As Syndromes Go, I Have A Good One Today. Enjoy The Facts.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

There seems to be syndromes for just about anything these days/

Maybe that would make a good post on its own.

For today however you will have to be content with just one, mixed in with a lot of other facts too.

.

syndrome

.

.

Apparently in San Francisco

it is illegal to dry your car

with used underwear.

dry your car

.

.

Since the Space Shuttle electronics were

so outdated and nobody made them anymore,

NASA actually resorted to buying spare parts

on websites like eBay

Space Shuttle electronics

.

.

Only about 226,000 underwater marine species

have been identified and scientists estimate that

there could be up to 25 million marine species

living in the oceans.

This means less than 1% of all underwater

marine life has been discovered.

underwater marine species

.

.

Machu Picchu, the Incan citadel set high

in the Andes Mountains in Peru,

was so high in the mountains that it

wasn’t discovered until 1911.

Machu Picchu

.

.

If it were a country,

McDonald’s would be the 90th richest

country on Earth.

McDonald's country

.

.

In the 80’s Romanian President Nicolae Ceausescu

had the game of scrabble banned and described it

as “overly intellectual” and a “subversive evil”.

scrabble help

.

.

Discovered in 1852 and named after

the Greek mythological figure Psyche,

16 Psyche is a one of the largest metal asteroids

in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.

Unlike most of other metal asteroids,

Psyche shows no sign of the presence of water

and is believed to have a purely iron-nickel composition.

16 Psyche

.

.

After falling asleep in class and being awakened

by a teacher smacking her palm down on his desk,

a 16 year old’s parents decided to sue the

Connecticut Board of Education

for the hearing loss he suffered.

Connecticut Board of Education

.

.

The thing that is always used

to measure your foot at the shoe store

is called a Brannock Device.

Brannock Device

.

.

Heart attack guns exist.

According to disclosures by the CIA in 1975,

there is such a thing as a ‘heart attack gun’.

It fires a bullet made of ice, dipped in shellfish toxin

that immediately induces a heart attack.

heart attack gun

.

.

The first solo person to circumnavigate the globe

using only human power

was Erden Eruc of Turkey who

walked and rowed right around the world!

Erden Eruc

.

.

Paris Syndrome is a real psychological syndrome

that affects mostly Japanese people when they realize

that Paris isn’t as great a place as they thought it would be.

The Japanese embassy in France even has a

special hotline that tourists can call.

Symptoms include nausea and headaches.

 

Paris Syndrome

 

.

====================================

.

 

Can You Handle The Quiz?

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Hi and welcome to another week.

Today’s quiz has a few questions that I think you will find quite challenging, plus one or two that you should breeze through with ease.

But the only way to find out is to have a go.

And remember, as always, if you get stuck, you can find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating!

Enjoy and good luck.

.

Quiz 07

.

Q.  1:  What goes up and down, but still remains in the same place?

.

.

Q.  2:  Who directed both JFK and Nixon?

.

.

Q.  3:  Before being harvested and sold, an individual cranberry must bounce at least how many inches high to make sure they aren’t too ripe?

           a)  2 inches            b)  3 inches            c)  4 inches            d)  5 inches

.

.

Q.  4:  What World War II British naval intelligence officer wrote the children’s story ‘Chitty-Chitty-Bang-Bang’?

.

.

Q.  5:  Who is the only US President who was never elected as either President or Vice President?

.

.

Q.  6:  The ‘H-3’ and the ‘H-4’, built in 1757 and 1759 were mechanical wonders.  Who constructed them both and what were they used for?  (A point for each correct answer and a bonus point if you get them both correct.)

.

.

Q.  7:  What does the term ‘Cornucopia’ mean?

.

.

Q.  8:  To nearest 1000, in the year 1800 how many wild turkeys were there in Turkey?

.

.

Q.  9:  The two oldest universities in Europe are both found in which country?  

           a) France              b) England              c) Italy              d) Greece

.

.

Q. 10:  Who was the tallest President of the United States and who was the shortest? (A point for each correct answer and a bonus point if you get them both correct.)

