Forget The Cold War, The Summer Is Here

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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2nd cold war

The world breathed a great sigh of relief when the Soviet Union broke apart in 1991, but somehow we’re in the middle of another cold war that nobody wants or needs.

How did that happen?

As most things do, it all started with a huge mistake. That mistake was the West, particularly America, treating Russia like a defeated country after 1991, instead of the formidable nation that it still was despite the breakup of the USSR. Mikhail Gorbachev has acknowledged that fact.

Unfortunately Americans have no clue about foreign affairs and never have had. That, plus a ton of arrogance, led us to the Ukraine which America thought it could more or less capture as an ally to be slotted into NATO. They wanted a fully armed NATO nuclear arsenal on the Russian’s doorstep.

The Americans quite rightly didn’t like it when the Russians tried to do it to them in Cuba way back in the early 1960s, so what idiot thought that the Russians would like it when they did it to them?

Zbigniew Brzezinski

Whoever formulated the plan, it was heavily influenced by Zbigniew Brzezinski, former US National Security Advisor during President Carter’s administration. His theory was that the only way to prevent Russia becoming a great power again was to remove the Ukraine from its sphere of influence.

Thus America initiated an eastward expansion of NATO, using the EU to present the Ukraine with a choice between Russia and Europe. Some Ukrainians, like those in the Crimea favored Russia and others in other parts wanted closer ties with the EU.

Like many other countries, the prospect of joining the EU is attractive to a significant proportion of Ukrainians. But the way America tried to bring it about was just a step too far. The Ukrainian President, who had been duly elected, was removed in what would have been called a “coup d’etat” had it happened elsewhere, or had Russia been the culprit.

That is why a lot of the tensions between the West and Russia is centered on the internal troubles within the Ukraine.

If one looks into the history of the Ukraine another significant part of the puzzle presents itself.

ukraine-map

In much the same way as stupid English bureaucrats redrew borders in the Middle East without any consideration for the people who lived there, (for example, the Kurds), which resulted in wars and upheaval ever since, when the Soviet Union broke apart somewhere in the region of 25 million Russians were left outside the borders of Russia. A lot of them were in the Crimea in the Ukraine.

But the Ukraine had only been independent for three years in its history (1917-20), after the collapse of the tsarist armies.

The post-December 1991 Ukraine was thus a composite entity, its western regions had belonged to Poland between WWI and WWII; its eastern regions were Orthodox and Russian-speaking; and its Black Sea coast had been Ottoman.

The Crimea had never been Ukrainian until Nikita Khrushchev decreed it should be in 1954.

Thus, for anyone with any degree of understanding of foreign affairs, the troubles now being suffered by the various peoples in the Ukraine were both predictable and avoidable.

But the stupid bureaucrats in power were not able to predict it and thus the mess became inevitable.

Ukraine crisis

Sadly the situation has now deteriorated into what amounts to a civil war in the Ukraine. On one side there is the Ukrainian army plus “volunteer battalions”, supported by the US and its allies, and on the other the “separatist” militias who draw their support mainly from Russian-speakers in the east, and who are supported by Russia.

Outside of what is happening in the Ukraine itself, the US and EU implemented severe sanctions against Russia which have hurt, but not nearly as much as they were supposed to. In turn Russia announced counter-sanctions on food and looked to emerging markets, particularly China, to diversify its foreign trade and industrial cooperation.

And so the Cold War part two has begun and shows little sign of ending just yet.

In fact it looks like the Ukraine will remain in a mess until it gets its act together and decides whether it wants to remain on friendly economic terms with its huge neighbor Russia, or whether it will settle for becoming subservient to the whims of the US, via some kind of economic agreement with the EU.

It has a third option, though, perhaps its best option, and that is not taking sides, but rather remaining on friendly terms with both East and West.

However, they may never get the chance to choose option three. In plain language, I don’t think that the people who arrange assassinations and coup d’etats will let them do that.

Meantime, summer or not, the chill continues.

snow in summer sun

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If It’s Monday It Must Be Quiz Day!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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Another chance to pit your wits against the fasab quiz archives with another random set of twenty questions.

