Land Yourself A Lot Of Points In Today’s Quiz!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Yes, there is the opportunity to land yourself with a lot of points in today’s quiz, but some of the questions are quite difficult too so don’t be over confidant.

However, don’t worry, if you get stuck you can always find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating!

Enjoy and good luck.

.

Quiz 07

.

Q.  1:  How many legs has a tarantula?

.

.

Q.  2:  ‘Zn’ is the symbol of which chemical element?

.

.

Q.  3:  What name is given to a baby elephant?

.

.

Q.  4:  What is the smallest bone in the body and where is it located? (A point for each correct answer.)

.

.

Q.  5:  What is the fahrenheit equivalent of 20 degrees centigrade?

.

.

Q.  6:  What city is known as ‘The City of Lilies’ ?

.

.

Q.  7:  Who was famous for his theory of gravity and 3 laws of motion?

.

.

Q.  8:  What is the most common transplant operation?

.

.

Q.  9:  What is the major element of the diet of the Koala bear?

.

.

Q. 10:  And in a related question, what is the major element of the diet of the wild giant panda?

.

.

Q. 11:  Which gas is responsible for global warming?

.

.

Q. 12:  The Ross and Weddell Seas are to be found off the shore of which continent?

.

.

Q. 13:  Now for a mega-point question. Listed below (in alphabetical order) are ten countries ending in the word ‘land’. A point for each one you can name correctly.

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _   _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _   _ _ _ _ _ _ L A N D _

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ L A N D

.

.

Q. 14:  Who led the Seventh Cavalry to its doom at the Battle of Little Bighorn?

.

.

Q. 15:  John Flamsteed was the first holder of which far-sighted post, created in 1675?

.

.

Q. 16:  What term is given to the technique where paint is mixed and bound with egg yolk?

.

.

Q. 17:  What was launched by Pope Urban II at the Council of Clermont in 1095?

.

.

Q. 18:  Who went on a circumnavigation of the world from the Reform Club as the result of a bet?

.

.

Q. 19:  Which New Zealand-born physicist is credited with splitting the atom?

.

.

Q. 20:  Which motoring aid was invented by Percy Shaw?

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

ANSWERS

.

Q.  1:  How many legs has a tarantula?

A.  1:  Eight.

.

.

Q.  2:  ‘Zn’ is the symbol of which chemical element?

A.  2:  Zinc.

.

.

Q.  3:  What name is given to a baby elephant?

A.  3:  A baby elephant is called a ‘Calf’.

.

.

Q.  4:  What is the smallest bone in the body and where is it located? (A point for each correct answer.)

A.  4:  It is called the ‘Stirrup’ and it is located in the ear.

.

.

Q.  5:  What is the fahrenheit equivalent of 20 degrees centigrade?

A.  5:  20 degrees centigrade is 68 degrees Fahrenheit.

.

.

Q.  6:  What city is known as ‘The City of Lilies’ ?

A.  6:  Florence.

.

.

Q.  7:  Who was famous for his theory of gravity and 3 laws of motion?

A.  7:  Sir Isaac Newton.

.

.

Q.  8:  What is the most common transplant operation?

A.  8:  The Bone graft.

.

.

Q.  9:  What is the major element of the diet of the Koala bear?

A.  9:  Eucalyptus leaves.

.

.

Q. 10:  And in a related question, what is the major element of the diet of the wild giant panda?

A. 10:  A wild giant panda’s diet is almost exclusively (99 percent) bamboo.

.

.

Q. 11:  Which gas is responsible for global warming?

A. 11:  Carbon dioxide.

.

.

Q. 12:  The Ross and Weddell Seas are to be found off the shore of which continent?

A. 12:  Antarctica.

.

.

Q. 13:  Now for a mega-point question. Listed below (in alphabetical order) are ten countries ending in the word ‘land’. A point for each one you can name correctly.

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _   _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _   _ _ _ _ _ _ L A N D _

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ L A N D

A. 13:  The correct answers are:

            FINLAND

            ICELAND

            IRELAND

            NORTHERN IRELAND

            NEW ZEALAND

            THE NETHERLANDS

            POLAND

            SWAZILAND

            SWITZERLAND

            THAILAND.

.

.

Q. 14:  Who led the Seventh Cavalry to its doom at the Battle of Little Bighorn?

A. 14:  Lt-Col George Armstrong Custer.

.

.

Q. 15:  John Flamsteed was the first holder of which far-sighted post, created in 1675?

A. 15:  He was the first Astronomer Royal.

.

.

Q. 16:  What term is given to the technique where paint is mixed and bound with egg yolk?

A. 16:  It is known as ‘Tempera’.

.

.

Q. 17:  What was launched by Pope Urban II at the Council of Clermont in 1095?

A. 17:  The First Crusade.

.

.

Q. 18:  Who went on a circumnavigation of the world from the Reform Club as the result of a bet?

A. 18:  Phileas Fogg and his servant Passepartout (you get the point for naming Phileas Fogg correctly AND two posssible bonus points if you also knew the name of his servant. (From Jules Verne’s Around the World in Eighty Days).

