Pioneers, People And Places – It’s Quiz Day!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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Welcome to another week and another fasab quiz.

Today is the usual random mixture of questions, including as the title suggests, some about pioneers, people and places.

If you get stuck you can find the answers as usual waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating!

Enjoy and good luck.

.quiz 8

 

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Q.  1:  Which US state is nick-named the ‘Empire State’ ?

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Q.  2:  What sort of creature is a ‘serval’ ?

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Q.  3:  What city is known as the ‘Capital of the Alps’ ?

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Q.  4:  What African tribe represents a letter in the phonetic alphabet?

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Q.  5:  What color are the flowers of the laburnum tree?

            a)  red            b) yellow           c) blue            d) cream

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Q.  6:  Which chemical element has the symbol ‘Fe’ ?

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Q.  7:  What is the only bird capable of flying all day without flapping its wings?

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Q.  8:  How many sides does a rhombus have?

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Q.  9:  Which small shark is also known as a ‘rock-eel’ or ‘rock Salmon’ ?

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Q. 10:  What is the capital of the Falkland Islands?

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Q. 11:  How many balls are on a snooker table at the start of play?

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Q. 12:  In physics, what letter is used to represent the constant that is equal to “9.80665 metres per second squared” ?

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Q. 13:  Who was the United States’ ‘Action Man’ ?

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Q. 14:  What name was given to the women who campaigned to have the vote in the first two decades of the 20th century?

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Q. 15:  What was the fishing dispute between Britain and Iceland during the 1960s and 1970s popularly known as?

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Q. 16:  Founded in 1413, what is Scotland’s oldest university?

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Q. 17:  Who pioneered vaccination as a means of inoculating against smallpox?

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Q. 18:  SS Archimedes was an appropriately named ship which was the world’s first to use what form of propulsion?

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Q. 19:  Julia Margaret Cameron was an early pioneer of which art form?

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Q. 20:  For which Henrik Ibsen play, first performed in 1876, did Edvard Grieg compose the instrumental music?

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ANSWERS

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Q.  1:  Which US state is nick-named the ‘Empire State’ ?

A.  1:  New York.

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Q.  2:  What sort of creature is a ‘serval’ ?

A.  2:  A Wildcat.

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Q.  3:  What city is known as the ‘Capital of the Alps’ ?

A.  3:  Grenoble.

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Q.  4:  What African tribe represents a letter in the phonetic alphabet?

A.  4:  Zulu, representing the letter ‘Z’.

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Q.  5:  What color are the flowers of the laburnum tree?

            a)  red            b) yellow           c) blue            d) cream

A.  5:  The correct answer is b) yellow.

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Q.  6:  Which chemical element has the symbol ‘Fe’ ?

A.  6:  Iron.

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Q.  7:  What is the only bird capable of flying all day without flapping its wings?

A.  7:  The Albatross.

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Q.  8:  How many sides does a rhombus have?

A.  8:  A rhombus has 4 sides.

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Q.  9:  Which small shark is also known as a ‘rock-eel’ or ‘rock Salmon’ ?

A.  9:  Dogfish.

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Q. 10:  What is the capital of the Falkland Islands?

A. 10:  Port Stanley.

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Q. 11:  How many balls are on a snooker table at the start of play?

A. 11:  22. (15 reds, 1 yellow, 1 green, 1 brown, 1 blue, 1 pink, 1 black and the cue ball.)

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Q. 12:  In physics, what letter is used to represent the constant that is equal to “9.80665 metres per second squared” ?

A. 12:  It is the letter ‘G’ (constant is Earth’s gravity pull, the acceleration of free fall)

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Q. 13:  Who was the United States’ ‘Action Man’ ?

A. 13:  He was called ‘G.I. Joe’.

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Q. 14:  What name was given to the women who campaigned to have the vote in the first two decades of the 20th century?

A. 14:  They were known as ‘Suffragettes’.

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Q. 15:  What was the fishing dispute between Britain and Iceland during the 1960s and 1970s popularly known as?