Although there are one or two very easy ones, I think quite a lot of them are difficult this time, but here’s your chance to prove me wrong.

As always the answers are waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below – but NO cheating.

Enjoy and good luck!

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quiz 10

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Q.  1: What does the http:// in web URLs stand for?

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Q.  2:  What is the hood ornament on a Rolls Royce called?

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Q.  3:  Which former president of the United States, in his college days, worked as a male model, and even appeared on the cover of Cosmopolitan?

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Q.  4:  In what country would you find the strangely named lakes “Titicaca” and “Poopo”?

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Q.  5:  Sleeping through the winter is called “hibernation,” but what is the word that describes sleeping through hot and dry periods like summer?

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Q.  6:  Members of the band “ZZ Top” are famous for their beards, but what was the surname of the only member who hadn’t got one?

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Q.  7:  In 1918 the so-called “Spanish Flu” spread around the world killing tens of millions of people, but where did the outbreak start?

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Q.  8:  Who was the only U.S. president never to sign a bill into law?

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Q.  9:  On which continent are the 50 tallest mountains on Earth are all located? (This is easy if you think about it)

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Q. 10:  Which world famous company’s name means “three oceans” in Japanese because the company’s founder wanted to sell his wares across the Indian, Atlantic, and Pacific oceans?

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Q. 11:  How old was Albert Einstein, a genius if ever there was one, when he learned how to drive?

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Q. 12:  What was the first ever registered domain name?

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Q. 13:  What city is America’s skyscraper capital?

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Q. 14:  Earlier this month the United States celebrated its birthday, but what is the only other country in the world to celebrate its birthday on July 4th?

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Q. 15:  Who is O’Hare International Airport in Chicago, Illinois named after?

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Q. 16:  The citizens of which country eat more donuts per capita than any other?

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Q. 17:  What European country is the world’s leading exporter of false teeth?

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Q. 18:  At more than 3.3 million square miles, what is the name of the world’s largest hot desert?

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Q. 19:  We have all seen a Snellen Chart, but what is it?

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Q. 20:  Possibly some of you have said “!#@%” when faced with a difficult question in this test, but what is the name for symbols such as “!#@%” that are used to indicate swearing in comic strips?

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ANSWERS

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Q.  1: What does the http:// in web URLs stand for?

A.  1:  The http:// in web URLs stands for “Hyper Text Transfer Protocol.”

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Q.  2:  What is the hood ornament on a Rolls Royce called?

A.  2:  The Spirit of Ecstasy.

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Q.  3:  Which former president of the United States in his college days, worked as a male model, and even appeared on the cover of Cosmopolitan?

A.  3:  Former president Gerald Ford wasn’t always gray-haired and paunchy — in his college days, he worked as a male model, and even appeared on the cover of Cosmopolitan.

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Q.  4:  In what country would you find the strangely named lakes “Titicaca” and “Poopo”?

A.  4:  In Bolivia, South America.

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Q.  5:  Sleeping through the winter is called “hibernation,” but what is the word that describes sleeping through hot and dry periods like summer?

A.  5:  Sleeping through hot and dry periods like summer is called “estivation.”

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Q.  6:  Members of the band “ZZ Top” are famous for their beards, but what was the surname of the only member who hadn’t got one?

A.  6:  Ironically, the only member of ZZ Top without a beard has the last name Beard.

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Q.  7:  In 1918 the so-called “Spanish Flu” spread around the world killing tens of millions of people, but where did the outbreak start?

A.  7:  The so-called “Spanish Flu” of 1918 started at a military camp in Kansas before spreading around the world and killing millions.

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Q.  8:  Who was the only U.S. president never to sign a bill into law?

A.  8:  William Henry Harrison was the only U.S. president never to sign a bill into law — he died before having the opportunity.

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Q.  9:  On which continent are the 50 tallest mountains on Earth are all located? (This is easy if you think about it)

A.  9:  Mount Everest, the tallest mountain on Earth is located in the Himalayas in Asia so since it has to be one of the 50 tallest mountains on Earth, they all have to be located in Asia.

