Handcuffs Explains A Lot – More Fasab Facts!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

You’ll understand the title of this post better in a moment when you read the latest collection of facts from the fasab archives.

A little bit of something for everyone I hope.

Enjoy.

.

did you know2

.

In Spanish the word

“esposas”

means both

“wives” and “handcuffs”.

That explains a lot.

handcuffs

.

.

NASA was sued by three men from Yemen

for trespassing on Mars.

They claimed that they had inherited

the planet from their ancestors

thousands of years ago.

trespassing on Mars

.

.

The Incas introduced the world to potatoes

via the Spanish conquistadors and

nearly a quarter of Europe’s growth

between the 1700s and the 1900s has been

attributed to the introduction of this crop.

potatoes

.

.

According to scientists, about three quarters

of the species that make Australia home

have yet to be discovered.

wildlife in Australia

.

.

When an unemployed painter named

Richard Lawrence tried to shoot Andrew Jackson,

his gun wouldn’t fire.

The 67 year old president began to

beat his would-be assassin with a cane

during which the assassin pulled out another gun.

This gun also misfired and the

disgruntled painter was dragged away.

Richard Lawrence tried to shoot Andrew Jackson

.

.

There is actually high speed internet access

all the way up Mount Everest.

Everest

.

.

In 2000, Congress passed the

National Moment of Remembrance Act

which requires all Americans to stop

what they are doing at 3pm on Memorial Day

to remember and honor those who have died

serving the United States.

National Moment of Remembrance Act

.

.

At the start of World War I

the US Air Force only had 18 pilots.

A pilot checks his bomb placement after dropping a "flour bomb" during a target competition Sept. 22 at the Dawn Patrol Rendezvous World War I Fly-In on the grounds of the National Museum of the United States Air Force in Dayton, Ohio. Activities included period re-enactors in a war encampment setting, era automobiles on display and participating in a parade, flying exhibitions by WWI radio-controlled aircraft, and a collector's show for WWI items.  (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt Joshua Strang)

.

.

Rogue planets, also known as interstellar planets,

nomad planets or orphan planets, are

planetary-mass objects that have

broken from their orbits and

travel aimlessly through space.

The closest rogue planet to Earth yet discovered

is around 7 light years away.

Rogue planets

.

.

You can get ice cream in lobster,

squid Ink, and caviar flavors.

lobster ice cream

.

.

At 1,435 meters per second

the speed of sound in water is almost

five times faster than it is in air.

speed of sound in water

.

.

Keith Richards of The Rolling Stones

attributed his popular song

(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction

to a dream.

He’s said to have recorded the acoustic riffs

just before falling back to sleep.

(The riffs were followed by 40 minutes of him snoring.)

.

.

================================

.

 

 

The Quizzes March On!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

The quizzes do March on and we are starting this month with a good mix of questions. Some you should get without too much difficulty and some you will have to think about for a while.

Oh yes, and one that I will be surprised if anyone gets the bonus points for. You’ll know it when you see it.

As usual if you do get stuck, you can find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating.

Enjoy and good luck.

.

quiz 05

.

Q.  1:  ‘Solidarity’ was an important Trade Union in which country in the 1980s?

.

.

Q.  2:  In lawn bowls (and its indoor version), what is the target ball called?

.

.

Q.  3:  Which creature lives on mulberry leaves?

.

.

Q.  4:  In the USA what cities are known as the

 a) Big D?    b) Steel City?    c) City of Brotherly Love?    d) Emerald City?

(A point for each correct answer and a bonus point if get all four correct.)

.

.

Q.  5:  In relation to power what is the equivalent of 746 watts?

.

.

Q.  6:  What word denoted the new policy of openness adopted by Mikhail Gorbachev’s government in the Soviet Union?

.

.

Q.  7:  What well known pottery form takes its name from the Italian for “baked earth”?

.

.

Q.  8:  How long did Rip Van Winkle sleep for?

.

.

Q.  9:  What term is given to a piece of rock or metal from space that reaches the surface of the Earth?

.

.

Q. 10:  The suffix ‘stan’ is Persian for ‘place of’ or ‘country’. The names of seven countries end in ‘stan’, what are they? (You get a point for each one you can name correctly and five (yes, 5) bonus points if get them all correct.) 

a) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ stan  

b)  _ _ _ _ _ _ stan       

c) _ _ _ _ _ _ stan    

d) _ _ _ _ stan      

e) _ _ _ _ _ _ stan      

f) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ stan    

g) _ _ _ _ _ _ stan

.

.

Q. 11:  What color is the most-prized variety of jade?

.

.

Q. 12:  Whose theorem uses a 3, 4, 5 triangle?

.

.

Q. 13:  Piraeus serves as the port for which major city?

.

.

Q. 14:  Which insects communicate with one another by dancing?

.

.

Q. 15:  What was the name of Captain Nemo’s submarine?

.

.

Q. 16:  What creature is an ophidiophobe afraid of?

.

