Fasab’s Fact Feast Day!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Hello and welcome to another fact feast day on the fasab blog.

The usual selection of random facts, but with a few extras thrown in as a tribute to the late, great, and apparently much troubled Robin Williams.

Enjoy.

.

did you know2

.

In spite of the larger-than-life legends,

the Pony Express only lasted 19 months

(April 1860 to October 1861)

Pony Express

.

.

According to a published Star Wars encyclopedia,

the real name of the Star Wars robot known to us as ‘R2-D2’,

is actually ‘Second Generation Robotic Droid Series-2’.

Star Wars robots R2D2 and 3CP0

.

.

Robin Williams was awarded a star

on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

in Hollywood, California

on December 12, 1990.

Robin Williams Hollywood Walk of Fame

.

.

The first chocolate bar

suitable enough for widespread consumption

was produced by the Fry’s chocolate factory,

located in Bristol, England in 1847.

Fry's chocolate factory Bristol

.

.

Of the ten deadliest wars every fought,

seven were fought in China

More people died in each of the two largest

than in WWI

war in China

.

.

Up until the 1800s dentures were often

made from the teeth of dead soldiers.

dentures

.

.

Robin Williams devoted much of his time and energy to charities.

For example,

he supported St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

and helped to rebuild the city of Christchurch

after the 2010 earthquake in New Zealand.

Robin Williams; Whoopi Goldberg; Billy Crystal

.

.

In Archi,

a language spoken around the Caspian Sea,

each verb can have up to 1.5 million different conjugations

Archi_pic

.

.

During medieval times animals were put on trial

and sometimes sentenced to death

Medieval animal trials

.

.

Robin Williams co-owned the Rubicon restaurant in San Francisco

with his friend Robert De Niro and

fellow Bay area resident Francis Ford Coppola.

Rubicon restaurant in San Francisco

.

.

You have roughly 70,000 thoughts

every day!

thoughts

.

.

Dung beetles can use the Milky Way to navigate.

(My stars!)

Dung beetles can use the Milky Way to navigate

.

.

The title, “World’s luckiest unluckiest man”

belongs to Frane Selak, a Croatian music teacher,

who has literally escaped the jaws of death seven times.

On January 1962, a train he was on flipped off the tracks

killing 17 passengers. He survived.

In 1963, he was sucked out of a malfunctioning plane door

and landed in a haystack; the plane crashed killing 19 people.

In 1966, a bus Selak was on skidded off the road and into a river

where four passengers drowned.

1970 and 1973 his car caught on fire;

1995 he was struck by a bus

and in 1996 he drove into a gorge.

Frane Selak

.

.

In 1911, French tailor Franz Reichelt

decided to test his invention,

a combination overcoat and parachute,

by jumping off the Eiffel Tower.

It didn’t work.

Franz Reichelt Eiffel Tower

.

.

Robin WIlliams is also the author of many

both humorous and serious quotes such as:

“Reality is just a crutch for people

who can’t cope with drugs.“

Or

“No matter what people tell you,

words and ideas can change the world.“

.

.

=====================================================

.

What Watch? Ten Watch. Such Much?

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

You hear now and again on the media about criminal masterminds. And Hollywood is prone to making movies showing these master criminals pulling off some incredible heist or other, like the Ocean’s movie trilogy starring George Clooney and Brad Pitt.

But by and large most of the criminals out there are as dumb as they come, as was noted in previous posts, for example, “Some Of The Dumbest Getaways In History” or “Little Dumb And Large Dumber”.

What that says about the police whose capture rate for small time criminals is depressingly low is itself depressing.

Sometimes though, the criminals are so dumb that they catch themselves.

Such was the case recently in Dublin, Ireland when a blundering bomber attempted to place a bomb underneath a Volvo SUV belonging to a local businessman. I don’t know the reason for the attempted bombing and for the purposes of this post it doesn’t really matter.

What does matter is that the dunce planting the bomb under the vehicle was caught in his own explosion because….

 .

….wait for it….

 .

the bomb went off sooner than he expected since he had forgotten about the Daylight Saving Time change in Ireland last weekend and didn’t put his watch forward.

The injured criminal idiot was apparently seen stumbling from the scene “dripping in blood” and getting into a taxi on the junction of New Street and Clanbrassil Street in Dublin.

You can’t really make things like this up – and actually with morons like this on the lose you don’t have to.

