Movies, Music And Murder In Today’s Quiz.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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Yes, movies, music and murder all appear in today’s quiz.

Lots of other subjects too.

And as usual, if you get stuck, you can find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating!

Enjoy and good luck.

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puzzle, test, exam. quiz, assessment

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Q.  1:  Who was assassinated at the theater by John Wilkes Booth?

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Q.  2:  What is the most abundant substance found in the plant kingdom?

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Q.  3:  What well known city in the Far East is known as ‘The Lion City’ ?

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Q.  4:  Who discovered the law that the volume of a given mass of gas at a constant temperature is inversely proportional to its pressure?

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Q.  5:  What type of creature is a Pacific sea wasp?

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Q.  6:  Which of Napoleon’s victories had a chicken dish named after it?

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Q.  7:  In which country is the port of Fray Bentos?

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Q.  8:  What was the name of the English galleon best known for her circumnavigation of the globe between 1577 and 1580, captained by Sir Francis Drake?

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Q.  9:  English novelist John Meade Falkner, not to be confused with the famous American author John Faulkner, published three novels. ‘The Nebuly Coat’ was one of them, you get a point for each of the other two you can name correctly and two bonus points if you get both of them correct.

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Q. 10:  What are the only two numbers on a dartboard to lie between two odd ones?

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Q. 11:  What wind is a warm southerly coming from the Sahara Desert over the Mediterranean?

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Q. 12:  What is the largest flat fish species?

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Q. 13:  Which Washington D.C. born oscar-winning actress wrote ‘A Lotus Grows in the Mud’ ?

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Q. 14:  Kareem Abdul-Jabbar played 20 seasons in which sport?

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Q. 15:  What item of clothing was named after its Scottish inventor?

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Q. 16:  On which continent would you find the world’s most ancient forest?

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Q. 17:  Bray Studios, near Windsor in Berkshire, England was home to which famous brand of horror films? 

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Q. 18:  Which kind of flower bulbs were once exchanged as a form of currency?

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Q. 19:  Name the three primary colors.

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Q. 20:  What was the name of the song performed by Eton John, a revised version of which became a mega-hit after being sung live by Elton at Princess Diana’s funeral? A bonus point if you can also correctly name the sub-title given to the latter version.

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ANSWERS

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Q.  1:  Who was assassinated at the theater by John Wilkes Booth?

A.  1:  Abraham Lincoln.

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Q.  2:  What is the most abundant substance found in the plant kingdom?

A.  2:  Cellulose.

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Q.  3:  What well known city in the Far East is known as ‘The Lion City’ ?

A.  3:  Singapore.

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Q.  4:  Who discovered the law that the volume of a given mass of gas at a constant temperature is inversely proportional to its pressure?

A.  4:  Robert Boyle.

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Q.  5:  What type of creature is a Pacific sea wasp?

A.  5:  It is a Jellyfish.

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Q.  6:  Which of Napoleon’s victories had a chicken dish named after it?

A.  6:  Marengo.

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Q.  7:  In which country is the port of Fray Bentos?

A.  7:  In the South American country Uruguay.

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Q.  8:  What was the name of the English galleon best known for her circumnavigation of the globe between 1577 and 1580, captained by Sir Francis Drake?

A.  8:  It was the Golden Hind or Golden Hinde.

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Q.  9:  English novelist John Meade Falkner, not to be confused with the famous American author John Faulkner, published three novels. ‘The Nebuly Coat’ was one of them, you get a point for each of the other two you can name correctly and two bonus points if you get both of them correct.

A.  9:  They are ‘The Lost Stradivarius’ and ‘Moonfleet’.

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Q. 10:  What are the only two numbers on a dartboard to lie between two odd ones?

A. 10:  3 and 19 (there is a run of four odd numbers around the bottom – 17,3,19,7, nowhere else is there a run of more than 2 consecutive odd or even numbers).

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Q. 11:  What wind is a warm southerly coming from the Sahara Desert over the Mediterranean?

A. 11:  Sirocco.

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Q. 12:  What is the largest flat fish species?

A. 12:  Halibut.

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Q. 13:  Which Washington D.C. born oscar-winning actress wrote ‘A Lotus Grows in the Mud’ ?

A. 13:  Goldie Hawn.

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Q. 14:  Kareem Abdul-Jabbar played 20 seasons in which sport?

A. 14:  Basketball.

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Q. 15:  What item of clothing was named after its Scottish inventor?

A. 15:  A mackintosh.

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Q. 16:  On which continent would you find the world’s most ancient forest?

A. 16:  In Australia specifically Daintree Forest, north of Cairns.

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Q. 17:  Bray Studios, near Windsor in Berkshire, England was home to which famous brand of horror films? 

A. 17:  Hammer Horror.

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Q. 18:  Which kind of flower bulbs were once exchanged as a form of currency?

A. 18:  Tulips.

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Q. 19:  Name the three primary colors.

A. 19:  Red, yellow and blue.

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Q. 20:  What was the name of the song performed by Eton John, a revised version of which became a mega-hit after being sung live by Elton at Princess Diana’s funeral? A bonus point if you can also correctly name the sub-title given to the latter version.

A. 20:  It was ‘Candle in the wind’. For your bonus point the sub-title for the revised version was ‘Goodbye England’s Rose’.

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Some Baby Facts Included Today.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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Yes, baby facts and a lot of grown up facts too in this selection.

Hope you find something of interest.

Enjoy.

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did you know2

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In spite of their crying sounds,

babies tears don’t begin to flow until they

are around 4 to 13 weeks old.

 baby crying

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Anne Parrish, an American writer was browsing

in a Paris bookstore one day when she came across

a book called, ‘Jack Frost and Other Stories’.

She began to tell her husband how she loved

the book when she was a child.