.

Q. 17:  In the US and the UK what is the name given to the government department responsible for formulating and recommending economic, financial, tax, and fiscal policies?

.

.

Q. 18:  Which of the 12 Zodiac signs start with the letter ‘L’ ?

.

.

Q. 19:  Which English politician, when told by Lady Nancy Astor that if he were her husband she’d put poison in his coffee, replied that if she were his wife he’d drink it?

.

.

Q. 20:  What popular song originated as the jingle “Buy the World a Coke” in the groundbreaking 1971 “Hilltop” television commercial for Coca-Cola? (A bonus point is available if you can also correctly name the group.)

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

ANSWERS

.

Q.  1:  ‘Solidarity’ was an important Trade Union in which country in the 1980s?

A.  1:  Poland.

.

.

Q.  2:  In lawn bowls (and its indoor version), what is the target ball called?

A.  2:  Jack.

.

.

Q.  3:  Which creature lives on mulberry leaves?

A.  3:  The Silk worm.

.

.

Q.  4:  In the USA what cities are known as the

    a) Big D?      b) Steel City?      c) City of Brotherly Love?      d) Emerald City?

(A point for each correct answer and a bonus point if get all four correct.)

A.  4:  The correct answers are   

a) The Big D = Dallas     

b) The Steel City = Pittsburgh       

c) The City of Brotherly Love = Philadelphia            

d) The Emerald City = Seattle

.

.

Q.  5:  In relation to power what is the equivalent of 746 watts?

A.  5:  746 watts is the equivalent of 1 horse power.

.

.

Q.  6:  What word denoted the new policy of openness adopted by Mikhail Gorbachev’s government in the Soviet Union?

A.  6:  Glasnost.

.

.

Q.  7:  What well known pottery form takes its name from the Italian for “baked earth”?

A.  7:  Terracotta.

.

.

Q.  8:  How long did Rip Van Winkle sleep for?

A.  8:  Twenty years.

.

.

Q.  9:  What term is given to a piece of rock or metal from space that reaches the surface of the Earth?

A.  9:  It is known as a ‘Meteorite’.

.

.

Q. 10:  The suffix ‘stan’ is Persian for ‘place of’ or ‘country’. The names of seven countries end in ‘stan’, what are they? (You get a point for each one you can name correctly and seven (yes, 7) bonus points if get them all correct.) 

a) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ stan   

b)  _ _ _ _ _ _ stan        

c) _ _ _ _ _ _ stan  

d) _ _ _ _ stan      

e) _ _ _ _ _ _ stan      

f) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ stan    

g) _ _ _ _ _ _ stan

A. 10:  They are in alphabetical order, 

a)  Afghanistan    

b)  Kazakhstan    

c)  Kyrgyzstan   

d)  Pakistan    

e)  Tajikistan   

 f)  Turkmenistan    

g)  Uzbekistan

.

.

Q. 11:  What color is the most-prized variety of jade?

A. 11:  Green.

.

.

Q. 12:  Whose theorem uses a 3, 4, 5 triangle?

A. 12:  Pythagoras.

.

.

Q. 13:  Piraeus serves as the port for which major city?

A. 13:  Athens.

.

.

Q. 14:  Which insects communicate with one another by dancing?

A. 14:  Bees.

.

.

Q. 15:  What was the name of Captain Nemo’s submarine?

A. 15:  It was called the ‘Nautilus’.

.

.

Q. 16:  What creature is an ophidiophobe afraid of?

A. 16:  Snakes.

.

.

Q. 17:  In the US and the UK what is the name given to the government department responsible for formulating and recommending economic, financial, tax, and fiscal policies?

A. 17:  Treasury.

.

.

Q. 18:  Which of the 12 Zodiac signs start with the letter ‘L’ ?

A. 18:  They are Leo and Libra.

.

.

Q. 19:  Which English politician, when told by Lady Nancy Astor that if he were her husband she’d put poison in his coffee, replied that if she were his wife he’d drink it?

A. 19:  Winston Churchill.

.

.

Q. 20:  What popular song originated as the jingle “Buy the World a Coke” in the groundbreaking 1971 “Hilltop” television commercial for Coca-Cola? (A bonus point is available if you can also correctly name the group.)

A. 20:  “I’d Like To Teach The World To Sing (In Perfect Harmony) by The New Seekers.

.

.

.

=====================================

.

Another Week, Another Quiz!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Hi, and welcome to another week and to start it off, another quiz.

The usual selection of random questions to test your knowledge.

And, as usual, if you get stuck you can find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please, NO cheating!

Enjoy and good luck.

.

Quiz_button 02

.

Q.  1:  This one is the name of a famous city and also the man who ran away with Helen?

.

.

Q.  2:  What is the highest mountain in Africa?

.

.

Q.  3:  On which river does the city of Vienna stand?

.

.

Q.  4:  Who was the Empress of India in 1876?

.

.