One for the Darwin Awards if he has the decency to expire and remove himself from the gene pool.

.

.

=======================================

.

The Quizzes March On!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Another month and another quiz to get it off to a challenging start.

One or two relatively easy ones today, but I think most of them you will find tough enough.

As usual, if you get stuck, you can find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating!

Enjoy and good luck.

.

Quiz 5

.

Q.  1:  What is the official language of Brazil?

.

.

Q.  2:  Which wife of a politician said in 1981, ‘Woman is like a teabag: you can’t tell how strong she is until you put her in the hot water’?

.

.

Q.  3:  Many expanses of water of varying sizes are designated as ‘seas’ such as the Mediterranean Sea, the Dead Sea, etc. But what is the only such sea in the world that does not have a coastline?

.

.

Q.  4:  What book was Denzel Washington protecting in the 2010 movie?

.

.

Q.  5:  What is both unusual and famous about the restaurant in Volterra, Italy called  “Fortezza Medicea”?

.

.

Q.  6:  In which city is the music recording company Motown based?

.

.

Q.  7:  The official country retreat of the President of the USA, Camp David, is located in which mountains?

.

.

Q.  8:  Where did the Incas originate?

.

.

Q.  9:  What was the name of the Cuban President over thrown by Fidel Castro in 1959?

.

.

Q. 10:  Although the United States has Roswell and Area 51, and Hollywood has pushed out a unending stream of movies based on them, the government does not officially recognize the existence of UFOs. However three well known countries do formally recognize the existence of UFOs, can you name them? (A point for each and a bonus point if you can name all three.)

.

.

Q. 11:  Who was coming to dinner with Spencer Tracy and Katherine Hepburn in 1967?

.

.

Q. 12:  Who was dubbed “Lenin’s left leg” during the early stages of Russia’s Marxist movement? 

.

.

Q. 13:  In which US city was the first skyscraper built in 1883?

.

.

Q. 14:  A double question with multiple points. The US State Department currently recognizes 194 different countries in the world, but how many take up approximately half of Earth’s land area?

HINT: It is a relatively small number of the 194 total and there is a bonus point for each of them that you can name.

.

.

Q. 15:  What phrase is the unlikely link between Barbara Streisand and Bugs Bunny?

.

.

Q. 16:  What is the only state in the Middle East in which there is no desert?

.

.

Q. 17:  What former Soviet state is currently experiencing massive civil unrest and upheaval?

.

.

Q. 18:  Which river has the largest delta?

.

.

Q. 19:  Whoopie Goldberg played one in a movie and Patricia Arquette played another in a television series, what were they? (And bonus points if you can name the movie and the tv series.)

.

.

Q. 20:  Which movie other than ‘The Bodyguard’ featured the song “I Will Always Love You”?

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

ANSWERS

.

Q.  1:  What is the official language of Brazil?

A.  1:  Portuguese.

.

.

Q.  2:  Which wife of a politician said in 1981, ‘Woman is like a teabag: you can’t tell how strong she is until you put her in the hot water’?

A.  2:  Nancy Reagan.

.

.

Q.  3:  Many expanses of water of varying sizes are designated as ‘seas’ such as the Mediterranean Sea, the Dead Sea, etc. But what is the only such sea in the world that does not have a coastline?

A.  3:  The Sargasso Sea in the middle of the North Atlantic Ocean is surrounded by ocean currents and no land and therefore has no coast.

.

.

Q.  4:  What book was Denzel Washington protecting in the 2010 movie?

A.  4:  The Book Of Eli. You also get a point if you said The Bible.

.

.

Q.  5:  What is both unusual and famous about the restaurant in Volterra, Italy called  “Fortezza Medicea”?

A.  5:  “Fortezza Medicea” is a maximum security prison – the cooks and waiters are all doing  sentences of at least seven years.

.

.

Q.  6:  In which city is the music recording company Motown based?

A.  6:  Detroit.

.

.

Q.  7:  The official country retreat of the President of the USA, Camp David is in which mountains?

A.  7:  Appalachians.

.

.

Q.  8:  Where did the Incas originate?

A.  8:  Peru.

.

.

Q.  9:  What was the name of the Cuban President over thrown by Fidel Castro in 1959?

A.  9:  General Batista.

.

.