A. 15:  It was known as ‘The Cod War’.

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Q. 16:  Founded in 1413, what is Scotland’s oldest university?

A. 16:  It is the University of St Andrews.

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Q. 17:  Who pioneered vaccination as a means of inoculating against smallpox?

A. 17:  Edward Jenner.

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Q. 18:  SS Archimedes was an appropriately named ship which was the world’s first to use what form of propulsion?

A. 18:  A Screw Propeller.

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Q. 19:  Julia Margaret Cameron was an early pioneer of which art form?

A. 19:  Photography.

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Q. 20:  For which Henrik Ibsen play, first performed in 1876, did Edvard Grieg compose the instrumental music?

A. 20:  Peer Gynt.

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Time To Give Thanks For The Thanksgiving Quiz!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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Hello and welcome to another week at the fasab blog.

This week, for obvious reason, I’m on a Thanksgiving theme, so this week’s quiz is not the usual random mixture, but all about Thanksgiving and, of course, turkeys.

As usual, if you get stuck, you can find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating!

Enjoy and good luck.

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Turkey-Holding-Quiz-Sign

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Q.  1:  When was the first Thanksgiving celebration?

            a) 1535          b) 1598          c) 1621          d) 1686          e) 1751

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Q.  2:  What are the respective names of a female and a male turkey?  (A point for each correct answer, and a bonus point if you get them both right.)

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Q.  3:  Which U.S. president specified that Thanksgiving would fall on the last Thursday of November?

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Q.  4:  Which U.S. President attempted to move the Thanksgiving holiday to the fourth Thursday in November to create a longer Christmas shopping season?

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Q.  5:  What are the respective sounds made by a female and a male turkey?  (A point for each correct answer, and a bonus point if you get them both right.)

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Q.  6:  What Native American tribe celebrated the first Thanksgiving with the colonists?

            a)  Lakota            b) Apache          c) Wampanoag          d) Blackfoot

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Q.  7:  Approximately what percentage of American homes eats turkey on a) Thanksgiving and b) Christmas? (A point for each correct answer, and a bonus point if you get them both right.)

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Q.  8:  A three part, and possibly three point question, a) is Thanksgiving celebrated in any country other than the United States, and b) if so where, and c) when?  (A point for each correct answer.)

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Q.  9:  Which US state produces the most turkeys annually?

            a)  Ohio          b)  Indiana          c)  Minnesota          d)  Arkansas

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Q. 10:  The name of the famous rock where the pilgrims landed?

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Q. 11:  Where was the turkey first domesticated?

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Q. 12:  The original Thanksgiving lasted for how long?

           a)  1 day          b)  3 days          c)  5 days          d)  7 days

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Q. 13:  Which vegetable did the pilgrims have available for Thanksgiving but did not use because they thought it was poisonous?

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Q. 14:  What American statesman lobbied to make the turkey the national symbol?

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Q. 15:  What was the first departmental store that held a Thanksgiving parade?

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Q. 16:  What is the name of the skin that hangs from a turkey’s neck?

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Q. 17:  What do you call the day after Thanksgiving?

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Q. 18:  The inhabitants of which state are the largest consumers of turkey in the United States?

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Q. 19:  How many pilgrims were on the Mayflower and how long was the voyage from England to the New World? (A point for each correct answer, and a bonus point if you get them both right.)

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Q. 20:  Which country consumes the most turkey per year per capita?

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ANSWERS

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Q.  1:  When was the first Thanksgiving celebration?

            a) 1535          b) 1598          c) 1621          d) 1686          e) 1751

A.  1:  The correct answer is c) 1621.

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Q.  2:  What are the respective names of a female and a male turkey?  (A point for each correct answer, and a bonus point if you get them both right.)

A.  2:  A female turkey is a ‘hen’ and a male is a ‘tom’.

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Q.  3:  Which U.S. president specified that Thanksgiving would fall on the last Thursday of November?