He took the book, opened it,

and inside the cover were written the words

“Anne Parish, 209 N Weber Street, Colorado”.

 Anne_Parrish,_children's_author,_head_shot

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The Titanic had its own newspaper

called The Atlantic Daily Bulletin.

 The Atlantic Daily Bulletin

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The term ‘Geek’ first showed up in northern Britain

in 1876, when it was used to refer to a fool.

Americans tweaked the meaning and by 1957 it meant

‘an unsociable and over-diligent student’.

Of course, once computers turned up in the 80’s,

‘geek’ took on a second meaning as

‘an expert in computers or science’.

 Bill_Gates_Paul_Allen_1981

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The first modern lighter was invented by

German chemist Johann Wolfgang Dobereiner in 1823,

three years BEFORE the match was invented

by John Walker in England.

 Johann Wolfgang Dobereiner

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One of the most iconic military vehicles of all time has to

be the Willys MB Jeep, manufactured from 1941 to 1945.

This small four-wheel drive utility vehicle has

a maximum speed of up to 65 mph (105 km/h)

and an operational range of 300 miles (almost 500 km).

It was used by several countries in WWII,

including the US, UK, France and the Soviet Union.

 Willys MB Jeep

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Technically Europe is not a continent,

it’s separation from Asia was actually a Greek idea.

 Europe map

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While filming Lord of the Rings

in the mountains of New Zealand,

Sean Bean refused a helicopter ride to a set

that was high in the mountains

due to his fear of flying.

He instead hiked up to the set

in his full Boromir armor

every day that they shot up there.

 boromir

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In Indonesia the government has restricted some

lanes of traffic to only cars with 3 or more people

to try to cut down overcrowding on the roads.

Some poor people from the city outskirts

take advantage of this law by offering drivers a

Professional Hitchhiker service,

so they can drive in the fast lanes.

 Indonesia traffic jam

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Genghis Khan believed that a man could be measured

by the number of children he fathered

and consequently his harem included thousands of

women with whom he had a great many children.

So many, in fact, that geneticists have found

that roughly 8% of men in Asia carry his genetic legacy

in their Y-chromosome.

 Genghis Khan  descendents map

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127,000 trees are chopped down every day

in order to keep up with the global demand

for toilet paper.

Holy S***!!!

 toilet paper

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The original ER movie was to be directed

by Steven Spielberg until he became more interested

in another of Crichton’s projects: Jurassic Park.

Spielberg Jurassic Park

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Land Yourself A Lot Of Points In Today’s Quiz!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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Yes, there is the opportunity to land yourself with a lot of points in today’s quiz, but some of the questions are quite difficult too so don’t be over confidant.

However, don’t worry, if you get stuck you can always find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating!

Enjoy and good luck.

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Quiz 07

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Q.  1:  How many legs has a tarantula?

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Q.  2:  ‘Zn’ is the symbol of which chemical element?

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Q.  3:  What name is given to a baby elephant?

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Q.  4:  What is the smallest bone in the body and where is it located? (A point for each correct answer.)

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Q.  5:  What is the fahrenheit equivalent of 20 degrees centigrade?

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Q.  6:  What city is known as ‘The City of Lilies’ ?

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Q.  7:  Who was famous for his theory of gravity and 3 laws of motion?

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Q.  8:  What is the most common transplant operation?

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Q.  9:  What is the major element of the diet of the Koala bear?

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Q. 10:  And in a related question, what is the major element of the diet of the wild giant panda?

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Q. 11:  Which gas is responsible for global warming?

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Q. 12:  The Ross and Weddell Seas are to be found off the shore of which continent?

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Q. 13:  Now for a mega-point question. Listed below (in alphabetical order) are ten countries ending in the word ‘land’. A point for each one you can name correctly.

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _   _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _   _ _ _ _ _ _ L A N D _

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ L A N D

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Q. 14:  Who led the Seventh Cavalry to its doom at the Battle of Little Bighorn?

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Q. 15:  John Flamsteed was the first holder of which far-sighted post, created in 1675?

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Q. 16:  What term is given to the technique where paint is mixed and bound with egg yolk?

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Q. 17:  What was launched by Pope Urban II at the Council of Clermont in 1095?

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Q. 18:  Who went on a circumnavigation of the world from the Reform Club as the result of a bet?

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Q. 19:  Which New Zealand-born physicist is credited with splitting the atom?

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Q. 20:  Which motoring aid was invented by Percy Shaw?

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ANSWERS

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Q.  1:  How many legs has a tarantula?

A.  1:  Eight.

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Q.  2:  ‘Zn’ is the symbol of which chemical element?

A.  2:  Zinc.

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Q.  3:  What name is given to a baby elephant?

A.  3:  A baby elephant is called a ‘Calf’.

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Q.  4:  What is the smallest bone in the body and where is it located? (A point for each correct answer.)

A.  4:  It is called the ‘Stirrup’ and it is located in the ear.

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Q.  5:  What is the fahrenheit equivalent of 20 degrees centigrade?

A.  5:  20 degrees centigrade is 68 degrees Fahrenheit.

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Q.  6:  What city is known as ‘The City of Lilies’ ?

A.  6:  Florence.

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Q.  7:  Who was famous for his theory of gravity and 3 laws of motion?

A.  7:  Sir Isaac Newton.

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Q.  8:  What is the most common transplant operation?

A.  8:  The Bone graft.

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Q.  9:  What is the major element of the diet of the Koala bear?

A.  9:  Eucalyptus leaves.

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Q. 10:  And in a related question, what is the major element of the diet of the wild giant panda?

A. 10:  A wild giant panda’s diet is almost exclusively (99 percent) bamboo.

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Q. 11:  Which gas is responsible for global warming?