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Q. 10:  Which world famous company’s name means “three oceans” in Japanese because the company’s founder wanted to sell his wares across the Indian, Atlantic, and Pacific oceans?

A. 10:  Sanyo means “three oceans” in Japanese.

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Q. 11:  How old was Albert Einstein, a genius if ever there was one, when he learned how to drive?

A. 11:  Albert Einstein never learned how to drive.

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Q. 12:  What was the first ever registered domain name?

A. 12:  The first registered domain name was symbolics.com. It was registered on March 15th, 1985.

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Q. 13:  What city is America’s skyscraper capital?

A. 13:  Chicago is America’s skyscraper capital. The city has more 1,000-foot tall buildings than any other U.S. city.

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Q. 14:  Earlier this month the United States celebrated its birthday, but what is the only other country in the world to celebrate its birthday on July 4th?

A. 14:  The only other country in the world to celebrate the United States’ birthday, July 4th, is Denmark.

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Q. 15:  Who is O’Hare International Airport in Chicago, Illinois named after?

A. 15:  O’Hare International Airport in Chicago, Illinois is named after Al Capone’s lawyer’s son, Lt. Cmdr. Butch O’Hare.

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Q. 16:  The citizens of which country eat more donuts per capita than any other?

A. 16:  Canadians eat more donuts per capita than any other country.

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Q. 17:  What European country is the world’s leading exporter of false teeth?

A. 17:  Liechtenstein is the world’s leading exporter of false teeth.

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Q. 18:  At more than 3.3 million square miles, what is the name of the world’s largest hot desert?

A. 18:  At more than 3.3 million square miles, the Sahara Desert is as large as the world’s next 20 largest hot deserts combined.

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Q. 19:  We have all seen a Snellen Chart, but what is it?

A. 19:  The eye test chart with the big ‘E’ on top is known as the Snellen Chart.

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Q. 20:  Possibly some of you have said “!#@%” when faced with a difficult question in this test, but what is the name for symbols such as “!#@%” that are used to indicate swearing in comic strips?

A. 20:  Symbols such as “!#@%” that are used to indicate swearing in comic strips are called grawlix.

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How Smart Do You Feel Today?

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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So how smart do you feel today?

Smart enough to try your hand at today’s quiz?

I hope so. And remember if you get stuck the answers can be found waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below – but NO cheating!

Begin any time you are ready – and enjoy.

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quiz 09

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Q.  1:  What superseded the autogiro (or autogyro) in the late 1940s?

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Q.  2:  What kind of leaves were often used as currency in 18th century Siberia?

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Q.  3:  In the USA, what is (you can have a point for each correct answer)

  a. the nickname for the president’s limo

  b. the nickname for the brief case with the nuclear codes

  c. the name of the helicopter that transports the US President

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Q.  4:  What kind of star is our sun?  (2 words)

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Q.  5:  Which Pink Floyd album is also a chapter in ‘The Wind in the Willows’?

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Q.  6:  Which national dance can apparently cure a spider’s bite?

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Q.  7:  In Paris, where would you find Franklin D Roosevelt, Victor Hugo and George V?

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Q.  8:  What do many men collect in an ‘omphalo’?

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Q.  9:  The original ‘two bits’ (quarter coin) looked like a cake or pie shaped wedge and was one quarter of what?

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Q. 10:  General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna (of Alamo fame) had two funerals. The first one took place while he was President of Mexico and he himself was a mourner. What was put to rest in this pompous ‘funeral’?

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Q. 11:  After the investigation, why was all the Challenger Space Shuttle wreckage buried under 50 tons of concrete?

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Q. 12:  On a ship, what is a ‘dead head’?

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Q. 13:  A Scottish woman was nominated six times for the Oscar for best actress and came away empty handed each time. A record. Who was she?

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Q. 14:  The name for which vehicle probably stems from a World War I phrase for a dirty weekend in Paris?

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Q. 15:  Which TV family lived at 1313 Mockingbird Lane?

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Q. 16:  Which suave and sophisticated actor played the role of Beau Maverick, Bret Maverick’s English cousin in the US television series Maverick?