A.  3:  Abraham Lincoln.

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Q.  4:  Which U.S. President attempted to move the Thanksgiving holiday to the fourth Thursday in November to create a longer Christmas shopping season?

A.  4:  Franklin D. Roosevelt.

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Q.  5:  What are the respective sounds made by a female and a male turkey?  (A point for each correct answer, and a bonus point if you get them both right.)

A.  5:  A female turkey says ‘cluck’ and a male turkey says ‘gobble’.

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Q.  6:  What Native American tribe celebrated the first Thanksgiving with the colonists?

            a)  Lakota            b) Apache          c) Wampanoag          d) Blackfoot

A.  6:  the Wampanoag tribe.

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Q.  7:  Approximately what percentage of American homes eats turkey on a) Thanksgiving and b) Christmas? (A point for each correct answer, and a bonus point if you get them both right.)

A.  7:  a) 90% of American homes eats turkey on Thanksgiving and b) 50% at Christmas.

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Q.  8:  A three part, and possibly three point question, a) is Thanksgiving celebrated in any country other than the United States and b) if so where and c) when?  (A point for each correct answer.)

A.  8:  Correct answers are,  a) Yes   b) in Canada, and   c) on the second Monday of October.

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Q.  9:  Which US state produces the most turkeys annually?

            a)  Ohio          b)  Indiana          c)  Minnesota          d)  Arkansas

A.  9:  The correct answer is  c)  Minnesota.

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Q. 10:  The name of the famous rock where the pilgrims landed?

A. 10:  Plymouth Rock.

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Q. 11:  Where was the turkey first domesticated?

A. 11:  Mexico and Central America. (A point for either answer.)

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Q. 12:  The original Thanksgiving lasted for how long?

            a)  1 day          b)  3 days          c)  5 days          d)  7 days

A. 12:  The correct answer is b)  3 days.

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Q. 13:  Which vegetable did the pilgrims have available for Thanksgiving but did not use because they thought it was poisonous?

A. 13:  Potatoes.

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Q. 14:  What American statesman lobbied to make the turkey the national symbol?

A. 14:  Benjamin Franklin.

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Q. 15:  What was the first departmental store that held a Thanksgiving parade?

A. 15:  It was Gimbel’s Department Store in Philadelphia, in 1920.

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Q. 16:  What is the name of the skin that hangs from a turkey’s neck?

A. 16:  It is called a ‘wattle’.

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Q. 17:  What do you call the day after Thanksgiving?

A. 17:  It is known as ‘Black Friday’.

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Q. 18:  The inhabitants of which state are the largest consumers of turkey in the United States?

A. 18:  Californians are the largest consumers of turkey in the United States.

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Q. 19:  How many pilgrims were on the Mayflower and how long was the voyage from England to the New World? (A point for each correct answer, and a bonus point if you get them both right.)

A. 19:  102 Pilgrims made the journey and it took them 66 days.

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Q. 20:  Which country consumes the most turkey per year per capita?

A. 20:  Israel.

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Welcome To The First Fasab Quiz For June

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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Welcome to Quiz Day.

Another month has appeared on the calendar. Unbelievably we’re almost half way through 2014 already!

But what better way to start the first week of another month than with another twenty brain-buster questions.

Business, politics, geography, history, nature, movies and music are all in here this week.

Let’s see how you do.

Enjoy and good luck.

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quiz 09

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Q.  1:  What do octopus’ and goat’s eyes have in common?

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Q.  2:  What common English word comes from the French expression meaning “death pledge”?

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Q.  3:  Adjusting for inflation, which of these two men is the richest man in history, John D Rockerfeller or Bill Gates?

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Q.  4:  What is the term for yawning and stretching at the same time?

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Q.  5:  What US President is famous for having filed a report for a UFO sighting in 1973, calling it “the darndest thing I’ve ever seen.”

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Q.  6:  In the last 4000 years, how many new animals have been domesticated?

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Q.  7:  What is the Greek version of the Old Testament called?