.

.

Q. 11:  In which 1949 movie did Sir Alec Guinness famously play the role of eight different members of the D’Ascoyne family?

.

.

Q. 12:  Who won this year’s (2014) Formula One World Driver’s Championship and what was his nationality? (A point for each correct answer and a bonus point if you get them both correct.)

.

.

Q. 13:  ‘Fionn mac Cumhaill’, ‘Bergrisar’, ‘Daityas’, ‘Patagons’ and ‘Nephilims’ are all examples of what?

.

.

Q. 14:  What does ‘IMAX’, as in the large screen IMAX Cinemas stand for?

.

.

Q. 15:  Which boxer’s first professional fight was against Tunney Hunsaker, Police Chief of Fayetteville, West Virginia, on October 29, 1960?

.

.

Q. 16:  Which Portuguese-born navigator was the first European to cross the Pacific Ocean?

.

.

Q. 17:  Who was the first Twitter user to reach 20 million followers?

.

.

Q. 18:  Which martial art takes its name from the Japanese for ‘way of the sword’?

.

.

Q. 19:  What color is ‘Absynth’?

.

.

Q. 20:  Which popular singer and movie star had a ‘secret love’ in 1954 and in which famous movie did it feature? (A point for each correct answer and a bonus point if you get them both correct.)

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

ANSWERS

.

Q.  1:  What goes up and down, but still remains in the same place?

A.  1:  Stairs!

.

.

Q.  2:  Who directed both JFK and Nixon?

A.  2:  Oliver Stone.

.

.

Q.  3:  Before being harvested and sold, an individual cranberry must bounce at least how many inches high to make sure they aren’t too ripe?

           a)  2 inches            b)  3 inches            c)  4 inches            d)  5 inches

A.  3:  The correct answer is c)  4 inches.

.

.

Q.  4:  What World War II British naval intelligence officer wrote the children’s story ‘Chitty-Chitty-Bang-Bang’?

A.  4:  Ian Fleming, much better known as author of the James Bond novels.

.

.

Q.  5:  Who is the only US President who was never elected as either President or Vice President?

A.  5:  Gerald R Ford, who became the 40th Vice-President when Spiro Agnew resigned the position and who subsequently became the 38th President of the USA, when he took over the job after Richard M Nixon resigned.

.

.

Q.  6:  The ‘H-3’ and the ‘H-4’, built in 1757 and 1759 were mechanical wonders.  Who constructed them both and what were they used for?  (A point for each correct answer and a bonus point if you get them both correct.)

A.  6:  John Harrison.   H-3 and H-4 were the first successful maritime chronometers.

.

.

Q.  7:  What does the term ‘Cornucopia’ mean?

A.  7:  Literally ‘Horn of Plenty’, used as a symbol of abundance.

.

.

Q.  8:  To nearest 1000, in the year 1800 how many wild turkeys were there in Turkey?

A.  8:  The correct answer is ‘None’, the wild turkey it is a native North American bird.

.

.

Q.  9:  The two oldest universities in Europe are both found in which country?  

           a) France              b) England              c) Italy              d) Greece

A.  9:  Many people think it is England with the famous Oxford and Cambridge Universities, but the correct answer is  c) Italy.  Parma (1065 AD) and Bologna (1119 AD)

.

.

Q. 10:  Who was the tallest President of the United States and who was the shortest? (A point for each correct answer and a bonus point if you get them both correct.)

A. 10:  Abraham Lincoln was the tallest at 6′ 4″, and James Madison was the shortest at 5′ 4″.

.

.

Q. 11:  In which 1949 movie did Sir Alec Guinness famously play the role of eight different members of the D’Ascoyne family?

A. 11:  Kind Hearts and Coronets.

.

.

Q. 12:  Who won this year’s (2014) Formula One World Driver’s Championship and what was his nationality? (A point for each correct answer and a bonus point if you get them both correct.)

A. 12:  Lewis Hamilton who is British.

.

.