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Q. 17:  Paris attracts the most visitors in France each year. Which French town attracts 5 million visitors a year and has more hotels than any other French city except Paris?

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Q. 18:  Which large vehicle is also a name for Krishna meaning ‘Lord of the Universe’?

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Q. 19:  Why did many radio stations around the world observe two minutes of silence in late July, 1937?

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Q. 20:  Citizens of which country coined the term ‘Molotov Cocktail’ or ‘Molotov Bread Basket’ to describe their incendiary weapon used against the Soviets in 1939?

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ANSWERS

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Q.  1:  What superseded the autogiro (or autogyro) in the late 1940s?

A.  1:  The Helicopter

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Q.  2:  What kind of leaves were often used as currency in 18th century Siberia?

A.  2:  Tea leaves

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Q.  3:  In the USA, what is

  a. the nickname for the president’s limo

  b. the nickname for the brief case with the nuclear codes

  c. the name of the helicopter that transports the US President

A.  3:  Three Answers

    a. “The Beast”

    b. “The Football”

    c.  “Marine One”

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Q.  4:  What kind of star is our sun?  (2 words)

A.  4:  Yellow dwarf

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Q.  5:  Which Pink Floyd album is also a chapter in ‘The Wind in the Willows’?

A.  5:  The Piper at the Gates of Dawn

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Q.  6:  Which national dance can apparently cure a spider’s bite?

A.  6:  The Tarantella

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Q.  7:  In Paris, where would you find Franklin D Roosevelt, Victor Hugo and George V?

A.  7:  In the Paris Metro. They are all Metro stations.

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Q.  8:  What do many men collect in an omphalo?

A.  8:  Fluff (The omphalo is the belly button)

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Q.  9:  The original ‘two bits’ (quarter coin) looked like a cake or pie shaped wedge and was one quarter of what?

A.  9:  The Spanish silver dollar, the dollars were called pesos de ocho (pieces of eight).

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Q. 10:  General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna (of Alamo fame) had two funerals. The first one took place while he was President of Mexico and he himself was a mourner. What was put to rest in this pompous ‘funeral’?

A. 10:  His amputated leg.

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Q. 11:  After the investigation, why was all the Challenger Space Shuttle wreckage buried under 50 tons of concrete?

A. 11:  To prevent the parts being sold as souvenirs.

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Q. 12:  On a ship, what is a ‘dead head’?

A. 12:  Some people think it’s a broken toilet but actually it is a non paying passenger.

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Q. 13:  A Scottish woman was nominated six times for the Oscar for best actress and came away empty handed each time. A record. Who was she?

A. 13:  Deborah Kerr

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Q. 14:  The name for which vehicle probably stems from a World War I phrase for a dirty weekend in Paris?

A. 14:  Chitty Chitty Bang Bang

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Q. 15:  Which TV family lived at 1313 Mockingbird Lane?

A. 15:  The Munsters

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Q. 16:  Which suave and sophisticated actor played the role of Beau Maverick, Bret Maverick’s English cousin in the US television series Maverick?

A. 16:  Roger Moore

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Q. 17:  Paris attracts the most visitors in France each year. Which French town attracts 5 million visitors a year and has more hotels than any other French city except Paris?

A. 17:  Lourdes

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Q. 18:  Which large vehicle is also a name for Krishna meaning ‘Lord of the Universe’?

A. 18:  Juggernaut

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Q. 19:  Why did many radio stations around the world observe two minutes of silence in late July, 1937?

A. 19:  A tribute to Marconi after his death. 

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Q. 20:  Citizens of which country coined the term ‘Molotov Cocktail’ or ‘Molotov Bread Basket’ to describe their incendiary weapon used against the Soviets in 1939?

A. 20:  Finland

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A New Quiz To Start A New Month

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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What better way to start a new week and a new month than with a good quiz.

It’s the usual random mixture of difficult, easy and tricky

And again as usual the answers are waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below – but NO cheating!

Enjoy.

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Quiz_button 02

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Q.  1:  Where is the only place today comes before yesterday?  

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Q.  2:  What is another way to say “every 9 years”?