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Q.  8:  Soweto is a very famous location on the outskirts of Johannesburg in South Africa, but how did it get its name?

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Q.  9:  Between 1926 and 1976, John Wayne appeared in over 170 motion pictures, and became one of America’s biggest box office stars, but what was the title of his last movie?

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Q. 10:  What is the only month in recorded history not to have a full moon? (Two bonus points if you can name the year too.)

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Q. 11:  what was the only part of the United States that was invaded by the Japanese during WWII?

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Q. 12:  Why do spiral staircases in medieval castles run clockwise?

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Q. 13:  What are the only birds able to fly backwards.

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Q. 14:  If you were standing in the northernmost point in the contiguous (48) US states, what state would you be standing in?

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Q. 15:  Name the six main characters in the long running TV comedy series ‘The Beverly Hillbillies’? (A point for each and bonus points if you can name the actors who played them.)

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Q. 16:  What is the only Canadian Province that borders the Great Lakes?

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Q. 17:  Only four letters in the latin alphabet look the same if you turn them upside down or see them from behind, a point for each one you can name correctly?

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Q. 18:  Previously set in Los Angeles, Washington DC and New York, what City is the location for the latest series of the hit TV show ‘24’?

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Q. 19:  What is the only US State that begins with an “A” but does not end with an “A”?

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Q. 20:  Who shared ‘Endless Love’ with Luther Van-Dross in 1994?

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ANSWERS

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Q.  1:  What do octopus’ and goat’s eyes have in common?

A.  1:  Both have rectangular pupils.

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Q.  2:  What common English word comes from the French expression meaning “death pledge”?

A.  2:  The common English word ‘mortgage’ comes from the French expression meaning “death pledge”.

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Q.  3:  Adjusting for inflation, which of these two men is the richest man in history, John D Rockerfeller or Bill Gates?

A.  3:  When adjusted for inflation, John D Rockerfeller is the richest man in the history of the world,  with a net worth 10 times more than Bill Gates.

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Q.  4:  What is the term for yawning and stretching at the same time?

A.  4:  When you yawn and stretch at the time, you are “pandiculating.”

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Q.  5:  What US President is famous for having filed a report for a UFO sighting in 1973, calling it “the darndest thing I’ve ever seen.”

A.  5:  Jimmy Carter filed a report for a UFO sighting in 1973.

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Q.  6:  In the last 4000 years, how many new animals have been domesticated?

A.  6:  Bit of a trick question, in the last 4000 years, no new animals have been domesticated. Take a point if you answered ‘none’ or ‘zero’.

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Q.  7:  What is the Greek version of the Old Testament called?

A.  7:  The Greek version of the Old Testament is called the ‘Septuagint’.

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Q.  8:  Soweto is a very famous location on the outskirts of Johannesburg in South Africa, but how did it get its name?

A.  8:  Soweto in South Africa was derived from SOuth WEst TOwnship.

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Q.  9:  Between 1926 and 1976, John Wayne appeared in over 170 motion pictures, and became one of America’s biggest box office stars, but what was the title of his last movie?

A.  9:  John Wayne’s final movie was ‘The Shootist’, made in 1976 and in which he played the part of aging former gunslinger John Bernard Books.

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Q. 10:  What is the only month in recorded history not to have a full moon? (Two bonus points if you can name the year too.)

A. 10:  February 1865 is the only month in recorded history not to have a full moon.

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Q. 11:  what was the only part of the United States that was invaded by the Japanese during WWII?

A. 11:  Alaska was the only part of the United States that was invaded by the Japanese during WWII. The territory was the island of Adak in the Aleutian Chain. Pearl Harbor, Hawaii was attacked, but not invaded.

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Q. 12:  Why do spiral staircases in medieval castles run clockwise?

A. 12:  Spiral staircases in medieval castles run clockwise because all knights used to be right-handed and would therefore carry their swords in their right hand.

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Q. 13:  What are the only birds able to fly backwards.