Q. 13:  ‘Fionn mac Cumhaill’, ‘Bergrisar’, ‘Daityas’, ‘Patagons’ and ‘Nephilims’ are all examples of what?

A. 13:  Giants.

.

.

Q. 14:  What does ‘IMAX’, as in the large screen IMAX Cinemas stand for?

A. 14:  IMAX stands for ‘Image Maximum’.

.

.

Q. 15:  Which boxer’s first professional fight was against Tunney Hunsaker, Police Chief of Fayetteville, West Virginia, on October 29, 1960?

A. 15:  Cassius Clay. (Sorry, but you do not score a point if you only said ‘Muhammad Ali’, he did not change his name until 15 years later after converting to Sunni Islam in 1975.)

.

.

Q. 16:  Which Portuguese-born navigator was the first European to cross the Pacific Ocean?

A. 16:  Ferdinand Magellan (1480 – 1521).

.

.

Q. 17:  Who was the first Twitter user to reach 20 million followers?

A. 17:  Lady Gaga.

.

.

Q. 18:  Which martial art takes its name from the Japanese for ‘way of the sword’?

A. 18:  Kendo.

.

.

Q. 19:  What color is ‘Absynth’?

A. 19:  Green.

.

.

Q. 20:  Which popular singer and movie star had a ‘secret love’ in 1954 and in which famous movie did it feature? (A point for each correct answer and a bonus point if you get them both correct.)

A. 20:  Doris Day and the movie was Calamity Jane.

.

.

===============================================

.

Did You Know? – I Didn’t.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Yes, I have to admit that many of the facts that I use on these posts are just as big a surprise to me as they possibly are to you.

But I hope interesting, as well.

Here is the latest batch from the archives.

Enjoy.

.

facts 04

.

There are 13 ways to spell

the “o” sound in French

the-simpsons-d-oh

.

.

There is a planet called HD189733b

where it rains glass sideways.

planet HD189733b

.

.

The language of the Native American Zuni tribe

has resemblances to Japanese.

Subsequent research confirmed

biological similarities between the groups.

Native American Zuni tribe

.

.

For a long time the world believed Troy to be a mythical city

and the Trojan War to be little more than legend,

until Heinrich Schliemann discovered the actual remains of the city.

Troy

.

.

Despite the common myth that large brains equal more intelligence,

people like Einstein actually had a smaller brain

(only difference is, he used his!)

Einstein

.

.

Vikings didn’t have horns on their helmets.

Viking helmet

.

.

A man  named James Boole survived a fall of 6,000 feet

without a parachute with only a broken back and ribs.

It is estimated that when Boole hit the ground,

he was falling at about 100 kilometers per hour.

James Boole

.

.

There is no such thing as a banana tree,

bananas grow on a banana plant.

banana plant

.

.

Nuclear rain from the Chernobyl disaster

fell as far away as Ireland

where sheep farmers were banned from

selling their animals for human consumption for a time.

chernobyl-radiation-map

.

.

For years Big Pharma made $millions off selling people

anti-stress drugs to cure their ulcers,

until an Australian scientist proved the ulcers

were quite often caused by bacteria and were easily curable.

anti-stress drugs

.

.

Fourteen of the original rides from

Disneyland’s 1955 opening are still in operation.

original rides from Disneyland

.

.

Nice comes from a Latin word meaning “ignorant”.

nescius

.

.

Side by side, 2000 cells from the human body

could cover about one square inch.

cells from the human body

.

.

When Robert Williams tried to retrieve

a faulty part at a Ford Motor’s casting plant,

the malfunctioning machine reactivated

and its arm slammed into his head, killing him instantly.

He is the first man in history to have been killed by a robot.

Ford Motor Company robot

.

.

In one of the stupidest decision

in the history of the music industry,

Decca Records turned down the Beatles

because they “weren’t sellable”.

.

.

==========================================

.

Welcome To The First Fasab Quiz For June

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Welcome to Quiz Day.

Another month has appeared on the calendar. Unbelievably we’re almost half way through 2014 already!

But what better way to start the first week of another month than with another twenty brain-buster questions.

Business, politics, geography, history, nature, movies and music are all in here this week.