Q. 10:  Although the United States has Roswell and Area 51, and Hollywood has pushed out a unending stream of movies based on them, the government does not officially recognize the existence of UFOs. However three well known countries do formally recognize the existence of UFOs, can you name them? (A point for each and a bonus point if you can name all three.)

A. 10:  France, Italy and Chile have all formally recognized the existence of UFOs.

.

.

Q. 11:  Who was coming to dinner with Spencer Tracy and Katherine Hepburn in 1967?

A. 11:  Sidney Poitier.

.

.

Q. 12:  Who was dubbed “Lenin’s left leg” during the early stages of Russia’s Marxist movement? 

A. 12:  Joseph Stalin.

.

.

Q. 13:  In which US city was the first skyscraper built in 1883?

A. 13:  Chicago.

.

.

Q. 14:  A double question with multiple points. The US State Department currently recognizes 194 different countries in the world, but how many take up approximately half of Earth’s land area?

HINT: It is a relatively small number of the 194 total and there is a bonus point for each of them that you can name.

A. 14:  Seven countries take half of the Earth’s land area and they are Russia, Canada, USA, China, Australia, Brazil and Argentina.

.

.

Q. 15:  What phrase is the unlikely link between Barbara Streisand and Bugs Bunny?

A. 15:  “What’s up, Doc?” is Bugs’ catchphrase and the name of a 1972 comedy/romance movie starring Barbara Streisand and Ryan O’Neill.

.

.

Q. 16:  What is the only state in the Middle East in which there is no desert?

A. 16:  Lebanon.

.

.

Q. 17:  What former Soviet state is currently experiencing massive civil unrest and upheaval?

A. 17:  The Ukraine.

.

.

Q. 18:  Which river has the largest delta?

A. 18:  The River Ganges.

.

.

Q. 19:  Whoopie Goldberg played one in a movie and Patricia Arquette played another in a television series, what were they? (And bonus points if you can name the movie and the tv series.)

A. 19:  They played ‘mediums’, Whoopie Goldberg in the movie ‘Ghost’ and Patricia Arquette in the hit tv series ‘Medium’.

.

.

Q. 20:  Which movie other than ‘The Bodyguard’ featured the song “I Will Always Love You”?

A. 20:  ‘The Best Little Whorehouse In Texas’, a movie starring Dolly Parton who wrote the song.

.

.

============================================

.

Another Week, Another Quiz!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Hi, and welcome to another week and to start it off, another quiz.

The usual selection of random questions to test your knowledge.

And, as usual, if you get stuck you can find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please, NO cheating!

Enjoy and good luck.

.

Quiz_button 02

.

Q.  1:  This one is the name of a famous city and also the man who ran away with Helen?

.

.

Q.  2:  What is the highest mountain in Africa?

.

.

Q.  3:  On which river does the city of Vienna stand?

.

.

Q.  4:  Who was the Empress of India in 1876?

.

.

Q.  5:  In which South American country did the ‘bossa nova’ originate?

.

.

Q.  6:  The so-called “Pastry war” of 1838 was fought between which two nations?

.

.

Q.  7:  Which capital city features in the name of a movie starring Sabu and based on the Arabian Nights?

.

.

Q.  8:  What started in a bakery in Pudding Lane in 1666?

.

.

Q.  9:  To which country does the island of Madeira belong?

.

.

Q. 10:  It’s almost time for the Hollywood Academy Awards again, but who won the Academy Award for best actress two years in a row in 1967 and 1968? (Bonus points if you can also name the movies.)

.

.

Q. 11:  How old was Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart when he died in 1791?

.

.

Q. 12:  What U.S. President committed an unpardonable sin by kissing Britain’s Queen Mother on the lips?

.

.

Q. 13:  On which small island did the USA first test their H bomb in 1954?

.

.

Q. 14:  Most people have heard of the phrase “Crossing the Rubicon” meaning to pass a point of no return, but who was the source of the phrase when he crossed the Rubicon and who was his opponent? (A point for each.)

.

.

Q. 15:  What make of car did Lenin and Stalin have one of that Brezhnev had three of?

.

.

Q. 16:  Which country seceded from Colombia in 1903?

.

.

Q. 17:  Which famous movie title is the Mexican name for the river known in the USA as ‘Rio Grande’?

.

.

Q. 18:  in 1984 who were Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd and Harold Ramis?

.

.

Q. 19:  What mythological creature did Britain’s King George V have tattooed on his right arm?

.

.