A. 11:  Carbon dioxide.

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Q. 12:  The Ross and Weddell Seas are to be found off the shore of which continent?

A. 12:  Antarctica.

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Q. 13:  Now for a mega-point question. Listed below (in alphabetical order) are ten countries ending in the word ‘land’. A point for each one you can name correctly.

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _   _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _   _ _ _ _ _ _ L A N D _

            _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ _ _ _ L A N D

            _ _ _ _ L A N D

A. 13:  The correct answers are:

            FINLAND

            ICELAND

            IRELAND

            NORTHERN IRELAND

            NEW ZEALAND

            THE NETHERLANDS

            POLAND

            SWAZILAND

            SWITZERLAND

            THAILAND.

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Q. 14:  Who led the Seventh Cavalry to its doom at the Battle of Little Bighorn?

A. 14:  Lt-Col George Armstrong Custer.

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Q. 15:  John Flamsteed was the first holder of which far-sighted post, created in 1675?

A. 15:  He was the first Astronomer Royal.

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Q. 16:  What term is given to the technique where paint is mixed and bound with egg yolk?

A. 16:  It is known as ‘Tempera’.

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Q. 17:  What was launched by Pope Urban II at the Council of Clermont in 1095?

A. 17:  The First Crusade.

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Q. 18:  Who went on a circumnavigation of the world from the Reform Club as the result of a bet?

A. 18:  Phileas Fogg and his servant Passepartout (you get the point for naming Phileas Fogg correctly AND two posssible bonus points if you also knew the name of his servant. (From Jules Verne’s Around the World in Eighty Days).

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Q. 19:  Which New Zealand-born physicist is credited with splitting the atom?

A. 19:  Sir Ernest Rutherford.

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Q. 20:  Which motoring aid was invented by Percy Shaw?

A. 20:  He invented the reflectors known as ‘Cats eyes’, getting his inspiration when he saw a light reflecting off a cat’s eyes as it walked towards him. (British comedian Ken Dodd said that if the cat had been walking away from him he would probably have invented the pencil sharpener!)

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Quiz Time Again, Folks.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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Yes folks, it is quiz time again here at the fasab blog.

Last one for October.

So get your thinking caps on and try these questions out.

And as usual, if you get stuck, you can find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating.

Enjoy and good luck.

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quiz host

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Q.  1:  Who was the manager of the Beatles?

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Q.  2:  Approximately what proportion of the Earth’s surface is covered by a) land and b) water

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Q.  3:  What do you get if you divide 50 by half and add 40.

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Q.  4:  Frank Pantridge, born in Hillsborough, County Down, in Northern Ireland was famous for what?

          a) Discovery of the first radio pulsars   

          b) The development of the modern tractor

          c) Creating the ejector seat                          

          d) Introducing CPR to the world

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Q.  5:  What type of insect is a ‘velvet ant’?

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Q.  6:  What is the main ingredient of the dish ‘Welsh Rabbit’?

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Q.  7:  Why are 1968 pennies worth more than 1964 pennies?

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Q.  8:  What number is a hurricane on the Beaufort Scale?

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Q.  9:  From which continent did the guinea pig originate?

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Q. 10:  If  9 = 4,  21 = 9,  22 = 9,  24 = 10,  8 = 5,  7 = 5,  99 = 10,  and  100 = 7,  what do 16 and 17 equal?

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Q. 11:  What is the name of the investment company managed by billionaire Warren Buffet?

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Q. 12:  What does a ‘hippophobic’ fear?

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Q. 13:  ‘Galvanized’ iron or steel is coated with which other metal to help prevent rusting?

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Q. 14:  What is a ‘Natterjack’?

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Q. 15:  ‘Hydrolysis’ is the reaction of a chemical compound with what other compound?

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Q. 16:  What poisonous substance does the cassava root (used to make flour, breads, tapioca, a laundry starch, and an alcoholic beverage) contain?

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Q. 17:  This word is the name of a drink and a machine for separating cotton from its seed, what is it?

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Q. 18:  What is the nautical term for a length of 608 feet?

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Q. 19:  Which precious metal has the symbol ‘Pt’?

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Q. 20:  The size of a man’s foot is approximately the same size as which other body part?

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ANSWERS

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Q.  1:  Who was the manager of the Beatles?

A.  1:  Brian Epstein.

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Q.  2:  Approximately what proportion of the Earth’s surface is covered by a) land and b) water

A.  2:  One third land and two thirds water approximately.

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Q.  3:  What do you get if you divide 50 by half and add 40.

A.  3:  140.

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Q.  4:  Frank Pantridge, born in Hillsborough, County Down, in Northern Ireland was famous for what?

          a) Discovery of the first radio pulsars   

          b) The development of the modern tractor

          c) Creating the ejector seat                            

          d) Introducing CPR to the world

A.  4:  in the correct answer is d) Professor James Francis “Frank” Pantridge, MD, CBE was a physician and cardiologist from Northern Ireland who transformed emergency medicine and paramedic services with the invention of the portable defibrillator.

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Q.  5:  What type of insect is a ‘velvet ant’?

A.  5:  It is a Wasp. (Mutillidae are a family of more than 3,000 species of wasps whose wingless females resemble large, hairy ants.)

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Q.  6:  What is the main ingredient of the dish ‘Welsh Rabbit’?

A.  6:  Cheese (Welsh Rabbit – also called Welsh Rarebit – melted cheese on toast, which was an ironic reference to cheese being a poor man’s meat or rabbit).

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Q.  7:  Why are 1968 pennies worth more than 1964 pennies?  

A.  7:  Because 1968 pennies is $19.68 and 1964 is only $19.64.

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Q.  8:  What number is a hurricane on the Beaufort Scale?