.

.

Q. 19:  Which New Zealand-born physicist is credited with splitting the atom?

A. 19:  Sir Ernest Rutherford.

.

.

Q. 20:  Which motoring aid was invented by Percy Shaw?

A. 20:  He invented the reflectors known as ‘Cats eyes’, getting his inspiration when he saw a light reflecting off a cat’s eyes as it walked towards him. (British comedian Ken Dodd said that if the cat had been walking away from him he would probably have invented the pencil sharpener!)

.

==================================

.

Did You Know – More Facts For Fun.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Welcome to another selection of fasab’s facts for fun.

A more than random list of unusual facts that may come in handy some day. I wouldn’t count on it, but you never know. It has happened believe it or not!

So read on and enjoy.

.

did you know4

.

The only U.S. president to have been the head of a union

was Ronald Reagan,

a former president of the Screen Actors Guild.

Ronald Reagan at his desk

.

.

Just proving that not everybody is all bad,

“Pretty Boy” Floyd, one of America’s most notorious bank robbers,

was known for destroying mortgage papers,

consequently freeing hundreds of people from property debt.

gangster-pretty-boy-floyd-tote-bag

.

.

A man in China has kept himself alive with

a homemade dialysis machine for 13 years.

Home made dialysis machine

.

.

Divorce is legal in every nation in the world

except in the Philippines and in Vatican City.

divorce_pic1

.

.

In 1755 Benjamin Franklin organized the first

regular monthly mail packet service

between Falmouth, England, and New York,

and opened the first official post office in Canada

(in Halifax, Nova Scotia), to link Halifax with

the Atlantic colonies and the packet service to England.

Benjamin Franklin

.

.

About half the geysers on Earth

are located in Yellowstone National Park.

Old_Faithful_13

.

.

Your brain makes imaginary monsters when you stare in a mirror.

(Either that or you don’t look as good as you thought!)

cat and mirror

.

.

While most of it lies in Africa,

a small part of Egypt is located in Asia, as well.

Egypt_map

.

.

The White House has a variety of recreational facilities

available to its residents, including a tennis court, a jogging track,

swimming pool, movie theater, billiard room, and a bowling lane.

white-house

Click here to take an interactive tour

.

.

The Australian $5 to $100 notes are made of plastic.

aussie-money

.

.

A skunk’s smell can be detected by a human a mile away.

Skunk-in-Grass

.

.

The poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s wife died

when a dropped match ignited her enormous hoop skirt.

fanny-wadsworth

.

.

Alabama was the first state to

recognize Christmas as an official holiday.

Alabama Christmas

.

.

If your eyes are six feet above the surface of the ocean,

the horizon will be about three statute miles away.

hopes_on_the_horizon

.

.

The longest freshwater shoreline in the world

is located in the state of Michigan.

Michigan shoreline

.

.

Carbon monoxide is deadly.

It can kill a person in less than 15 minutes

carbon-monoxide-gas-safety

.

.

In 1876, the first microphone was invented by Emile Berliner.

emile_berliner

.

.

When Nadia Comaneci became the first gymnast

to score a perfect 10, the scoreboard wasn’t prepared.

Her score was reported as “1.00.”

Comaneci-1976

.

.

The accent that Mike Myers used for the character Shrek

came from the accent that his mother would use

when she was telling him bedtime stories when he was a child.

Shrek_fierce

.

.

Johnny Cash’s “A Boy Named Sue” was written by Shel Silverstein.

.

.

=======================================

.

If It’s Monday It Must Be Quiz Day!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Another chance to pit your wits against the fasab quiz archives with another random set of twenty questions.

Although there are one or two very easy ones, I think quite a lot of them are difficult this time, but here’s your chance to prove me wrong.

As always the answers are waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below – but NO cheating.

Enjoy and good luck!

.

quiz 10

.

Q.  1: What does the http:// in web URLs stand for?

.

.

Q.  2:  What is the hood ornament on a Rolls Royce called?

.

.

Q.  3:  Which former president of the United States, in his college days, worked as a male model, and even appeared on the cover of Cosmopolitan?

.

.

Q.  4:  In what country would you find the strangely named lakes “Titicaca” and “Poopo”?

.

.

Q.  5:  Sleeping through the winter is called “hibernation,” but what is the word that describes sleeping through hot and dry periods like summer?

.

.

Q.  6:  Members of the band “ZZ Top” are famous for their beards, but what was the surname of the only member who hadn’t got one?

.

.

Q.  7:  In 1918 the so-called “Spanish Flu” spread around the world killing tens of millions of people, but where did the outbreak start?

.

.

Q.  8:  Who was the only U.S. president never to sign a bill into law?

.

.

Q.  9:  On which continent are the 50 tallest mountains on Earth are all located? (This is easy if you think about it)

.

.

Q. 10:  Which world famous company’s name means “three oceans” in Japanese because the company’s founder wanted to sell his wares across the Indian, Atlantic, and Pacific oceans?

.

.

Q. 11:  How old was Albert Einstein, a genius if ever there was one, when he learned how to drive?

.