Q. 20:  Versions of this popular song have been recorded by Julie Covington, Madonna, Sarah Brighman, Elaine Paige, Sinead O’Connor, Susan Erens and The Carpenters, among others, what is it?

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

ANSWERS

.

Q.  1:  This one is the name of a famous city and also the man who ran away with Helen?

A.  1:  Paris.

.

.

Q.  2:  What is the highest mountain in Africa?

A.  2:  Mt. Kilimanjaro.

.

.

Q.  3:  On which river does the city of Vienna stand?

A.  3:  The River Danube.

.

.

Q.  4:  Who was the Empress of India in 1876?

A.  4:  Britain’s Queen Victoria.

.

.

Q.  5:  In which South American country did the ‘bossa nova’ originate?

A.  5:  Brazil.

.

.

Q.  6:  The so-called “Pastry war” of 1838 was fought between which two nations?

A.  6:  Mexico and France.

.

.

Q.  7:  Which capital city features in the name of a movie starring Sabu and based on the Arabian Nights?

A.  7:  Baghdad, the name of the movie is “The Thief of Baghdad”.

.

.

Q.  8:  What started in a bakery in Pudding Lane in 1666?

A.  8:  The great fire of London.

.

.

Q.  9:  To which country does the island of Madeira belong?

A.  9:  Portugal.

.

.

Q. 10:  It’s almost time for the Hollywood Academy Awards again, but who won the Academy Award for best actress two years in a row in 1967 and 1968? (Bonus points if you can also name the movies.)

A. 10:  Katharine Hepburn, in 1967 for ‘Guess Who’s Coming To Dinner’ and in 1968 for ‘The Lion In Winter’.

.

.

Q. 11:  How old was Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart when he died in 1791?

A. 11:  Only 35 years old.

.

.

Q. 12:  What U.S. President committed an unpardonable sin by kissing Britain’s Queen Mother on the lips?

A. 12:  President Jimmy Carter.

.

.

Q. 13:  On which small island did the USA first test their H bomb in 1954?

A. 13:  Bikini.

.

.

Q. 14:  Most people have heard of the phrase “Crossing the Rubicon” meaning to pass a point of no return, but who was the source of the phrase when he crossed the Rubicon and who was his opponent? (A point for each.)

A. 14:  The phrase originated when Julius Caesar crossed the River Rubicon to fight Pompey.

.

.

Q. 15:  What make of car did Lenin and Stalin have one of that Brezhnev had three of?

A. 15:  Rolls Royce.

.

.

Q. 16:  Which country seceded from Colombia in 1903?

A. 16:  Panama.

.

.

Q. 17:  Which famous movie title is the Mexican name for the river known in the USA as ‘Rio Grande’?

A. 17: Rio Bravo

.

.

Q. 18:  in 1984 who were Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd and Harold Ramis?

A. 18:  They were the ‘Ghostbusters’, a group of misfit parapsychologists Peter Venkman (Bill Murray), Raymond Stantz (Dan Aykroyd), and Egon Spengler (Harold Ramis).

.

.

Q. 19:  What mythological creature did Britain’s King George V have tattooed on his right arm?

A. 19:  A Dragon.

.

.

Q. 20:  Versions of this popular song have been recorded by Julie Covington, Madonna, Sarah Brighman, Elaine Paige, Sinead O’Connor, Susan Erens and The Carpenters, among others, what is it?

A. 20:  “Don’t Cry For Me, Argentina”

.

.

===============================================

.

A Festive Bumper Edition Of Our Monday Quiz!

 “Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Yes folks, this being Christmas week we have a bumper Christmassy edition of the quiz.

All the questions have a Christmas theme and there are plenty of them this week, so this quiz should keep you going over the holidays.

As usual, if you get stuck, you can find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but NO cheating please!

Merry Christmas and enjoy.

.

Christmas Quiz

.

Q.  1:  If you were born on Christmas day, what would be your Zodiac sign?

.

.

Q.  2:  In which century was Christmas first celebrated?

.

.

Q.  3:  What significance is holly in celebrating Christmas?

.

.

Q.  4:  In the familiar song ‘The 12 Days of Christmas’, what is the gift on the fourth day?

.

.

Q.  5:  In the 1998 movie what actor whilst out Christmas shopping suddenly finds himself an “Enemy of the State”?

.

.

Q.  6:  Who discovered Christmas Island in 1777?

.