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Q.  3:  What US State has almost twice as many caribou as people?

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Q.  4:  What is the only 15 letter word that can be spelled without repeating a letter?

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Q.  5:  What is the national animal of Thailand?

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Q.  6:  What kind of nut has no shell?

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Q.  7:  What is the largest denomination bill produced by the US Treasury?

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Q.  8:  Before Mount Everest was discovered, what was the tallest mountain in the world?           

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Q.  9:  What is the most common atom in the Universe?

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Q. 10:  Whoever makes it tells it not, whoever takes it knows it not, and whoever knows it wants it not. What is it?

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Q. 11:  Which Ocean is saltier, the Atlantic Ocean or the Pacific Ocean?

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Q. 12:  What well known city was originally called Edo?

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Q. 13:  We all know about the Titanic and probably seen the movies about the disaster. The full name of the Titanic ship is R.M.S. Titanic, but what do the letters “R.M.S.” stand for?

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Q. 14:  What was the tallest structure in the world prior to the construction of the Empire State Building in 1930?

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Q. 15:  Construction workers hard hats were first invented and used in 1933 in the building of what?

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Q. 16:  What is black when you buy it, red when you use it, and gray when you throw it away?     

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Q. 17:  What belongs to you, but is used mostly by others?       

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Q. 18:  If you keep a Goldfish in the dark room what color will it eventually turn?

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Q. 19:  What famous American invented the rocking chair?

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Q. 20:  Which Corset Company, with a very famous name not necessarily related to the corset business, created the bra cup sizing system, which is now used universally by manufacturers?

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ANSWERS

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Q.  1:  Where is the only place today comes before yesterday?  

A.  1:  In a Dictionary

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Q.  2:  What is another way to say “every 9 years”?

A.  2:  Another way to say “every 9 years” is “Novennial”

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Q.  3:  What US State has almost twice as many caribou as people?

A.  3:  The state of Alaska has almost twice as many caribou as people.

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Q.  4:  What is the only 15 letter word that can be spelled without repeating a letter?

A.  4:  The only 15 letter word that can be spelled without repeating a letter is “uncopyrightable”.

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Q.  5:  What is the national animal of Thailand?

A.  5:  The elephant is the national animal of Thailand

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Q.  6:  What kind of nut has no shell?

A.  6:  A doughnut.

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Q.  7:  What is the largest denomination bill produced by the US Treasury?

A.  7:  The largest denomination bill U.S. bill produced by the US Treasury is for $100,000.

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Q.  8:  Before Mount Everest was discovered, what was the tallest mountain in the world?           

A.  8:  Mount Everest, just because it hadn’t been discovered didn’t mean it wasn’t there!

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Q.  9:  What is the most common atom in the Universe?

A.  9:  Hydrogen is the most common atom in the universe

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Q. 10:  Whoever makes it tells it not, whoever takes it knows it not, and whoever knows it wants it not. What is it?

A. 10:  Counterfeit Money

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Q. 11:  Which Ocean is saltier, the Atlantic Ocean or the Pacific Ocean?

A. 11:  The Atlantic Ocean is saltier than the Pacific Ocean

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Q. 12:  What well known city was originally called Edo?

A. 12:  The city of Tokyo was originally called Edo

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Q. 13:  We all know about the Titanic and probably seen the movies about the disaster. The full name of the Titanic ship is R.M.S. Titanic, but what do the letters “R.M.S.” stand for?

A. 13:  “R.M.S.” stands for Royal Mail Steamship

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Q. 14:  What was the tallest structure in the world prior to the construction of the Empire State Building in 1930?

A. 14:  The Eiffel Tower was the tallest structure in the world prior to the construction of the Empire State Building in 1930.

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Q. 15:  Construction workers hard hats were first invented and used in 1933 in the building of what?

A. 15:  Construction workers hard hats were first invented and used in 1933 in the building of the Hoover Dam.

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Q. 16:  What is black when you buy it, red when you use it, and gray when you throw it away?     

A. 16:  Charcoal

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Q. 17:  What belongs to you, but is used mostly by others?       