.

Q. 12:  What was the first ever registered domain name?

.

.

Q. 13:  What city is America’s skyscraper capital?

.

.

Q. 14:  Earlier this month the United States celebrated its birthday, but what is the only other country in the world to celebrate its birthday on July 4th?

.

.

Q. 15:  Who is O’Hare International Airport in Chicago, Illinois named after?

.

.

Q. 16:  The citizens of which country eat more donuts per capita than any other?

.

.

Q. 17:  What European country is the world’s leading exporter of false teeth?

.

.

Q. 18:  At more than 3.3 million square miles, what is the name of the world’s largest hot desert?

.

.

Q. 19:  We have all seen a Snellen Chart, but what is it?

.

.

Q. 20:  Possibly some of you have said “!#@%” when faced with a difficult question in this test, but what is the name for symbols such as “!#@%” that are used to indicate swearing in comic strips?

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

ANSWERS

.

Q.  1: What does the http:// in web URLs stand for?

A.  1:  The http:// in web URLs stands for “Hyper Text Transfer Protocol.”

.

.

Q.  2:  What is the hood ornament on a Rolls Royce called?

A.  2:  The Spirit of Ecstasy.

.

.

Q.  3:  Which former president of the United States in his college days, worked as a male model, and even appeared on the cover of Cosmopolitan?

A.  3:  Former president Gerald Ford wasn’t always gray-haired and paunchy — in his college days, he worked as a male model, and even appeared on the cover of Cosmopolitan.

.

.

Q.  4:  In what country would you find the strangely named lakes “Titicaca” and “Poopo”?

A.  4:  In Bolivia, South America.

.

.

Q.  5:  Sleeping through the winter is called “hibernation,” but what is the word that describes sleeping through hot and dry periods like summer?

A.  5:  Sleeping through hot and dry periods like summer is called “estivation.”

.

.

Q.  6:  Members of the band “ZZ Top” are famous for their beards, but what was the surname of the only member who hadn’t got one?

A.  6:  Ironically, the only member of ZZ Top without a beard has the last name Beard.

.

.

Q.  7:  In 1918 the so-called “Spanish Flu” spread around the world killing tens of millions of people, but where did the outbreak start?

A.  7:  The so-called “Spanish Flu” of 1918 started at a military camp in Kansas before spreading around the world and killing millions.

.

.

Q.  8:  Who was the only U.S. president never to sign a bill into law?

A.  8:  William Henry Harrison was the only U.S. president never to sign a bill into law — he died before having the opportunity.

.

.

Q.  9:  On which continent are the 50 tallest mountains on Earth are all located? (This is easy if you think about it)

A.  9:  Mount Everest, the tallest mountain on Earth is located in the Himalayas in Asia so since it has to be one of the 50 tallest mountains on Earth, they all have to be located in Asia.

.

.

Q. 10:  Which world famous company’s name means “three oceans” in Japanese because the company’s founder wanted to sell his wares across the Indian, Atlantic, and Pacific oceans?

A. 10:  Sanyo means “three oceans” in Japanese.

.

.

Q. 11:  How old was Albert Einstein, a genius if ever there was one, when he learned how to drive?

A. 11:  Albert Einstein never learned how to drive.

.

.

Q. 12:  What was the first ever registered domain name?

A. 12:  The first registered domain name was symbolics.com. It was registered on March 15th, 1985.

.

.

Q. 13:  What city is America’s skyscraper capital?

A. 13:  Chicago is America’s skyscraper capital. The city has more 1,000-foot tall buildings than any other U.S. city.

.

.

Q. 14:  Earlier this month the United States celebrated its birthday, but what is the only other country in the world to celebrate its birthday on July 4th?

A. 14:  The only other country in the world to celebrate the United States’ birthday, July 4th, is Denmark.

.

.

Q. 15:  Who is O’Hare International Airport in Chicago, Illinois named after?

A. 15:  O’Hare International Airport in Chicago, Illinois is named after Al Capone’s lawyer’s son, Lt. Cmdr. Butch O’Hare.

.

.

Q. 16:  The citizens of which country eat more donuts per capita than any other?

A. 16:  Canadians eat more donuts per capita than any other country.

.

.

Q. 17:  What European country is the world’s leading exporter of false teeth?

A. 17:  Liechtenstein is the world’s leading exporter of false teeth.

.

.

Q. 18:  At more than 3.3 million square miles, what is the name of the world’s largest hot desert?

A. 18:  At more than 3.3 million square miles, the Sahara Desert is as large as the world’s next 20 largest hot deserts combined.

.

.

Q. 19:  We have all seen a Snellen Chart, but what is it?

A. 19:  The eye test chart with the big ‘E’ on top is known as the Snellen Chart.

.

.

Q. 20:  Possibly some of you have said “!#@%” when faced with a difficult question in this test, but what is the name for symbols such as “!#@%” that are used to indicate swearing in comic strips?

A. 20:  Symbols such as “!#@%” that are used to indicate swearing in comic strips are called grawlix.

=======================================

.