.

Q.  7:  Who wrote the song “I’m dreaming of a white Christmas”?

.

.

Q.  8:  Plus or minus one year, how long does it take a Scotch Pine Christmas tree to reach a typical retail height of 6 to 7 feet?

.

.

Q.  9:  One of the most popular floral gifts at Christmas is the Poinsetta, but what country did Poinsettias originally come from?

.

.

Q. 10:  At the end of the war in Vietnam, when Saigon fell, the signal for all Americans to evacuate was what song by Bing Crosby being played on the radio?

.

.

Q. 11:  What was Scrooge’s business partner called?

.

.

Q. 12:  When exactly is ‘The Twelfth Night’?

.

.

Q. 13:  Why was Boxing Day so named?

.

.

Q. 14:  Who composed the music for the festive season ballet ‘The Nutcracker’?

.

.

Q. 15:  Which Italian cake, popular at Christmas, belongs to Tony?

.

.

Q. 16:  What job was first taken by James Edgar in 1890?

.

.

Q. 17:  In which celebrated movie does James Stewart attempt suicide one Christmas?

.

.

Q. 18:  The Bible doesn’t say when Jesus was born. Pope Julius I made this decision in which year? 

            a) 50 AD      b) 350 AD      c) 750 AD      d) 1250 AD

.

.

Q. 19:  Mr and Mrs Hilton had a little boy who was born on Christmas Day 1887, and went on to found of one of the world’s largest Hotel chains, but what was his first name?

.

.

Q. 20:  The names of which two reindeer mean ‘Thunder’ and ‘Lightning’?

.

.

Q.  21:  What is the name of the fruit sauce which is a traditional accompaniment to the Christmas Turkey?

.

.

Q.  22:  The American ad writer Robert L. May invented which colorful Christmas character in 1939?

.

.

Q.  23:  The German Christmas song ‘Tannebaum’ is translated into English as what?

.

.

Q.  24:  What does the word ‘Bethlehem’ mean?

.

.

Q.  25:  Before Pope Julius I decided that December 25th was the day Jesus was born, on which day did early Christians celebrate the birth of Jesus?  

.

.

Q.  26:  Coca Cola made our modern Father Christmas for an advertising campaign, but prior to that, what color robes did he wear?

.

.

Q.  27:  Which ‘Christmas’ word means ‘turning of the sun’?

.

.

Q.  28:  Complete the title of each of the following Christmas movies.

            a) Holiday… b) We’re No… c) The Bells of… d) It’s A Wonderful…

.

.

Q.  29:  What was the name of Scrooge’s clerk in a Christmas Carol?

.

.

Q. 30:  Advent candles are a popular Christmas tradition in many cultures. What does the word advent mean?

.

.

Q. 31:  Which nickname for Hollywood sounds Christmassy?

.

.

Q. 32:  Which pudding with a misleading name was banned by English Puritans because it was deemed to be ‘sinfully rich’?

.

.

Q. 33:  The Greek word for ‘Messiah’ was ‘Xristos’(Christ). What do all of these words mean translated?

.

.

Q. 34:  In the movie ‘Die Hard 2’, which airport did the terrorist take over on Christmas Eve?

.

.

Q. 35:  Many people claim that the first unofficial football (soccer) international between Germany and a Scotland-England side was played on a Christmas Day. The pitch or playing field was found between what?

.

.

Q. 36:  In which country does an ugly old witch named ‘Bafana’ deliver presents on the 6th of December?

           a) Australia      b) Austria      c) Italy       d) Mexico

.

.

Q. 37:  There are two ‘Christmas islands’, in which oceans are they located?

.

.

Q. 38:  In which city is Kevin left ‘Home Alone’ at Christmas? (the first Home Alone)

.

.

Q. 39:  “Good King Wenceslas looked out on the feast of Stephan”.  What is the name of the country where Wenceslas was king? (Will accept either the ‘old’ or ‘modern’ name of the country.)

.

.

Q. 40:  Which Christmas tradition, said to have originated in Germany, was banned in the Soviet Union until 1935?

.

Q.  41:  In which country is St. Nick called ‘Sinterklaas’?

.

.

Q.  42:  Which Christmas gift of the very highest quality, also known as ‘Oil of Lebanon’, comes from Oman?

.

.
Q.  43:  Why was December 25th chosen as Christmas Day?

.

.