A. 13:  Hummingbirds are the only birds able to fly backwards.

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Q. 14:  If you were standing in the northernmost point in the contiguous (48) US states, what state would you be standing in?

A. 14:  If you were standing in the northernmost point in the contiguous (48) US states, you’d be standing in Minnesota.

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Q. 15:  Name the six main characters in the long running TV comedy series ‘The Beverly Hillbillies’? (A point for each and bonus points if you can name the actors who played them.)

A. 15: The characters in the Beverly Hillbillies were Jed Clampett, Granny, Ellie May, Jethro, unscrupulous banker Mr Drysdale and his long-suffering assistant Miss Hathaway, played respectively by Buddy Ebsen, Irene Ryan, Donna Douglas, Max Baer, Jr., Raymond Bailey and Nancy Kulp.

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Q. 16:  What is the only Canadian Province that borders the Great Lakes?

A. 16:  Ontario is the only Canadian Province that borders the Great Lakes.

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Q. 17:  Only four letters in the latin alphabet look the same if you turn them upside down or see them from behind, a point for each one you can name correctly?

A. 17:  The only letters in the latin alphabet that look the same if you turn them upside down or see them from behind are  ‘H’  ‘I’   ‘O’  and  ‘X’.

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Q. 18:  Previously set in Los Angeles, Washington DC and New York, what City is the location for the latest series of the hit TV show ‘24’?

A. 18:  The latest series of ‘24’ is set in London, England.

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Q. 19:  What is the only US State that begins with an “A” but does not end with an “A”?

A. 19:  Arkansas is the only US State that begins with “A” but does not end with “A”, all the other States that begin with “A”, Arizona, Alabama and Alaska, also end with “A”.

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Q. 20:  Who shared ‘Endless Love’ with Luther Van-Dross in 1994?

A. 20:  Mariah Carey.

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Did You Know? – I Bet You Didn’t.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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Hello folks. Thanks for stopping by.

Here are today’s factoid offerings.

Hope you enjoy.

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did you know1

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You can’t breathe and swallow at the same time.

breathe and swallow at the same time

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There are more ways to shuffle a deck of cards

than there are atoms on Earth.

two-hands-shuffling-a-deck-of-cards-in-a-casino

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Africa is bigger than the United States, China, India, Spain, France,

and several other countries combined.

Africa

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Norway once knighted a penguin.

a penguin

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You can get a rough estimate of the temperature by

counting the number of times a cricket chirps in 13 seconds,

then adding 40.

cricket chirp and temperature

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It’s impossible to hum while holding your nose.

hum while holding your nose

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Quarantine comes from the French “qarante” for 40.

Whenever a ship arriving in port was suspected of being infected

it had to forego contact with the shore for a period of about 40 days.

Quarantine

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On average, astronauts are two inches taller in space.

astronauts-fingernails-hands-shuttle

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Ohio is the only U.S. state that doesn’t share

any letters with the word “mackerel.”

(I have no idea who figured that one out,

but they clearly had too much free time on their hands!)

mackerel

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Wombat poop is square.

(Ouch!!!)

Wombat Poo

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There is enough iron in your body to make a 2-inch nail.

a 2-inch nail

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The “S” in Harry S. Truman’s full name doesn’t stand for anything.

His parents couldn’t decide on a middle name for over a month,

so they settled on the letter “S” in honor of his maternal grandfather, Solomon Young,

and his paternal grandfather, Anderson Shipp Truman.

Harry S. Truman

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The girlfriend of the guy who founded Match.com

left him for a man she met on Match.com.

(So that’s why he did it!)

man who founded Match.com

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George Washington was 48 years old

when Beethoven was born.

George Washington

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The British music group ‘Simply Red’

is named because of its love for the football team,

Manchester United, who have a red home strip.

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Okay, so who tried to hum while holding their nose, come on?

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Twenty Quiz Questions. Go On, Have A Go!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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Hello and welcome to another start of the week quiz.

Another very random selection of questions, but don’t let that discourage you, have a go!