Let’s see how you do.

Enjoy and good luck.

.

quiz 09

.

Q.  1:  What do octopus’ and goat’s eyes have in common?

.

.

Q.  2:  What common English word comes from the French expression meaning “death pledge”?

.

.

Q.  3:  Adjusting for inflation, which of these two men is the richest man in history, John D Rockerfeller or Bill Gates?

.

.

Q.  4:  What is the term for yawning and stretching at the same time?

.

.

Q.  5:  What US President is famous for having filed a report for a UFO sighting in 1973, calling it “the darndest thing I’ve ever seen.”

.

.

Q.  6:  In the last 4000 years, how many new animals have been domesticated?

.

.

Q.  7:  What is the Greek version of the Old Testament called?

.

.

Q.  8:  Soweto is a very famous location on the outskirts of Johannesburg in South Africa, but how did it get its name?

.

.

Q.  9:  Between 1926 and 1976, John Wayne appeared in over 170 motion pictures, and became one of America’s biggest box office stars, but what was the title of his last movie?

.

.

Q. 10:  What is the only month in recorded history not to have a full moon? (Two bonus points if you can name the year too.)

.

.

Q. 11:  what was the only part of the United States that was invaded by the Japanese during WWII?

.

.

Q. 12:  Why do spiral staircases in medieval castles run clockwise?

.

.

Q. 13:  What are the only birds able to fly backwards.

.

.

Q. 14:  If you were standing in the northernmost point in the contiguous (48) US states, what state would you be standing in?

.

.

Q. 15:  Name the six main characters in the long running TV comedy series ‘The Beverly Hillbillies’? (A point for each and bonus points if you can name the actors who played them.)

.

.

Q. 16:  What is the only Canadian Province that borders the Great Lakes?

.

.

Q. 17:  Only four letters in the latin alphabet look the same if you turn them upside down or see them from behind, a point for each one you can name correctly?

.

.

Q. 18:  Previously set in Los Angeles, Washington DC and New York, what City is the location for the latest series of the hit TV show ‘24’?

.

.

Q. 19:  What is the only US State that begins with an “A” but does not end with an “A”?

.

.

Q. 20:  Who shared ‘Endless Love’ with Luther Van-Dross in 1994?

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

ANSWERS

.

Q.  1:  What do octopus’ and goat’s eyes have in common?

A.  1:  Both have rectangular pupils.

.

.

Q.  2:  What common English word comes from the French expression meaning “death pledge”?

A.  2:  The common English word ‘mortgage’ comes from the French expression meaning “death pledge”.

.

.

Q.  3:  Adjusting for inflation, which of these two men is the richest man in history, John D Rockerfeller or Bill Gates?

A.  3:  When adjusted for inflation, John D Rockerfeller is the richest man in the history of the world,  with a net worth 10 times more than Bill Gates.

.

.

Q.  4:  What is the term for yawning and stretching at the same time?

A.  4:  When you yawn and stretch at the time, you are “pandiculating.”

.

.

Q.  5:  What US President is famous for having filed a report for a UFO sighting in 1973, calling it “the darndest thing I’ve ever seen.”

A.  5:  Jimmy Carter filed a report for a UFO sighting in 1973.

.

.

Q.  6:  In the last 4000 years, how many new animals have been domesticated?

A.  6:  Bit of a trick question, in the last 4000 years, no new animals have been domesticated. Take a point if you answered ‘none’ or ‘zero’.

.

.

Q.  7:  What is the Greek version of the Old Testament called?

A.  7:  The Greek version of the Old Testament is called the ‘Septuagint’.

.

.

Q.  8:  Soweto is a very famous location on the outskirts of Johannesburg in South Africa, but how did it get its name?

A.  8:  Soweto in South Africa was derived from SOuth WEst TOwnship.

.

.

Q.  9:  Between 1926 and 1976, John Wayne appeared in over 170 motion pictures, and became one of America’s biggest box office stars, but what was the title of his last movie?

A.  9:  John Wayne’s final movie was ‘The Shootist’, made in 1976 and in which he played the part of aging former gunslinger John Bernard Books.