A.  8:  12.

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Q.  9:  From which continent did the guinea pig originate?

A.  9:  South America.

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Q. 10:  If  9 = 4,  21 = 9,  22 = 9,  24 = 10,  8 = 5,  7 = 5,  99 = 10,  and  100 = 7,  what do 16 and 17 equal?

A. 10:  16 = 7 and 17 = 9 [The number of letters in the spelling of 16 (sixteen) is 7 and that of 17 (seventeen) is 9]

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Q. 11:  What is the name of the investment company managed by billionaire Warren Buffet?

A. 11:  It is called ‘Berkshire Hathaway’.

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Q. 12:  What does a ‘hippophobic’ fear?

A. 12:  Horses.

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Q. 13:  ‘Galvanized’ iron or steel is coated with which other metal to help prevent rusting?

A. 13:  Zinc.

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Q. 14:  What is a ‘Natterjack’?

A. 14:  A toad.

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Q. 15:  ‘Hydrolysis’ is the reaction of a chemical compound with what other compound?

A. 15:  Water.

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Q. 16:  What poisonous substance does the cassava root (used to make flour, breads, tapioca, a laundry starch, and an alcoholic beverage) contain?

A. 16:  It contains Cyanide.

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Q. 17:  This word is the name of a drink and a machine for separating cotton from its seed, what is it?

A. 17:  Gin.

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Q. 18:  What is the nautical term for a length of 608 feet?

A. 18:  It is called a ‘cable’.

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Q. 19:  Which precious metal has the symbol ‘Pt’?

A. 19:  Platinum.

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Q. 20:  The size of a man’s foot is approximately the same size as which other body part?

A. 20:  Oh for goodness sake have a bit of sense, it’s his forearm.

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Hope You Know Something About Camels – It’s Quiz Day!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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Strange how these things happen, but today’s quiz seems to feature camels.

Not to worry though, there is the usual random selection of questions to go along with that so you may do okay anyway.

As usual if you get stuck you can find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating.

Enjoy and good luck.

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quiz confused1

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Q.  1:  Which Ocean goes to the deepest depths?

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Q.  2:  What kind of animal is a ‘St Lucia Parrot’?

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Q.  3:  What is the common name of the stir-fried rice noodle dish commonly served as a street food or as meal in Thai restaurants.

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Q.  4:  Each year the Moon moves away from the Earth by what distance?

           (a)  two inches             (b)  two feet            (c)  two yards            (d)  two miles?

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Q.  5:  What do you call a triangle with two equal sides and equal opposite angles?

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Q.  6:  Where is the world’s largest aquarium located?

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Q.  7:  What continent do camels originally come from?

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Q.  8:  And on which continent do you find the most camels today?

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Q.  9:  What are the first and the last letters of the Greek Alphabet? (You need both answers to score a point.)

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Q. 10:  What does the chemical symbol ‘U’ represent?

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Q. 11:  What word is used to describe someone who is neither left handed nor right handed, but can use both hands with equal ease?

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Q. 12:  What type of insect is a ‘Spanish fly’?

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Q. 13:  What is 61 degrees Fahrenheit in degrees Celsius?

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Q. 14:  What allegedly happened to British scientist Sir Isaac Newton that made him think about his theory of universal gravitation?

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Q. 15:  The sum of two numbers is 53 and their difference is 9. What are the two numbers?

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Q. 16:  What two creatures are on the Australian coat of arms?

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Q. 17:  What planet in our solar system has the strongest surface winds?

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Q. 18:  What are sticks of blackboard chalk made from?

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Q. 19:  What is the wizard called ‘Olórin’ from ‘The Lord Of The Rings’ better known as?

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Q. 20:  How many colors are there in the rainbow?

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ANSWERS

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Q.  1:  Which Ocean goes to the deepest depths?

A.  1:  The Pacific Ocean.

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Q.  2:  What kind of animal is a ‘St Lucia Parrot’?

A.  2:  It’s a Parrot, from St Lucia. You coulda guessed it!

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Q.  3:  What is the common name of the stir-fried rice noodle dish commonly served as a street food or as meal in Thai restaurants.

A.  3:  It is called Pad Thai.

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Q.  4:  Each year the Moon moves away from the Earth by what distance?

           (a)  two inches             (b)  two feet            (c)  two yards            (d)  two miles?

A.  4:  The correct answer is (a)  two Inches.

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Q.  5:  What do you call a triangle with two equal sides and equal opposite angles?

A.  5:  It is known as an ‘Isosceles Triangle’.

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Q.  6:  Where is the world’s largest aquarium located?

A.  6:  At Disney World’s Epcot Center in Florida.

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Q.  7:  What continent do camels originally come from?

A.  7:  North America, not Africa.

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Q.  8:  And on which continent do you find the most camels today?

A.  8:  Australia.

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Q.  9:  What are the first and the last letters of the Greek Alphabet? (You need both to score a point.)

A.  9:  Alpha and Omega.

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Q. 10:  What does the chemical symbol ‘U’ represent?

A. 10:  Uranium.

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Q. 11:  What word is used to describe someone who is neither left handed nor right handed, but can use both hands with equal ease?

A. 11:  Ambidextrous.

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Q. 12:  What type of insect is a ‘Spanish fly’?

A. 12:  It is a ‘Beetle’.

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Q. 13:  What is 61 degrees Fahrenheit in degrees Celsius?

A. 13:  This is one of the easy ones to remember, just reverse the numbers, 61 degrees Fahrenheit is 16 degrees Celsius.

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Q. 14:  What allegedly happened to British scientist Sir Isaac Newton that made him think about his theory of universal gravitation?

A. 14:  The story goes that an apple fell on his head.

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Q. 15:  The sum of two numbers is 53 and their difference is 9. What are the two numbers?