A. 17:  Your Name

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Q. 18:  If you keep a Goldfish in the dark room what color will it eventually turn?

A. 18:  A lot of people think it will become darker and eventually black because there is no light, but the reverse is actually the case, it will become paler and eventually turn white. This is because the pigmentation cells in the fish’s scales that control color cannot work without light.

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Q. 19:  What famous American invented the rocking chair?

A. 19:  Benjamin Franklin invented the rocking chair.

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Q. 20:  Which Corset Company, with a very famous name not necessarily related to the corset business, created the bra cup sizing system, which is now used universally by manufacturers?

A. 20:  Warner Brothers Corset Company!

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How did you do?

Maybe We Should Rename Monday As Quiz Day?

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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There, you have had the first question in the title. So should we?

If that one is too easy try this random selection of questions. As usual there are some easy, some tricky, but most of them difficult enough, unless you know the answers, of course!.

And just in case you don’t know some of the answers, they are, as ever, given waaaaaaaaaaay down below.

But NO cheating please!

Enjoy.

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quiz 2

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Q  1:  Who was originally called “Happy Rabbit”?

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Q  2:  In Italy who is known by the name Babbo Natale?

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Q  3:  What did Thailand used to be called?

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Q  4:  Until 1796, there was a state in the United States called Franklin. Today it is known as what?

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Q  5:  What is the only nation whose name begins with an “A” but doesn’t end in an “A”?

(Hint: you have heard about this place a LOT)

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Q  6:  Astronaut Neil Armstrong was the first man who stepped on the moon, but which foot landed first?

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Q  7:  What is the only domestic animal not mentioned in the Bible?

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Q  8:  What is the only muscle in your body that is attached at only one end?

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Q  9:  A group of rhinos is called what?

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Q 10:  What is the most popular first name in the world?

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Q 11:  What city stands on about 120 small islands?

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Q 12:  What is Barbie’s full name?

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Q 13:  Which is bigger, England or the US state of Florida?

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Q 14:  What are the United State’s only mobile National Monuments?

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Q 15:  Who was the only unmarried president of the US?

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Q 16:  In the 1940’s, what changed its name from Bich for fear that Americans would pronounce it ‘Bitch.’

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Q 17:  What is the only country in the world where windmills turn clockwise?

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Q 18:  What is the only movie to have its sequel released the same year (1933)?

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Q 19:  In humans it is called an epidemic, but what is it called when it affects animals?

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Q 20:  The Don McLean song, “American Pie” was named after what?

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ANSWERS

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Q  1:  Who was originally called “Happy Rabbit”?

A  1:  Bugs Bunny

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Q  2:  In Italy who is known by the name Babbo Natale?

A  2:  Santa Claus

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Q  3:  What did Thailand used to be called?

A  3:  Siam

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Q  4:  Until 1796, there was a state in the United States called Franklin. Today it is known as what?

A  4:  Tennessee

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Q  5:  What is the only nation whose name begins with an “A” but doesn’t end in an “A”?

(Hint: you have heard about this place a LOT)

A  5:  Afghanistan

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Q  6:  Astronaut Neil Armstrong was the first man who stepped on the moon, but which foot landed first?

A  6:  His left foot

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Q  7:  What is the only domestic animal not mentioned in the Bible?

A  7:  The cat

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Q  8:  What is the only muscle in your body that is attached at only one end?

A  8:  Your tongue

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Q  9:  A group of rhinos is called what?

A  9:  A crash

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Q 10:  What is the most popular first name in the world?

A 10:  Muhammad

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Q 11:  What city stands on about 120 small islands?

A 11:  Venice

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Q 12:  What is Barbie’s full name?

A 12:  “Babara Millicent Roberts.”

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Q 13:  Which is bigger, England or the US state of Florida?

A 13:  The state of Florida

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Q 14:  What are the United State’s only mobile National Monuments?

A 14:  The San Francisco Cable cars

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Q 15:  Who was the only unmarried president of the US?

A 15:  James Buchanan

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Q 16:  In the 1940’s, what changed its name from Bich for fear that Americans would pronounce it ‘Bitch.’