Q.  44:  Who said, “You’ll want all day tomorrow, I suppose “?

.

.

Q.  45:  Which popular poem did Clement Clark Moore write for his six children in 1822?

.

.

Q.  46:  The following all mean ‘Merry Christmas’ in which language? (A point for each!)

             a) Hyvaa joulua    b) sung tan chuk ha    c) froehliche weihnacten   

             d) mele kalikimaka    e) god jul    f) boas festas    g) kala christouyenna

.

.

Q.  47:  Superstition dictates that when making mince pies for Christmas one should always stir in which direction?

.

.

Q.  48:  Which Christmas tradition did the very busy Sir Henry Cole introduce in 1843?

.

.

Q.  49:  The Christmas movie ‘Miracle on 34th Street’ has been remade many times. Who won a best supporting actor Oscar for the role of Kris Kringle in the original 1947 movie and which two time Oscar winner played Kris in the 1994 remake?

.

.

Q. 50:  Which song begins with “Are you hanging up your stocking on the wall”?

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

ANSWERS

.

Q.  1:  If you were born on Christmas day, what would be your Zodiac sign?

A.  1:  Capricorn.

.

.

Q.  2:  In which century was Christmas first celebrated?

A.  2:  In the 4th century.

.

.

Q.  3:  What significance is holly in celebrating Christmas?

A.  3:  The early church banned mistletoe, so holly was substituted.

.

.

Q.  4:  In the familiar song ‘The 12 Days of Christmas’, what is the gift on the fourth day?

A.  4:  4 Calling Birds.

.

.

Q.  5:  In the 1998 movie what actor whilst out Christmas shopping suddenly finds himself an “Enemy of the State”?

A.  5:  Will Smith

.

.

Q.  6:  Who discovered Christmas Island in 1777?

A.  6:  Captain Cook.

.

.

Q.  7:  Who wrote the song “I’m dreaming of a white Christmas”?

A.  7:  Irving Berlin.

.

.

Q.  8:  Plus or minus one year, how long does it take a Scotch Pine Christmas tree to reach a typical retail height of 6 to 7 feet?

A.  8:  7 years.

.

.

Q.  9:  One of the most popular floral gifts at Christmas is the Poinsetta, but what country did Poinsettias originally come from?

A.  9:  Mexico.

.

.

Q. 10:  At the end of the war in Vietnam, when Saigon fell, the signal for all Americans to evacuate was what song by Bing Crosby being played on the radio?

A. 10:  White Christmas.

.

.

Q. 11:  What was Scrooge’s business partner called?

A. 11:  Jacob Marley.

.

.

Q. 12:  When exactly is ‘The Twelfth Night’?

A. 12:  The evening of the 5th of January.

.

.

Q. 13:  Why was Boxing Day so named?

A. 13:  After the custom of giving Christmas Boxes/Tips to workmen/tradesmen.

.

.

Q. 14:  Who composed the music for the festive season ballet ‘The Nutcracker’?

A. 14:  Tchaikovsky.

.

.

Q. 15:  Which Italian cake, popular at Christmas, belongs to Tony?

A. 15:  Panettone. (Anthony or Tone’s bread).

.

.

Q. 16:  What job was first taken by James Edgar in 1890?

A. 16:  He was the first department store Santa.

.

.

Q. 17:  In which celebrated movie does James Stewart attempt suicide one Christmas?

A. 17:  It’s A Wonderful Life.

.

.

Q. 18:  The Bible doesn’t say when Jesus was born. Pope Julius I made this decision in which year? 

            a) 50 AD      b) 350 AD      c) 750 AD      d) 1250 AD

A. 18:  Answer b) 350 AD.

.

.

Q. 19:  Mr and Mrs Hilton had a little boy who was born on Christmas Day 1887, and went on to found of one of the world’s largest Hotel chains, but what was his first name?

A. 19:  Conrad.

.

.

Q. 20:  The names of which two reindeer mean ‘Thunder’ and ‘Lightning’?

A. 20:  Donner and Blitzen.

.

.

Q.  21:  What is the name of the fruit sauce which is a traditional accompaniment to the Christmas Turkey?

A.  21:  Cranberry.

.

.

Q.  22:  The American ad writer Robert L. May invented which colorful Christmas character in 1939?

A.  22:  Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer.

.

.

Q.  23:  The German Christmas song ‘Tannebaum’ is translated into English as what?

A.  23:  Christmas Tree.

.