.

.

Q. 10:  What is the only month in recorded history not to have a full moon? (Two bonus points if you can name the year too.)

A. 10:  February 1865 is the only month in recorded history not to have a full moon.

.

.

Q. 11:  what was the only part of the United States that was invaded by the Japanese during WWII?

A. 11:  Alaska was the only part of the United States that was invaded by the Japanese during WWII. The territory was the island of Adak in the Aleutian Chain. Pearl Harbor, Hawaii was attacked, but not invaded.

.

.

Q. 12:  Why do spiral staircases in medieval castles run clockwise?

A. 12:  Spiral staircases in medieval castles run clockwise because all knights used to be right-handed and would therefore carry their swords in their right hand.

.

.

Q. 13:  What are the only birds able to fly backwards.

A. 13:  Hummingbirds are the only birds able to fly backwards.

.

.

Q. 14:  If you were standing in the northernmost point in the contiguous (48) US states, what state would you be standing in?

A. 14:  If you were standing in the northernmost point in the contiguous (48) US states, you’d be standing in Minnesota.

.

.

Q. 15:  Name the six main characters in the long running TV comedy series ‘The Beverly Hillbillies’? (A point for each and bonus points if you can name the actors who played them.)

A. 15: The characters in the Beverly Hillbillies were Jed Clampett, Granny, Ellie May, Jethro, unscrupulous banker Mr Drysdale and his long-suffering assistant Miss Hathaway, played respectively by Buddy Ebsen, Irene Ryan, Donna Douglas, Max Baer, Jr., Raymond Bailey and Nancy Kulp.

.

.

Q. 16:  What is the only Canadian Province that borders the Great Lakes?

A. 16:  Ontario is the only Canadian Province that borders the Great Lakes.

.

.

Q. 17:  Only four letters in the latin alphabet look the same if you turn them upside down or see them from behind, a point for each one you can name correctly?

A. 17:  The only letters in the latin alphabet that look the same if you turn them upside down or see them from behind are  ‘H’  ‘I’   ‘O’  and  ‘X’.

.

.

Q. 18:  Previously set in Los Angeles, Washington DC and New York, what City is the location for the latest series of the hit TV show ‘24’?

A. 18:  The latest series of ‘24’ is set in London, England.

.

.

Q. 19:  What is the only US State that begins with an “A” but does not end with an “A”?

A. 19:  Arkansas is the only US State that begins with “A” but does not end with “A”, all the other States that begin with “A”, Arizona, Alabama and Alaska, also end with “A”.

.

.

Q. 20:  Who shared ‘Endless Love’ with Luther Van-Dross in 1994?

A. 20:  Mariah Carey.

.

.

=================================================

.

Did You Know? It’s Another Fabulous Fasab Fact Day!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Yes folks, another fabulous fasab fact day.

Another random dive into the archives. I’m just as surprised as anyone else with what comes out.

I hope you enjoy.

.

did you know4

.

In 2012 Wallace Weatherholt, a Florida airboat captain

whose hand was bitten off by a 9-foot alligator,

was arrested and charged

with unlawfully feeding an alligator!

Wallace Weatherholt

.

.

The more you talk about a person to others,

the more you fall in love with that person.

handsome and hot

.

.

Adidas was founded by a former member of the Nazi Party, Adolf Dassler.

Adi was a nickname and ‘das’ the first 3 letters of his last name.

Adidas logos

.

.

There are about 7,000 languages in the world.

There are about 2,200 languages in Asia.

1/4 of the world’s population speaks at least some English.

Adidas logos

.

.

There are 12 imaginary languages in Lord of The Rings.

Lord-of-the-Rings-Splash

.

.

The numbers ‘172’ can be found

on the back of the U.S. $5 dollar bill

in the bushes at the base of the Lincoln Memorial.

$5 bill reverse enlarged

.

.

In 1221 Ghengis Khan killed 1,748,000

people at Nishapur in one hour.

(I think he had help!)

Genghis_Khan_ThronePortrait

.

.