A. 15:  22 and 31.

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Q. 16:  What two creatures are on the Australian coat of arms?

A. 16:  A Kangaroo and an Emu.

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Q. 17:  What planet in our solar system has the strongest surface winds?

A. 17:  Neptune. (If you guessed ‘Uranus’ you don’t get a point but I like the way you think.)

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Q. 18:  What are sticks of blackboard chalk made from?

A. 18:  Gypsum (Calcium Sulphate).

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Q. 19:  What is the wizard called ‘Olórin’ from ‘The Lord Of The Rings’ better known as?

A. 19:  He is better known as ‘Gandalf’.

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Q. 20:  How many colors are there in a rainbow?

A. 20:  Seven. Known as the spectral colors they are red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet.   What do you think, Peggy….

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Vlad The Bad?

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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The Sunday Sermon

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“It was the Russians, they’re the ones to blame.”

“It was Putin. He’s the baddie. We can’t let him get way with it!”

 malaysia-airlines-flight-mh17

So go the cries in the US in the aftermath of the shooting down of Air Malaysia Flight MH17 over the Ukraine.

And that was long before any of the facts had been collected and it was known who shot down a plane on a different continent, or why. 

Russia wants (virtual) control of the Ukraine. There isn’t really any doubt about that. For them it is a strategic imperative. Russia’s history has taught it that it needs to be able to control a vast amount of territory, if only to use as a buffer zone against invasion.

The situation is not helped by various US Presidents and Secretaries of State giving Russia assurances that they would not attempt to involve the peripheral former Soviet states in things like NATO – and then trying to do the exact opposite.

It is now widely accepted that the underlying reason for the unrest in the Ukraine and Russia’s reaction is because of US interference in that country, which included helping to overthrow its democratically elected president, Viktor Yanukovych, and replace him with someone who was a virtual puppet of the West.

That was just asking for trouble. And they should have known it.

And they will get trouble, probably much more than they bargained for.

Unfortunately that will impact on ordinary people, like us.

 Major_NATO_affiliations_in_Europe

Just as the US has its beady eyes on bringing the Ukraine and other former Soviet states into pro-Western organizations like NATO, it is equally certain that Putin will have his beady eyes on not only bringing the former Soviet states back firmly under Russian control, but in perhaps expanding his relationships with other parts of Europe.

Putin has the energy reserves to do it. Whilst there is very little in the way of direct trade between the US and Russia, particularly in regard to energy supplies, (Russia is just the United States’ 20th largest trading partner), Europe is largely dependent on Russian gas to keep it going. Over 30 percent of the European Union’s energy supplies come from Russia and the EU is Russia’s largest trading partner.

Russia’s counter strategy, therefore, will obviously be to use its considerable economic influence as leverage to try to break up the NATO alliance and to separate the European power house, Germany, from its Anglo-American alliance.

Putin is being helped by the arrogance of America’s government spooks who thought they could spy on their friends and allies, even going so far as tapping the phone of German Chancellor, Angela Merkel, without there being consequences.  

consequences

Prompted by leaks from NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, the fallout from America’s spying debacle continues, people have been arrested, and the German government has even ordered the local CIA station chief to pack his bags and leave the country.

Germany may still place some value on its relationship with the US, but not nearly so much as previously, thanks solely to America’s lack of respect for them.

Putin and his advisors know this, even if Obama and Kerry don’t. They see Germany as ready for change. And they may well be right. The German people are angry at the contempt America has shown for them  – just as Americans would rightly have been if the Germans had done the same to them and their President  –  and they are increasingly frustrated at the burden the European Union has become economically.

If the US doesn’t catch itself on and behave differently and with respect towards its foreign friends, it may find that there will be changes it did not expect and certainly did not want.

Kerry Putin Obama

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Did You Know? – A Foolish Fact Filled Tuesday!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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A foolish fact filled Tuesday?

I don’t know about that, but it is April Fool’s Day so anything is possible.

Nevertheless I hope there are at least a few things of interest in this lot.

Enjoy.

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did you know3

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Will Smith is now older than Uncle Phil

was at the beginning of “The Fresh Prince.”

will-smith-the-fresh-prince-of-bel-air

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There are more than 1,700 references to gems and

precious stones in the King James translation of the Bible.

precious stones

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Turning a clock’s hands counterclockwise

while setting it is not necessarily harmful.

It is only damaging when the timepiece

contains a chiming mechanism.

turning a clock's hands counterclockwise

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Cleopatra lived closer to the building

of Pizza Hut than the pyramids.

cleopatra

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Dentists have recommended that a toothbrush

be kept at least 6 feet (2 m) away from a toilet

to avoid airborne particles resulting from the flush.

Toothbrush and toilet

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South Africa has 11 official languages

– the most for a single country.

South Africa official languages

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The US has no official language.

(Comprende?)

us_language_melting_pot

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The citrus soda 7-UP was created in 1929;

“7” was selected because the original containers were 7 ounces.

“UP” indicated the direction of the bubbles.

7_up

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The highest point in Pennsylvania

is lower than the lowest point in Colorado.

colorado

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France was still executing people by guillotine

when Star Wars came out.

guillotine Star Wars

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The earliest recorded case

of a man giving up smoking was on April 5, 1679,

when Johan Katsu, Sheriff of Turku, Finland, wrote in his diary

“I quit smoking tobacco.”

He died one month later.

giving up smoking

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“Goodbye” came from “God bye”

which came from “God be with you.”

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Charlie Brown’s father was a barber.

Charlie-Browns-Dad-Was-A-Barber

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Every continent begins and ends in the same letter.

(I bet you never noticed that.)

Continents

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Every continent has a city called Rome.

(I bet you never noticed that either.)