.

Q.  24:  What does the word ‘Bethlehem’ mean?

A.  24:   House of meat (Arabic) or House of bread (Hebraic)

.

.

Q.  25:  Before Pope Julius I decided that December 25th was the day Jesus was born, on which day did early Christians celebrate the birth of Jesus?  

A.  25:  The 6th of January or feast of the epiphany. (Greek for appearance or revelation).

.

.

Q.  26:  Coca Cola made our modern Father Christmas for an advertising campaign, but prior to that, what color robes did he wear?

A.  26:  Green. (As a sign of the returning Spring.)

.

.

Q.  27:  Which ‘Christmas’ word means ‘turning of the sun’?

A.  27:  Yuletide (Yule means wheel in old Norse language).

.

.

Q.  28:  Complete the title of each of the following Christmas movies.

            a) Holiday… b) We’re No… c) The Bells of… d) It’s A Wonderful…

A.  28:  a) …Inn        b) …Angels     c) …St. Marys     d) …Life

.

.

Q.  29:  What was the name of Scrooge’s clerk in a Christmas Carol?

A.  29:  Bob Cratchit.

.

.

Q. 30:  Advent candles are a popular Christmas tradition in many cultures. What does the word advent mean?

A. 30:  Arrival.

.

.

Q. 31:  Which nickname for Hollywood sounds Christmassy?

A. 31:  Tinseltown.

.

.

Q. 32:  Which pudding with a misleading name was banned by English Puritans because it was deemed to be ‘sinfully rich’?

A. 32:  Plum pudding. (Incidentally, there are no plums in plum pudding, just sugar, raisons, suet, flour and various spices boiled in a bag till ‘plum’)

.

.

Q. 33:  The Greek word for ‘Messiah’ was ‘Xristos’(Christ). What do all of these words mean translated?

A. 33:  The ‘annointed’ one.

.

.

Q. 34:  In the movie ‘Die Hard 2’, which airport did the terrorist take over on Christmas Eve?

A. 34:  Dulles International Airport (Washington DC).

.

.

Q. 35:  Many people claim that the first unofficial football (soccer) international between Germany and a Scotland-England side was played on a Christmas Day. The pitch or playing field was found between what?

A. 35:  Between the trenches in no mans land, Christmas 1914.  (No match report is available but it seems the Germans won 3-2.)

.

.

Q. 36:  In which country does an ugly old witch named ‘Bafana’ deliver presents on the 6th of December?

           a) Australia      b) Austria      c) Italy       d) Mexico

A. 36:  Answer c) Italy. 

.

.

Q. 37:  There are two ‘Christmas islands’, in which oceans are they located?

A. 37:  The Pacific and Indian oceans.

.

.

Q. 38:  In which city is Kevin left ‘Home Alone’ at Christmas? (the first Home Alone)

A. 38:  Chicago.

.

.

Q. 39:  “Good King Wenceslas looked out on the feast of Stephan”.  What is the name of the country where Wenceslas was king? (Will accept either the ‘old’ or ‘modern’ name of the country.)

A. 39:  Bohemia, now known as the Czech Republic.

.

.

Q. 40:  Which Christmas tradition, said to have originated in Germany, was banned in the Soviet Union until 1935?

A. 40:  Christmas trees.

.

.

Q.  41:  In which country is St. Nick called ‘Sinterklaas’?

A.  41:  Holland.

.

.

Q.  42:  Which Christmas gift of the very highest quality, also known as ‘Oil of Lebanon’, comes from Oman?

A.  42:  Frankincense.

.

.
Q.  43:  Why was December 25th chosen as Christmas Day?

A.  43:  To compete with a pagan celebration.

.

.

Q.  44:  Who said, “You’ll want all day tomorrow, I suppose “?

A.  44:  Scrooge to Bob Cratchit in Dicken’s ‘A Christmas Carol’.

.

.

Q.  45:  Which popular poem did Clement Clark Moore write for his six children in 1822?

A.  45:  A visit from St. Nicholas (The night before Christmas) “It twas the night before Christmas when all through the house……”

.

.

Q.  46:  The following all mean ‘Merry Christmas’ in which language? (A point for each!)

             a) Hyvaa joulua    b) sung tan chuk ha    c) froehliche weihnacten   

             d) mele kalikimaka    e) god jul    f) boas festas    g) kala christouyenna

A.  46:  Answers   a) Finnish    b) Korean    c) German    d) Hawaiian    e) Norwegian

             f) Portugese    and,    g) Greek

.