A 16:  The “Bic” pen

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Q 17:  What is the only country in the world where windmills turn clockwise?

A 17:  Ireland

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Q 18:  What is the only movie to have its sequel released the same year (1933)?

A 18:  “King Kong” and “Son Of Kong”

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Q 19:  In humans it is called an epidemic, but what is it called when it affects animals?

A 19:  An epizootic

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Q 20:  The Don McLean song, “American Pie” was named after what?

A 20:  The airplane Buddy Holly died in was the “American Pie.”

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Crikey! Not Another Quiz?

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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Yes, I’m afraid so. Another Monday quiz to get the brain working for the rest of the week.

As usual we have a varied and random selection of questions, some easy, some tricky, but most of them difficult enough.

Especially if you don’t know the answers, which as ever are given waaaaaaaaaaay down below.

But NO cheating please!

Enjoy.

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Quiz 5

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Q  1:  Who invented Basketball and what was his nationality?

Well, okay, that’s a pretty tough one to begin with, so you get a point just for getting the nationality right. 

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Q  2:  What are three consecutive strikes in bowling called?

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Q  3:  By what name is the Red Cross known in Arab countries?

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Q  4:  What is most household dust is made up of?

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Q  5:  Who was the first person on the sci-fi TV series Star Trek to say the words, “Beam me up, Scotty”?

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Q  6:  Two legendary Americans were among those who died at the battle of The Alamo.

Can you name at least one?

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Q  7:  Who lives longer on average, right handed people, or left handed people?

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Q  8:  In the U.S, which one of these four items outsells the other three combined?

Baseballs

Basketballs

Frisbees

Footballs

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Q  9:  You have seen this many many times but have you noticed it?

What is the time displayed on most watch advertisements?

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Q 10:  What is peculiar, unusual or noteworthy about the words “facetious” and “abstemious”?

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Q 11:  It is well known that the Apollo 11 mission was the first to land men on the Moon.

But the crew from which Apollo mission were the last men to set foot on the moon?

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Q 12:  On a ship what is a toilet called?

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Q 13:  What is the name of the squiggly line “~” on keyboards?

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Q 14:  By what name is actress Caryn Elaine Johnson better known?

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Q 15:  What was the first country to issue postage stamps in 1840?

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Q 16:  What was the former name of the country now known as Iran?

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Q 17:  In 1783, the hot air balloon was invented where?

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Q 18:  What are the markings that are found on dice called?

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Q 19:  Water that is safe to drink is referred to as what?

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Q 20:  What is the second largest French speaking city after Paris?

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ANSWERS

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Q  1:  Who invented Basketball and what was his nationality?

A  1:  James Naismith in 1891. He was Canadian. 

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Q  2:  What are three consecutive strikes in bowling called?

A  2:  A turkey

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Q  3:  By what name is the Red Cross known in Arab countries?

A  3:  The Red Crescent

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Q  4:  What is most household dust is made up of?

A  4:  Most household dust is made up of dead skin cells.

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Q  5:  Who was the first person on the sci-fi TV series Star Trek to say the words, “Beam me up, Scotty”?

A  5:  Nobody. Contrary to popular myth, they NEVER said “Beam me up, Scotty” on Star Trek.

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Q  6:  Two legendary Americans were among those who died at the battle of The Alamo.

Can you name at least one?

A  6:  Jim Bowie and Davy Crockett

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Q  7:  Who lives longer on average, right handed people, or left handed people?

A  7:  Right handed people live, on average, nine years longer than left handed people do.

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Q  8:  In the U.S, which one of these four items outsells the other three combined?

Baseballs

Basketballs

Frisbees

Footballs

A  8:  In the U.S, frisbees outsell footballs, baseballs and basketballs combined.

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Q  9:  You have seen this many many times but have you noticed it?

What is the time displayed on most watch advertisements?

A  9:  In most watch advertisements the time displayed on a watch is 10:10.

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Q 10:  What is peculiar, unusual or noteworthy about the words “facetious” and “abstemious”?

A 10:  The words “facetious” and “abstemious” contain all the vowels in the correct order.