As usual the answers are given waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below – but please, NO cheating.

Enjoy, and good luck.

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Quiz 6

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Q.  1:  How many Dalmatians starred in the 1961 Disney movie?

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Q.  2:  Where do they make California license plates?

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Q.  3:  What is the collective term for a group of eggs, such as those found in a bird’s nest?

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Q.  4:  Which famous lady edited Michael Jackson’s 1988 autobiography “Moonwalk”?

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Q.  5:  What do they call G.I. Joe in the U.K.?

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Q.  6:  What was US President Woodrow Wilson’s first name?

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Q.  7:  In which American town or city was the TV series “Ironside” set?

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Q.  8:  What is your “niddick”? (Yes, ladies you have one too.)

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Q.  9:  In which movie, also starring Dustin Hoffman, did Sir Laurence Olivier play a Nazi war criminal named Dr. Christian Szell?

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Q. 10:  What is the name for the metal band that joins the eraser to a pencil, or the metal band at the end of a cane?

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Q. 11:  Name the only U.S. state that borders three different Canadian provinces.

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Q. 12:  Who succeeded Nasser as President of Egypt and was later assassinated?

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Q. 13:  Where did camels originate?

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Q. 14:  What famous musical was set in Austria?

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Q. 15:  What is the Scoville Heat Index and what is it used for?

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Q. 16:  Who conquered Greece in 336 at the head of a vast Macedonian Army?

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Q. 17:  Name the three lead stars in the movie “Some Like It Hot”.

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Q. 18:  What was the first country to seek diplomatic relations with the United States.

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Q. 19:  In which movies did Charlton Heston play the following roles?

    a. George Taylor,

    b. Moses,

    c. Michelangelo,

    d. General ‘Chinese’ Gordon,

    e. Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar,

    f. John the Baptist

(One point for each correct answer so your chance to earn six points here!)

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Q. 20:  What was the only father-daughter collaboration to hit number one on the Billboard pop chart? (One point each for the names of the two artists and for the name of the song.

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ANSWERS

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Q.  1:  How many Dalmatians starred in the 1961 Disney movie?

A.  1:  101

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Q.  2:  Where do they make California license plates?

A.  2:  All California license plates are made in prisons.

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Q.  3:  What is the collective term for a group of eggs, such as those found in a bird’s nest?

A.  3:  A group of eggs, such as those found in a bird’s nest, is known as a “clutch.”

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Q.  4:  Which famous lady edited Michael Jackson’s 1988 autobiography “Moonwalk”?

A.  4:  Michael Jackson’s 1988 autobiography Moonwalk was edited by Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.

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Q.  5:  What do they call G.I. Joe in the U.K.?

A.  5:  G.I. Joe is called “Action Man” in the U.K.

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Q.  6:  What was US President Woodrow Wilson’s first name?

A.  6:  Woodrow Wilson’s first name was Thomas. Woodrow was actually his middle name.

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Q.  7:  In which American town or city was the TV series “Ironside” set?

A.  7:  San Francisco

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Q.  8:  What is your “niddick”? (Yes, ladies you have one too.)

A.  8:  “Niddick” is another name for the nape of your neck.

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Q.  9:  In which movie, also starring Dustin Hoffman, did Sir Laurence Olivier play a Nazi war criminal named Dr. Christian Szell?

A.  9:  Marathon Man.

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Q. 10:  What is the name for the metal band that joins the eraser to a pencil, or the metal band at the end of a cane?

A. 10:  The metal band that joins the eraser to a pencil and the metal band at the end of a cane is a called a “ferrule.”

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Q. 11:  Name the only U.S. state that borders three different Canadian provinces.

A. 11:  Montana is the only U.S. state that borders three different Canadian provinces (Alberta, British Columbia, and Saskatchewan).

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Q. 12:  Who succeeded Nasser as President of Egypt and was later assassinated?

A. 12:  Anwar Sadat.

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Q. 13:  Where did camels originate?