Q.  5:  In which South American country did the ‘bossa nova’ originate?

.

.

Q.  6:  The so-called “Pastry war” of 1838 was fought between which two nations?

.

.

Q.  7:  Which capital city features in the name of a movie starring Sabu and based on the Arabian Nights?

.

.

Q.  8:  What started in a bakery in Pudding Lane in 1666?

.

.

Q.  9:  To which country does the island of Madeira belong?

.

.

Q. 10:  It’s almost time for the Hollywood Academy Awards again, but who won the Academy Award for best actress two years in a row in 1967 and 1968? (Bonus points if you can also name the movies.)

.

.

Q. 11:  How old was Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart when he died in 1791?

.

.

Q. 12:  What U.S. President committed an unpardonable sin by kissing Britain’s Queen Mother on the lips?

.

.

Q. 13:  On which small island did the USA first test their H bomb in 1954?

.

.

Q. 14:  Most people have heard of the phrase “Crossing the Rubicon” meaning to pass a point of no return, but who was the source of the phrase when he crossed the Rubicon and who was his opponent? (A point for each.)

.

.

Q. 15:  What make of car did Lenin and Stalin have one of that Brezhnev had three of?

.

.

Q. 16:  Which country seceded from Colombia in 1903?

.

.

Q. 17:  Which famous movie title is the Mexican name for the river known in the USA as ‘Rio Grande’?

.

.

Q. 18:  in 1984 who were Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd and Harold Ramis?

.

.

Q. 19:  What mythological creature did Britain’s King George V have tattooed on his right arm?

.

.

Q. 20:  Versions of this popular song have been recorded by Julie Covington, Madonna, Sarah Brighman, Elaine Paige, Sinead O’Connor, Susan Erens and The Carpenters, among others, what is it?

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

ANSWERS

.

Q.  1:  This one is the name of a famous city and also the man who ran away with Helen?

A.  1:  Paris.

.

.

Q.  2:  What is the highest mountain in Africa?

A.  2:  Mt. Kilimanjaro.

.

.

Q.  3:  On which river does the city of Vienna stand?

A.  3:  The River Danube.

.

.

Q.  4:  Who was the Empress of India in 1876?

A.  4:  Britain’s Queen Victoria.

.

.

Q.  5:  In which South American country did the ‘bossa nova’ originate?

A.  5:  Brazil.

.

.

Q.  6:  The so-called “Pastry war” of 1838 was fought between which two nations?

A.  6:  Mexico and France.

.

.

Q.  7:  Which capital city features in the name of a movie starring Sabu and based on the Arabian Nights?

A.  7:  Baghdad, the name of the movie is “The Thief of Baghdad”.

.

.

Q.  8:  What started in a bakery in Pudding Lane in 1666?

A.  8:  The great fire of London.

.

.

Q.  9:  To which country does the island of Madeira belong?

A.  9:  Portugal.

.

.

Q. 10:  It’s almost time for the Hollywood Academy Awards again, but who won the Academy Award for best actress two years in a row in 1967 and 1968? (Bonus points if you can also name the movies.)

A. 10:  Katharine Hepburn, in 1967 for ‘Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner’ and in 1968 for ‘The Lion In Winter’.

.

.

Q. 11:  How old was Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart when he died in 1791?

A. 11:  Only 35 years old.

.

.

Q. 12:  What U.S. President committed an unpardonable sin by kissing Britain’s Queen Mother on the lips?

A. 12:  President Jimmy Carter.

.

.

Q. 13:  On which small island did the USA first test their H bomb in 1954?

A. 13:  Bikini.

.

.

Q. 14:  Most people have heard of the phrase “Crossing the Rubicon” meaning to pass a point of no return, but who was the source of the phrase when he crossed the Rubicon and who was his opponent? (A point for each.)

A. 14:  The phrase originated when Julius Caesar crossed the River Rubicon to fight Pompey.

.

.

Q. 15:  What make of car did Lenin and Stalin have one of that Brezhnev had three of?

A. 15:  Rolls Royce.

.

.

Q. 16:  Which country seceded from Colombia in 1903?

A. 16:  Panama.

.

.

Q. 17:  Which famous movie title is the Mexican name for the river known in the USA as ‘Rio Grande’?

A. 17: Rio Bravo

.

.

Q. 18:  in 1984 who were Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd and Harold Ramis?

A. 18:  They were the ‘Ghostbusters’, a group of misfit parapsychologists Peter Venkman (Bill Murray), Raymond Stantz (Dan Aykroyd), and Egon Spengler (Harold Ramis).

.

.

Q. 19:  What mythological creature did Britain’s King George V have tattooed on his right arm?

A. 19:  A Dragon.

.

.

Q. 20:  Versions of this popular song have been recorded by Julie Covington, Madonna, Sarah Brighman, Elaine Paige, Sinead O’Connor, Susan Erens and The Carpenters, among others, what is it?

A. 20:  “Don’t Cry For Me, Argentina”

.

.

===============================================

.