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Q 11:  It is well known that the Apollo 11 mission was the first to land men on the Moon.

But the crew from which Apollo mission were the last men to set foot on the moon?

A 11:  Apollo 17

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Q 12:  On a ship what is a toilet called?

A 12:  The head

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Q 13:  What is the name of the squiggly line “~” on keyboards?

A 13:  A tilde

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Q 14:  By what name is actress Caryn Elaine Johnson better known?

A 14:  Whoopi Goldberg

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Q 15:  What was the first country to issue postage stamps in 1840?

A 15:  Great Britain

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Q 16:  What was the former name of the country now known as Iran?

A 16:  Persia

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Q 17:  In 1783, the hot air balloon was invented where?

A 17:  The hot air balloon was invented in France.

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Q 18:  What are the markings that are found on dice called?

A 18:  The markings found on dice are called “pips.”

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Q 19:  Water that is safe to drink is referred to as what?

A 19:  Potable

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Q 20:  What is the second largest French speaking city after Paris?

A 20:  Montreal

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What A Way To Start The Week – A Test!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

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What better way to start the week than with a surprise test?

Some of these are easy and some of them difficult. But as usual all that depends on whether or not you know the answers.

You can check how you did by looking at the answers waaaaaaay down below as usual, BUT no cheating!

Here we go…

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Quiz 5

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Q 1:  Who was the first American astronaut in space?

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Q 2:  What is the only living tissue in the human body that does not contain any blood vessels?

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Q 3:  What was the first U.S. city to host the summer Olympics in 1904?

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Q 4:  The sport of surfing originated in which US State?

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Q 5:  Who led the famous revolt of the Roman slaves and gladiators in 73 B.C

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Q 6:  Where is the “Fat Tuesday” fesival celebrated every year?

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Q 7:  In 1867 the U.S. paid Russia $7.2 million. What for?

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Q 8:  Who was the only unmarried president of the United States?

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Q 9:  What was the first US State to give women the right to vote?

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Q 10:  What was the first British ship to use the SOS distress signal?

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Q 11:  In a pack of playing cards which is the only king without a mustache?

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Q 12:  The last land battle of the U.S. Civil War was fought in which US State?

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Q 13:  What is the national sport of Japan?

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Q 14:  What country is made up of 13,667 islands?

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Q 15:  One of the famous Disney Theme Parks is called EPCOT. But what do the letters E-P-C-O-T stand for?

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ANSWERS

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Q 1:  Who was the first American astronaut in space?

A 1:  Alan B. Shepard Jr

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Q 2:  What is the only living tissue in the human body that does not contain any blood vessels?

A 2:  The cornea

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Q 3:  What was the first U.S. city to host the summer Olympics in 1904?

A 3:  St. Louis, Missouri

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Q 4:  The sport of surfing originated in which US State?

A 4:  Hawaii

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Q 5:  Who led the famous revolt of the Roman slaves and gladiators in 73 B.C

A 5:  Spartacus

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Q 6:  Where is the “Fat Tuesday” fesival celebrated every year?

A 6:  New Orleans, Louisiana it is better known as Mardi Gras

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Q 7:  In 1867 the U.S. paid Russia $7.2 million. What for?

A 7:  For Alaska

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Q 8:  Who was the only unmarried president of the United States?

A 8:  James Buchanan

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Q 9:  What was the first US State to give women the right to vote?

A 9:  Wyoming

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Q 10:  What was the first British ship to use the SOS distress signal?

A 10:  The Titanic

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Q 11:  In a pack of playing cards which is the only king without a mustache?

A 11:  The king of hearts

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Q 12:  The last land battle of the U.S. Civil War was fought in which US State?

A 12:  Texas

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Q 13:  What is the national sport of Japan?

A 13:  Sumo wrestling

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Q 14:  What country is made up of 13,667 islands?

A 14:  Indonesia

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Q 15:  One of the famous Disney Theme Parks is called EPCOT. But what do the letters E-P-C-O-T stand for?

A 15:  EPCOT stands for “Experimental Prototype City Of Tomorrow.”

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