A. 13:  Camels actually originated in North America.

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Q. 14:  What famous musical was set in Austria?

A. 14:  The Sound Of Music.

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Q. 15:  What is the Scoville Heat Index and what is it used for?

A. 15:  The Scoville Heat Index is a scale for measuring the spiciness of food. The spiciest pepper has over 1,000,000 Scoville units.

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Q. 16:  Who conquered Greece in 336 at the head of a vast Macedonian Army?

A. 16:  Alexander The Great.

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Q. 17:  Name the three lead stars in the movie “Some Like It Hot”.

A. 17:  Jack Lemmon, Tony Curtis and Marilyn Monroe.

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Q. 18:  What was the first country to seek diplomatic relations with the United States.

A. 18:  In 1777, Morocco became the first country to seek diplomatic relations with the United States.

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Q. 19:  In which movies did Charlton Heston play the following roles?

    a. George Taylor,

    b. Moses,

    c. Michelangelo,

    d. General ‘Chinese’ Gordon,

    e. Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar,

    f. John the Baptist

(One point for each correct answer so your chance to earn six points here!)

A. 19:  Charlton Heston played

    a. George Taylor in “Planet of the Apes (Beneath the Planet of the Apes)”

    b. Moses in “The Ten Commandments”

    c. Michelangelo in “The Agony and the Ecstasy”

    d. General ‘Chinese’ Gordon in “Khartoum”

    e. Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar in “El Cid”

    f. John the Baptist in “The Greatest Story Ever Told”

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Q. 20:  What was the only father-daughter collaboration to hit number one on the Billboard pop chart? (One point each for the names of the two artists and for the name of the song.)

A. 20:  The only father-daughter collaboration to hit number one on the Billboard pop chart was “Something Stupid” by Frank & Nancy Sinatra in 1967.

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Time To Put The Little Grey Cells To Work. It’s Quiz Day!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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Another quiz for you today. Some easy ones but a few of them this time are quite difficult I think, but we’ll see what you make of them.

As usual the answers are waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below  –  but NO cheating please!

The best of luck and enjoy.

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quiz 05

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Q.  1:  What is Michael J. Fox’s middle name?

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Q.  2:  2013 is the first year this millennium this has happened, when was the previous time?

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Q.  3:  Only one U.S. state’s name ends with the letter “K.” Likewise, only one U.S. state’s name ends with the letter “G”. Name them. (A point for each correct answer.)

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Q.  4:  What was the “parental guidance” movie rating known as before it became “PG”?

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Q.  5:  I’m sure that at one time or another you have suffered from “sphenopalatine ganglioneuralgia”, but what is it more commonly known as?

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Q.  6:  For many years the Anglo-European Concorde super sonic passenger jet flew between London and New York. But what was the only internal route used by this airplane within the United States?

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Q.  7:  What is the small “You Are Here” sticker that indicates your position on a map called?

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Q.  8:  If your doctor says he is going to perform an “auscultation” on you what procedure would he or she be carrying out?

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Q.  9:  Though it’s not as well-known as the Grand Canyon what is name of the deepest gorge in the U.S. at nearly 8,000 feet?

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Q. 10:  What country has the most wild camels?

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Q. 11:  Who is the youngest man to become President of the USA and who is the youngest man to be elected President of the USA? (A point for each correct answer.)

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Q. 12:  Drug lord Pablo Escobar’s Medellin Cartel spent $2,500 a month on rubber bands. Why?  

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Q. 13:  Two of America’s greatest national symbols are The Liberty Bell and the Statue of Liberty. Where were they made? (A point for each correct answer.)

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Q. 14:  Which British liner was sunk off the Irish coast by a German submarine on 7th May 1915?

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Q. 15:  Which actress starred in the controversial movie ‘Rosemary’s Baby’?

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Q. 16:  The first armored presidential limo was used by President Franklin Roosevelt just as the United States was entering WW II. Who was its former owner?

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Q. 17:  In what American town or city was the TV series “Married With Children” set?