Rome_title_card

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The Last Monday In July Means The Last Quiz For July!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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Welcome to another quiz day on the fasab blog.

As usual a random selection of questions, some quite difficult, but some that you should find easy enough.

When you are done check the answers which are waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below – but NO cheating!

Enjoy.

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Quiz 07

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Q.  1:  What is the name of the art form that translated means ‘beauty writing’?

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Q.  2:  The Blue Fairy is a kindly figure in which Disney classic? (Now you knows this!)

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Q.  3:  What is the name of the Spanish soup served cold?

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Q.  4:  What is the longest poisonous snake in the world?

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Q.  5:  Eric Weisz is still believed by some to have made the first successful powered flight in Australia on March 18, 1910. Weisz was better known around the world under which stage name?

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Q.  6:  Which region in the Pacific ocean is also the name of a character in the Dr. Doolittle stories?

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Q.  7:  What is the name of the world’s oldest licensed whiskey distillery and in which country is it located? (a point for each answer)

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Q.  8:  Contestants from which three countries have won the most Miss Universe titles? 

(Take some bonus points if you know how many titles they have won.)

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Q.  9:  Which word, used in the world of espionage, stems from John Le Carre’s 1974 novel ‘Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy’?

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Q. 10:  Kristal’ and ‘Krug’ are examples of which wine?

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Q. 11:  In space an ‘Event Horizon’ surrounds what kind of region?

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Q. 12:  Who was the first Hollywood actress to appear on a postage stamp?

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Q. 13:  When the definition of a desert is ‘an area with an average annual precipitation of less than 250 millimetres per year’; on which continent is the largest desert in the world?

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Q. 14:  Varig’ is the national airline in which country?

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Q. 15:  Name the American artist who uses Campbell’s Soup cans in his pop art?

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Q. 16:  What did American POW’s call the Hoa Lo prison camp in North Vietnam?

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Q. 17:  Widely used to orient buildings and even furniture, the term ‘Feng shui’, what is the English translation of this term? (Two words.)

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Q. 18:  Which breed of horse is also the name for a kind of bean?

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Q. 19:  Who was the only heavyweight champion to finish his boxing career with a perfect record? (49 wins-0 defeats).

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Q. 20:  Which film producer with a vegetable as a last name, was, until his death, involved in most of the James Bond films?

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ANSWERS

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Q.  1:  What is the name of the art form that translated means ‘beauty writing’?

A.  1:  Calligraphy.

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Q.  2:  The ‘Blue Fairy’ is a kindly figure in which Disney classic? (Now you knows this!)

A.  2:  Pinocchio.(Did you get the clue? ‘Knows’ = ‘nose’, whoops, not pun day, sorry!)

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Q.  3:  What is the name of the Spanish soup served cold?

A.  3:  Gazpacho.

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Q.  4:  What is the longest poisonous snake in the world?

A.  4:  The King Cobra.

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Q.  5:  Eric Weisz is still believed by some to have made the first successful powered flight in Australia on March 18, 1910. Weisz was better known around the world under which stage name?

A.  5:  Harry Houdini.

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Q.  6:  Which region in the Pacific ocean is also the name of a character in the Dr. Doolittle stories?

A.  6:  Polynesia. In the series of books, Polynesia is Doctor Dolittle’s parrot.

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Q.  7:  What is the name of the world’s oldest licensed whiskey distillery and in which country is it located? (a point for each answer)

A.  7:  Old Bushmills Distillery, located at Bushmills, County Antrim, Northern Ireland.

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Q.  8:  Contestants from which three countries have won the most Miss Universe titles? 

(Take some bonus points if you know how many titles they have won.)

A.  8:  USA (8: 1954, 1956, 1960, 1967, 1980, 1995, 1997, 2012),

Venezuela (6: 1979, 1981, 1986, 1996, 2008, 2009), and

Puerto Rico (5: 1970, 1985, 1993, 2001, 2006).

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Q.  9:  Which word, used in the world of espionage, stems from John Le Carre’s 1974 novel ‘Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy’?

A.  9:  Mole.

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Q. 10:  Kristal’ and ‘Krug’ are examples of which wine?

A. 10:  Champagne.

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Q. 11:  In space an ‘Event Horizon’ surrounds what kind of region?

A. 11:  A Black hole.

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Q. 12:  Who was the first Hollywood actress to appear on a postage stamp?

A. 12:  Grace Kelly.

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Q. 13:  When the definition of a desert is ‘an area with an average annual precipitation of less than 250 millimetres per year’; on which continent is the largest desert in the world?

A. 13:  The Antarctic. (Most people would say ‘The Sahara’ which is the largest ‘hot’ desert area in the world.)

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Q. 14:  Varig’ is the national airline in which country?

A. 14:  Brazil.

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Q. 15:  Name the American artist who uses Campbell’s Soup cans in his pop art?

A. 15:  Andy Warhol.

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Q. 16:  What did American POW’s call the Hoa Lo prison camp in North Vietnam?

A. 16:  The Hanoi Hilton.

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Q. 17:  Widely used to orient buildings and even furniture, the term ‘Feng shui’, what is the English translation of this term? (Two words.)

A. 17:  Feng shui translated into English means ‘Wind-Water’.

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Q. 18:  Which breed of horse is also the name for a kind of bean?

A. 18:  Pinto.

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Q. 19:  Who was the only heavyweight champion to finish his boxing career with a perfect record? (49 wins-0 defeats).

A. 19:  Rocky Marciano.

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Q. 20:  Which film producer with a vegetable as a last name, was, until his death, involved in most of the James Bond films?

A. 20:  Albert R (Cubby) Broccoli.

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So how did you do?

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If It’s Monday It Must Be Quiz Day!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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Another chance to pit your wits against the fasab quiz archives with another random set of twenty questions.

