Q.  2:  What bird has only two toes on each foot?

A.  2:  An Ostrich.

.

.

Q.  3:  On which river are the Victoria Falls to be found?

A.  3:  The Zambezi.

.

.

Q.  4:  What city is known as ‘Muddy York’ ?

A.  4:  Toronto.

.

.

Q.  5:  What type of creature is a Devil’s Coachhorse?

A.  5:  It is a Beetle.

.

.

Q.  6:  The Lakota call it the Battle of the Greasy Grass. What do we know it better as?

A.  6:  We know it better as the Battle of Little Big Horn.

.

.

Q.  7:  What town is also known worldwide as the “home of golf” ?

A.  7:  St. Andrews, Scotland.

.

.

Q.  8:  The Bennet family appear in which famous Jane Austen novel?

A.  8:  Pride & Prejudice.

.

.

Q.  9:  What is the mathematical series that starts 0,1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21 called?

A.  9:  A Fibonacci Series.

.

.

Q. 10:  ‘Alopecia’ is a condition causing the loss of what from the body?

A. 10:  Hair.

.

.

Q. 11:  What is the device, used mainly nowadays on small engines like those found on lawnmowers, that blends air and fuel for an internal combustion engine called?

A. 11:  A carburetor, or carburetor.

.

.

Q. 12:  What is the usual color of copper sulphate?

A. 12:  Blue.

.

.

Q. 13:  Which form of cloud has an anvil shape and is associated with heavy showers and storms?

A. 13:  Cumulonimbus.

.

.

Q. 14:  What is defined as “Any rock or soil material that has remained below 0°C continuously for two or more years” ?

A. 14:  Permafrost.

.

.

Q. 15:  Which insect found in Africa is the host for the parasitic organism that causes sleeping sickness?

A. 15:  The Tsetse fly.

.

.

Q. 16:  An Astronomical Unit is the mean distance between which two bodies?

A. 16:  The earth and the sun.

.

.

Q. 17:  How is the fossilised resin of coniferous trees from the Middle Tertiary period better known?

A. 17:  Amber.

.

.

Q. 18:  Which son of a weaver was a major benefactor of public libraries throughout the UK and US?

A. 18:  Andrew Carnegie.

.

.

Q. 19:  Where would you be in if you were at the Cresta Run? (A point each for correctly naming the town and the country.)

A. 19:  You would be in the winter sports town of St. Moritz, Switzerland.

.

.

Q. 20:  In which movie did Humphrey Bogart say, “We’ll always have Paris”? 

A. 20:  The line is from the fantastic movie ‘Casablanca’.

.

.

==============================

.

Pioneers, People And Places – It’s Quiz Day!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Welcome to another week and another fasab quiz.

Today is the usual random mixture of questions, including as the title suggests, some about pioneers, people and places.

If you get stuck you can find the answers as usual waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating!

Enjoy and good luck.

.quiz 8

 

.

Q.  1:  Which US state is nick-named the ‘Empire State’ ?

.

.

Q.  2:  What sort of creature is a ‘serval’ ?

.

.

Q.  3:  What city is known as the ‘Capital of the Alps’ ?

.

.

Q.  4:  What African tribe represents a letter in the phonetic alphabet?

.

.

Q.  5:  What color are the flowers of the laburnum tree?

            a)  red            b) yellow           c) blue            d) cream

.

.

Q.  6:  Which chemical element has the symbol ‘Fe’ ?

.

.

Q.  7:  What is the only bird capable of flying all day without flapping its wings?

.

.

Q.  8:  How many sides does a rhombus have?

.

.

Q.  9:  Which small shark is also known as a ‘rock-eel’ or ‘rock Salmon’ ?

.

.

Q. 10:  What is the capital of the Falkland Islands?

.

.

Q. 11:  How many balls are on a snooker table at the start of play?

.

.

Q. 12:  In physics, what letter is used to represent the constant that is equal to “9.80665 metres per second squared” ?

.

.

Q. 13:  Who was the United States’ ‘Action Man’ ?

.

.

Q. 14:  What name was given to the women who campaigned to have the vote in the first two decades of the 20th century?

.

.

Q. 15:  What was the fishing dispute between Britain and Iceland during the 1960s and 1970s popularly known as?

.

.

Q. 16:  Founded in 1413, what is Scotland’s oldest university?

.

.

Q. 17:  Who pioneered vaccination as a means of inoculating against smallpox?

.

.

Q. 18:  SS Archimedes was an appropriately named ship which was the world’s first to use what form of propulsion?

.

.

Q. 19:  Julia Margaret Cameron was an early pioneer of which art form?

.

.

Q. 20:  For which Henrik Ibsen play, first performed in 1876, did Edvard Grieg compose the instrumental music?

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

ANSWERS

.

Q.  1:  Which US state is nick-named the ‘Empire State’ ?

A.  1:  New York.

.

.

Q.  2:  What sort of creature is a ‘serval’ ?

A.  2:  A Wildcat.

.

.

Q.  3:  What city is known as the ‘Capital of the Alps’ ?

A.  3:  Grenoble.

.

.

Q.  4:  What African tribe represents a letter in the phonetic alphabet?

A.  4:  Zulu, representing the letter ‘Z’.

.

.

Q.  5:  What color are the flowers of the laburnum tree?

            a)  red            b) yellow           c) blue            d) cream

A.  5:  The correct answer is b) yellow.

.

.

Q.  6:  Which chemical element has the symbol ‘Fe’ ?

A.  6:  Iron.

.

.

Q.  7:  What is the only bird capable of flying all day without flapping its wings?

A.  7:  The Albatross.

.

.

Q.  8:  How many sides does a rhombus have?

A.  8:  A rhombus has 4 sides.

.

.

Q.  9:  Which small shark is also known as a ‘rock-eel’ or ‘rock Salmon’ ?

A.  9:  Dogfish.

.

.

Q. 10:  What is the capital of the Falkland Islands?

A. 10:  Port Stanley.

.

.

Q. 11:  How many balls are on a snooker table at the start of play?

A. 11:  22. (15 reds, 1 yellow, 1 green, 1 brown, 1 blue, 1 pink, 1 black and the cue ball.)

.

.

Q. 12:  In physics, what letter is used to represent the constant that is equal to “9.80665 metres per second squared” ?

A. 12:  It is the letter ‘G’ (constant is Earth’s gravity pull, the acceleration of free fall)

.

.

Q. 13:  Who was the United States’ ‘Action Man’ ?

A. 13:  He was called ‘G.I. Joe’.

.

.

Q. 14:  What name was given to the women who campaigned to have the vote in the first two decades of the 20th century?

A. 14:  They were known as ‘Suffragettes’.

.

.

Q. 15:  What was the fishing dispute between Britain and Iceland during the 1960s and 1970s popularly known as?

A. 15:  It was known as ‘The Cod War’.

.

.

Q. 16:  Founded in 1413, what is Scotland’s oldest university?

A. 16:  It is the University of St Andrews.

.

.

Q. 17:  Who pioneered vaccination as a means of inoculating against smallpox?

A. 17:  Edward Jenner.

.

.

Q. 18:  SS Archimedes was an appropriately named ship which was the world’s first to use what form of propulsion?

A. 18:  A Screw Propeller.

.

.

Q. 19:  Julia Margaret Cameron was an early pioneer of which art form?

A. 19:  Photography.

.

.

Q. 20:  For which Henrik Ibsen play, first performed in 1876, did Edvard Grieg compose the instrumental music?

A. 20:  Peer Gynt.

.

.

===================================

.