The 57 on Heinz ketchup bottles represents the

number of varieties of pickles the company once had.

heinz-ketchup-old-bottle

.

.

There are more politicians in the US

than there are Pandas in the world.

(Were it the other way round I reckon

the country would be in a better condition!)

panda

.

.

There is a Titanic II currently being built as a replica

and successor of the ill-fated Olympic-class RMS Titanic.

The project was announced by Australian billionaire Clive Palmer

in April 2012, as the flagship of his cruise company Blue Star Line,

with an intended launch date in 2016.

The ship’s inaugural voyage will be the same as that of the

original Titanic, from Southampton to New York.

Titanic II

.

.

Diet Coke was only invented in 1982.

Diet Coke

.

.

The most expensive cow in the world is Missy,

a three year old black and white Holstein cow from Canada,

sold for $1.2 million dollars

at the Morsan Road to the Royal Sale in Uxbridge, Ontario.

Missy the most expensive cow in the world

.

.

It is believed that Shakespeare was 46 around the time

that the King James Version of the Bible was written.

In Psalms 46, the 46th word from the first word is shake

and the 46th word from the last word is spear.

Shakespeare

.

.

“Karaoke” means “empty orchestra” in Japanese.

Karaoke

.

.

The man who provided the voice of cartoon legend Bugs Bunny,

Mel Blanc, was in a serious car accident and was in a coma.

After many unsuccessful attempts to get him to talk,

a doctor asked “Bugs can you her me?”

to which Mel responded in the voice of Bugs Bunny,

“What’s up doc?”

The doctors used this to lead him out of the coma.

.

.

======================================

.

As A Rule Of Thumb, Don’t Pick Up Hitchhikers.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

But as a rule of thumb I like puns.

Hope you do too.

Here are some more.

Enjoy!

.

rofl

.

My Japanese penpal dropped out of school recently.

He’s taken leave of his Senseis.

cartoon Sensei

.

.

I’ve got a new job stacking shelves at a supermarket for big, tall men.

It keeps me on my toes.

high shelves

.

.

I was chatting to someone about cylindrical fasteners earlier,

it was a riveting conversation.

Rivets

.

.

Skiers don’t have drunken arguments,

they just storm off-piste.

off piste

.

.

I used to be the managing director of the world’s largest ladder company.

Until I was asked to step down.

dana-fradon-dejected-man-setting-on-top-rung-of-a-ladder-the-steps

.

.

A friend asked if I wanted to buy his motor boat.

I jumped at the chance and bought both.

I can keep the boat on the moat.

moat or boat

.

.

My friend sells knives for a living and he said if I posted

this on the internet he’d give me a cut.

knife

.

.

What numbskull called it the Police / Fire Department Headquarters

and not Guns and Hoses?

guns_and_hoses

.

.

I went for a job interview with the hacking group Anonymous.

Introduced myself…

And that was the end of the interview

occupy-mask

.

.

Just read in the news, that there’s going to be a beauty contest

where all the models are dressed up in newspaper pages.

It must be a Miss Print.

girl wrapped in newspaper

.

.

The A- eam.

Hey, missed a T.

mr-t

.

.

I went through a lot to be with my girlfriend.

She was standing at the other end of the car park.

Parking-lot-picture

.

.

I wish I’d never joined the S and M club.

They tied me into a long term contract.

man-tied to contract

.

.

A driver waved at me to stop my car and asked if I could change attire.

Why would someone assume that I would keep spare clothes with me!

flat-tyre-cartoon

.

.

Heck is where people go to

who don’t believe in Golly.

what-the-heck

.

.

Something tells me my posture might not be so great,

I don’t know.

I just have a hunch.

439346-Royalty-Free-RF-Clip-Art-Illustration-Of-A-Cartoon-Hunchback

.

.

Two red blood cells met and fell in love.

But alas, it was in vein.

blood-cartoon

.

.

My fruit and vegetable business has gone into liquidation.

Now we sell smoothies.

smoothie

.

.

Man, you get a load of boos when

you turn up to an AA meeting pissed.

AA_Meeting_lolwtmk

.