Although there are one or two very easy ones, I think quite a lot of them are difficult this time, but here’s your chance to prove me wrong.

As always the answers are waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below – but NO cheating.

Enjoy and good luck!

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quiz 10

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Q.  1: What does the http:// in web URLs stand for?

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Q.  2:  What is the hood ornament on a Rolls Royce called?

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Q.  3:  Which former president of the United States, in his college days, worked as a male model, and even appeared on the cover of Cosmopolitan?

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Q.  4:  In what country would you find the strangely named lakes “Titicaca” and “Poopo”?

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Q.  5:  Sleeping through the winter is called “hibernation,” but what is the word that describes sleeping through hot and dry periods like summer?

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Q.  6:  Members of the band “ZZ Top” are famous for their beards, but what was the surname of the only member who hadn’t got one?

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Q.  7:  In 1918 the so-called “Spanish Flu” spread around the world killing tens of millions of people, but where did the outbreak start?

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Q.  8:  Who was the only U.S. president never to sign a bill into law?

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Q.  9:  On which continent are the 50 tallest mountains on Earth are all located? (This is easy if you think about it)

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Q. 10:  Which world famous company’s name means “three oceans” in Japanese because the company’s founder wanted to sell his wares across the Indian, Atlantic, and Pacific oceans?

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Q. 11:  How old was Albert Einstein, a genius if ever there was one, when he learned how to drive?

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Q. 12:  What was the first ever registered domain name?

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Q. 13:  What city is America’s skyscraper capital?

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Q. 14:  Earlier this month the United States celebrated its birthday, but what is the only other country in the world to celebrate its birthday on July 4th?

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Q. 15:  Who is O’Hare International Airport in Chicago, Illinois named after?

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Q. 16:  The citizens of which country eat more donuts per capita than any other?

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Q. 17:  What European country is the world’s leading exporter of false teeth?

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Q. 18:  At more than 3.3 million square miles, what is the name of the world’s largest hot desert?

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Q. 19:  We have all seen a Snellen Chart, but what is it?

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Q. 20:  Possibly some of you have said “!#@%” when faced with a difficult question in this test, but what is the name for symbols such as “!#@%” that are used to indicate swearing in comic strips?

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ANSWERS

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Q.  1: What does the http:// in web URLs stand for?

A.  1:  The http:// in web URLs stands for “Hyper Text Transfer Protocol.”

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Q.  2:  What is the hood ornament on a Rolls Royce called?

A.  2:  The Spirit of Ecstasy.

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Q.  3:  Which former president of the United States in his college days, worked as a male model, and even appeared on the cover of Cosmopolitan?

A.  3:  Former president Gerald Ford wasn’t always gray-haired and paunchy — in his college days, he worked as a male model, and even appeared on the cover of Cosmopolitan.

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Q.  4:  In what country would you find the strangely named lakes “Titicaca” and “Poopo”?

A.  4:  In Bolivia, South America.

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Q.  5:  Sleeping through the winter is called “hibernation,” but what is the word that describes sleeping through hot and dry periods like summer?

A.  5:  Sleeping through hot and dry periods like summer is called “estivation.”

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Q.  6:  Members of the band “ZZ Top” are famous for their beards, but what was the surname of the only member who hadn’t got one?

A.  6:  Ironically, the only member of ZZ Top without a beard has the last name Beard.

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Q.  7:  In 1918 the so-called “Spanish Flu” spread around the world killing tens of millions of people, but where did the outbreak start?

A.  7:  The so-called “Spanish Flu” of 1918 started at a military camp in Kansas before spreading around the world and killing millions.

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Q.  8:  Who was the only U.S. president never to sign a bill into law?

A.  8:  William Henry Harrison was the only U.S. president never to sign a bill into law — he died before having the opportunity.

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Q.  9:  On which continent are the 50 tallest mountains on Earth are all located? (This is easy if you think about it)

A.  9:  Mount Everest, the tallest mountain on Earth is located in the Himalayas in Asia so since it has to be one of the 50 tallest mountains on Earth, they all have to be located in Asia.

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Q. 10:  Which world famous company’s name means “three oceans” in Japanese because the company’s founder wanted to sell his wares across the Indian, Atlantic, and Pacific oceans?

A. 10:  Sanyo means “three oceans” in Japanese.

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Q. 11:  How old was Albert Einstein, a genius if ever there was one, when he learned how to drive?

A. 11:  Albert Einstein never learned how to drive.

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Q. 12:  What was the first ever registered domain name?

A. 12:  The first registered domain name was symbolics.com. It was registered on March 15th, 1985.

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Q. 13:  What city is America’s skyscraper capital?

A. 13:  Chicago is America’s skyscraper capital. The city has more 1,000-foot tall buildings than any other U.S. city.

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Q. 14:  Earlier this month the United States celebrated its birthday, but what is the only other country in the world to celebrate its birthday on July 4th?

A. 14:  The only other country in the world to celebrate the United States’ birthday, July 4th, is Denmark.

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Q. 15:  Who is O’Hare International Airport in Chicago, Illinois named after?

A. 15:  O’Hare International Airport in Chicago, Illinois is named after Al Capone’s lawyer’s son, Lt. Cmdr. Butch O’Hare.

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Q. 16:  The citizens of which country eat more donuts per capita than any other?

A. 16:  Canadians eat more donuts per capita than any other country.

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Q. 17:  What European country is the world’s leading exporter of false teeth?

A. 17:  Liechtenstein is the world’s leading exporter of false teeth.

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Q. 18:  At more than 3.3 million square miles, what is the name of the world’s largest hot desert?

A. 18:  At more than 3.3 million square miles, the Sahara Desert is as large as the world’s next 20 largest hot deserts combined.