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Q. 18:  Nurse, Cookie Cutter, Blue, Zebra, Carpet, School, Bull and Wobbegong are all examples of what?

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Q. 19:  What is the name given to the Japanese crime organization?

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Q. 20:  Which American film director had the middle name Blount?

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ANSWERS

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Q.  1:  What is Michael J. Fox’s middle name?

A.  1:  Michael J. Fox’s middle name is Andrew.

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Q.  2:  2013 is the first year this millennium this has happened, when was the previous time?

A.  2:  1987 (Years where all four digits are different from one another.)

Q.  3:  Only one U.S. state’s name ends with the letter “K.” Likewise, only one U.S. state’s name ends with the letter “G”. Name them. (A point for each correct aswer.)

A.  3:  The U.S. state’s name ending with the letter “K” is New York. The U.S. state’s name ending with the letter “G” is Wyoming.

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Q.  4:  What was the “parental guidance” movie rating known as before it became “PG”?

A.  4:  It was known as “GP” (for General audience, Parental guidance suggested).

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Q.  5:  I’m sure that at one time or another you have suffered from “sphenopalatine ganglioneuralgia”, but what is it more commonly known as?

A.  5:  Sphenopalatine ganglioneuralgia is the medical term for ice cream headaches.

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Q.  6:  For many years the Anglo-European Concorde super sonic passenger jet flew between London and New York. But what was the only internal route used by this airplane within the United States?

A.  6:  The only inter-U.S. flights made by the Concorde were between New York’s JFK Airport and the oil-rich Texas metropolis of Dallas-Fort Worth.

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Q.  7:  What is the small “You Are Here” sticker that indicates your position on a map called?

A.  7:  It is called an ideo locator.

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Q.  8:  If your doctor says he is going to perform an “auscultation” on you what procedure would he or she be carrying out?

A.  8:  When a doctor performs an auscultation on you he or she will just be using his stethoscope.

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Q.  9:  Though it’s not as well-known as the Grand Canyon what is name of the deepest gorge in the U.S. at nearly 8,000 feet?

A.  9:  The deepest gorge in the U.S. at nearly 8,000 feet is called  Hell’s Canyon

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Q. 10:  What country has the most wild camels?

A. 10:  Australia.

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Q. 11:  Who is the youngest man to become President of the USA and who is the youngest man to be elected President of the USA? (A point for each correct answer.)

A. 11:  Teddy Roosevelt is the youngest man to become President (age 42) while John F Kennedy is the youngest man to be elected President (age 43).

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Q. 12:  Drug lord Pablo Escobar’s Medellin Cartel spent $2,500 a month on rubber bands. Why?  

A. 12:  To hold all their bundles of cash.

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Q. 13:  Two of America’s greatest national symbols are The Liberty Bell and the Statue of Liberty. Where were they made? (A point for each correct answer.)

A. 13:  The Liberty Bell was cast in England and the Statue of Liberty was crafted in France.

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Q. 14:  Which British liner was sunk off the Irish coast by a German submarine on 7th May 1915?

A. 14:  The Lusitania.   

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Q. 15:  Which actress starred in the controversial movie ‘Rosemary’s Baby’?

A. 15:  Mia Farrow.

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Q. 16:  The first armored presidential limo was used by President Franklin Roosevelt just as the United States was entering WW II. Who was its former owner?

A. 16:  This particular Cadillac convertible originally belonged to the gangster Al Capone. It was seized in 1932 when Capone was charged with tax evasion.

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Q. 17:  In which American town or city was the TV series “Married With Children” set?

A. 17:  Chicago.

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Q. 18:  Nurse, Cookie Cutter, Blue, Zebra, Carpet, School, Bull and Wobbegong are all examples of what?

A. 18:  Sharks.

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Q. 19:  What is the name given to the Japanese crime organization?

A. 19:  The Yakuza.

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Q. 20:  Which American film director had the middle name Blount?

A. 20:  Cecil B de Mille.

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