.

I turned up to a McDonald’s job interview

riding piggyback on a Burger King employee.

“Could I just ask what the hell you’re doing?”

the receptionist asked curtly.

“Well,” I explained patiently, “the woman on the phone told me

I should report to Reception on a rival” 

piggyback

.

=====================================

.

Did You Know? – Another Random Fact Feast!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Random fact feast it is.

Another selection of hopefully interesting facts that you didn’t know you didn’t know.

Enjoy.

.

did you know5

.

In Raiders of the Lost Ark there is a

wall carving of R2-D2 and C-3P0 behind the ark

Raiders of the lost ark r2d2 3cpo

.

. 

Chinese Checkers is not Chinese.

It was created in America to circumvent the

patent for a popular boardgame called Halma,

invented by a Boston surgeon named George Howard Monks.

chinese-checkers-hexagonal

.

In the 17th century,

the value of pi was known to 35 decimal places.

Today, to 1.2411 trillion.

pi

.

Technically speaking, Alaska is the northernmost,

westernmost, and easternmost state of the United States.

Parts of the Aleutian Islands cross over the 180th meridian.

Aleutian_Islands_map

.

The original story from “Tales of 1001 Arabian Nights” begins,

“Aladdin was a little Chinese boy.”

1001 Arabian Nights

.

There is a hotel in Sweden built entirely out of ice;

it is rebuilt every year.

unique-ice-hotel-in-sweden-4

.

In 1959, the USSR launched a craft called the Mechta towards the Moon.

It missed, and instead became (inadvertently) the first

man-made satellite to go into orbit around the Sun.

Mechta Lunar Orbiter that missed

.

It has been calculated that in the last 3,500 years,

there have only been 230 years of peace throughout the civilized world.

war graves

.

In the 1987 movie ‘Predator’, the character of the Predator

was originally set up for Jean-Claude Van Damme

to play a martial-arts fighting Predator.

However the producers realized much of the cast

were bodybuilders over 6 feet tall (and Van Damme was clearly smaller)

so they cast the enormous 7’ 21/2” Kevin Peter Hall

so that the Predator could realistically physically dominate

the film’s human characters.

Interestingly Hall also appears in the movie

as the helicopter pilot at the end.

kevin-peter-hall Predator

.

. 

Gatorade’s inventor later created an alcoholic variation,

Hop ’n Gator

— essentially, lemon lime Gatorade mixed with beer.

Hop ’n Gator

.

At the Great Gettysburg Reunion of 1913,

two men purchased a hatchet,

walked to the site where their regiments had fought,

and buried it.

Great Gettysburg Reunion of 1913

.

Though it’s rarely used,

the word referring to half a computer byte

is a “nibble.”

byte nibble

.

Because of the angle at which its esophagus enters its stomach,

the horse is physically unable to vomit.

happy-cartoon-horse

.

The reason why hair turns gray as we age

is because the pigment cells in the hair follicle start to die,

which is responsible for producing “melanin”

which gives the hair colour

George Clooney gray-hair

.

Hydrogen gas is the least dense substance in the world,

at 0.08988g/cc

hydrogen-gas

.

The purpose of gasoline rationing during the Second World War

was not to conserve gas, but to conserve TIRES.

The primary source for natural rubber at the time was Southeast Asia,

much of which was under Japanese control.

WWII gasoline rationing book

.

The concept of Boxing Day, which is on December 26th,

was to give boxes of food and clothing to the poor.

It is now viewed in some countries as a time

to get merchandise from stores at reduced prices

Boxing Day bargains

.

Jewelers Tiffany & Co., based in New York, are responsible

for making the Super Bowl trophy

Tiffany super bowl trophy

.

The world’s most expensive cigarettes.

In 2009, Josh Muszynski used his Visa to buy cigarettes.

Due to a Visa “glitch,” he was charged over 23 quadrillion dollars.

To be exact: $23,148,855,308,184,500

credit card statement

.

The popular hip-shaking dance, the merengue,

got its name from the whisking motion required to make meringue.

.

.

==================================

.