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Q. 19:  We have all seen a Snellen Chart, but what is it?

A. 19:  The eye test chart with the big ‘E’ on top is known as the Snellen Chart.

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Q. 20:  Possibly some of you have said “!#@%” when faced with a difficult question in this test, but what is the name for symbols such as “!#@%” that are used to indicate swearing in comic strips?

A. 20:  Symbols such as “!#@%” that are used to indicate swearing in comic strips are called grawlix.

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Quizday….Err… I mean, Monday 24th June!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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The clue was in the title.

Yes, it’s Monday, it must be quiz day on the fasab blog.

Here is another selection of mind benders.

Good luck and hope you enjoy!

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Quiz 6

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Q  1:  It is called a “ten gallon hat”, but how much does it really hold?

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Q  2:  In what country was paper invented?

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Q  3:  What is the smallest country in the world, with a population of 1000 and just 108.7 acres in area?

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Q  4:  What do Anteaters prefer to eat?

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Q  5:  What is the “thyroid cartilage” more commonly known as?

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Q  6:  In the 1960’s, who was the first rock star to be arrested on stage?

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Q  7:  What is the collective noun for a group of larks?

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Q  8:  What is the only continent that does not have land areas below sea level.

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Q  9:  The more you take the more you leave behind. What are they?

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Q 10:  The police can arrest you for attempting this crime, but strangely not for committing it. What is it?

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Q 11:  On a regular 12-hour digital clock how many times would the same three digits in a row be displayed in one day – for example, 1:11, 11:12, 12:22?

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Q 12:  What country is made up of approximately 7,100 islands?

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Q 13:  The mother of what star of “The Monkees” pop band invented whiteout?

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Q 14:  There are only four words in the English language that end in “dous”. Can you name any one of them? (A point for each.)

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Q 15:  What is the only English word with two synonyms (same meaning) which are antonyms (opposite meaning) of each other?

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Q 16:  In 1865, the U.S. Secret Service was first established for the specific purpose of combating what?

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Q 17:  The first TONKA truck was made when?  In 1937,  1947,  1957,  or 1967?

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Q 18:  Why did the Great Pyramids used to look as white as snow?

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Q 19:  Walter Hunt patented this common household item in 1849 and later sold the patent rights for only $400. What did he invent?

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Q 20:  The most expensive decorative egg that has ever been sold was the “Winter Egg” which went for $5.6 million in 1994. But who manufactured it?

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ANSWERS

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Q  1:  It is called a “ten gallon hat”, but how much does it really hold?

A  1:  A ten gallon hat actually holds three quarters of a gallon.

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Q  2:  In what country was paper invented?

A  2:  Paper was invented early in the second century in China by Chinese eunuch. (I guess he needed something to do!)

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Q  3:  What is the smallest country in the world, with a population of 1000 and just 108.7 acres in area?

A  3:  The Vatican City

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Q  4:  What do Anteaters prefer to eat?

A  4:  Yes, it was a tricky one, Anteaters prefer a meal of termites to ants.

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Q  5:  What is the “thyroid cartilage” more commonly known as?

A  5:  The “thyroid cartilage” is more commonly known as the “adams apple”.

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Q  6:  In the 1960’s, who was the first rock star to be arrested on stage?

A  6:  Jim Morrison of the rock group The Doors.

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Q  7:  What is the collective noun for a group of larks?

A  7:  A group of larks is known as an “exaltation”.

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Q  8:  What is the only continent that does not have land areas below sea level.

A  8:  Antarctica.

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Q  9:  The more you take the more you leave behind. What are they?

A  9:  Footsteps

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Q 10:  The police can arrest you for attempting this crime, but strangely not for committing it. What is it?

A 10:  Suicide

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Q 11:  On a regular 12-hour digital clock how many times would the same three digits in a row be displayed in one day – for example, 1:11, 11:12, 12:22?

A 11:  34 times. These 17 instances will be visible twice in a 24 hour period.  1:11 2:22 3:33 4:44 5:55 10:00 11:10 11:11 11:12 11:13 11:14 11:15 11:16 11:17 11:18 11:19 12:22

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Q 12:  What country is made up of approximately 7,100 islands?

A 12:  The Philippines

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Q 13:  The mother of what star of “The Monkees” pop band invented whiteout?

A 13:  Michael Nesmith’s mother invented whiteout.

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Q 14:  There are only four words in the English language that end in “dous”. Can you name any one of them? (A point for each.)

A 14:  The only four words in the English language that end in “dous” (as far as I know) are: “tremendous”, “horrendous”, “stupendous”, and “hazardous”.

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Q 15:  What is the only English word with two synonyms (same meaning) which are antonyms (opposite meaning) of each other?

A 15:  The verb “cleave” is the only English word with two synonyms (same meaning) which are antonyms (opposite meaning) of each other: adhere and separate.

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Q 16:  In 1865, the U.S. Secret Service was first established for the specific purpose of combatting what?

A 16:  In 1865, the U.S. Secret Service was first established for the specific purpose of combatting the counterfeiting of money.

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Q 17:  The first TONKA truck was made when?  In 1937  1947  1957  1967

A 17:  The first TONKA truck was made in 1947.

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Q 18:  Why did the Great Pyramids used to look as white as snow?

A 18:  The Great Pyramids used to look as white as snow because they were originally encased in a bright limestone that has worn off over the years.

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Q 19:  Walter Hunt patented this common household item in 1849 and later sold the patent rights for only $400. What did he invent?

A 19:  In 1849 Water Hunt invented and patented the safety pin.

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Q 20:  The most expensive decorative egg that has ever been sold was the “Winter Egg” which went for $5.6 million in 1994. But who manufactured it?

A 20:  The “Winter Egg” sold in 1994 for $5.6 million was made by Faberge.

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