.

Q.  47:  Superstition dictates that when making mince pies for Christmas one should always stir in which direction?

A.  47:  In a clockwise direction.

.

.

Q.  48:  Which Christmas tradition did the very busy Sir Henry Cole introduce in 1843?

A.  48:  The sending of Christmas wishes on mass produced Christmas cards.  The first cards depicted a family toasting an absent friend with the words “Merry Christmas and a happy New Year to you”.

.

.

Q.  49:  The Christmas movie ‘Miracle on 34th Street’ has been remade many times. Who won a best supporting actor Oscar for the role of Kris Kringle in the original 1947 movie and which two time Oscar winner played Kris in the 1994 remake?

A.  49:  Edmund Gwenn and Richard Attenborough.

.

.

Q. 50:  Which song begins with “Are you hanging up your stocking on the wall”?

A. 50:  Slade’s Merry Christmas Everybody.

.

.

==================================

.

Is It Just Me, Or Are There Any Other Anagrams Of Em?

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

No, it’s not just me.

Loads of people like puns and pun day.

Here’s another one.

Enjoy!

.

rofl

.

If you’re fishing for compliments

it’s best to use allure.

fishing for compliments

.

.

I just pitched a tent in the garden.

Surprised myself how far I could throw it.

tent--colored-cartoon-illustration

.

.

I was telling a friend that I made a

ventriloquist’s dummy out of some old carpet.

“Any good?” he queried.

“Nah, it’s ruggish,” I replied.

ventriloquist's dummy

.

.

I was stunned to find my Taser gun was still switched on.

Taser-Gun

.

.

I shouldn’t have dumped my girlfriend after

overhearing her making fun of my poor endowment.

Turned out she was a financial adviser

endowment

.

.

I’ve been using X and Y chromosomes in my

adverts recently since, after all, sex cells…

X and Y chromosomes

.

.

Last night I looked up at the stars and thought:

“It’s crap being a dwarf in Hollywood.”

grumpy dwarf

.

.

When I was young, I used to think CCTV was

a very positive Spanish television channel.

cctv4

.

.

I’ve got an injured extraterrestrial in my shed.

He’s missing an eye.

I’ve called him Alen.

one eyed alien

.

.

My dog’s been sitting in the corner, feeling

sorry for himself, for three days.

I knew I shouldn’t have bought a Pitiful Terrier

scared-dog

.

.

I saw a headline in the local paper:

“Huge Grant Saves Derelict Theatre”.

I thought: That was nice of him.

hugh grant

.

.

I’m a doctor. My wife’s a judge.

She knows how to try my patients.

judge-with-gavel

.

.

My missus says she is leaving me because of my obsession with pool.

“Come on love”, I said. “Give me a break”.

pool break

.

.

I thought I’d dug up an unknown species

of dinosaur in my back garden.

Excitedly I phoned the Natural History Museum,

but it turned out to be a fossil arm.

fossil

.

.

I’ve taken thousands of showers over the years.

Never been caught once.

shower-cartoon

.

.

A friend asked me if I knew any words that could describe relief.

I told him I know a phew

phew

.

.

I bought a new thesaurus today.

It’s nothing to write house about.

thesaurus

.

.

I went for a colonic irrigation today,

then got hit with a huge $659 bill.

It really cleaned me out.

colonic-irrigation

.

.

I phoned up the incontinence hotline today and

the lady on the other end asked where I’m ringing from.

I said, “From the waist down.”

incontinence hot line

.

.

What do Mexican Robots Eat?

Silicon-Carne

.

======================================

.

Start The Week With A Quiz!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Yes, another quiz. A selection of twenty random questions to test your knowledge.

As usual the answers can be found waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please, NO cheating!

Enjoy and good luck.

.

quiz 09

.

Q.  1:  What captain did Fletcher Christian lead a mutiny against near Tahiti in 1789?

.

.

Q.  2:  The ‘Andrea Gail’ is an ill-fated ship in which Hollywood movie? 

.

.

Q.  3:  Which anti-social television character does not like pickles?

.

.

Q.  4:  What two countries were formed in 1993 as a result of what is known as the  ‘Velvet Divorce’?

.

.

Q.  5:  Barnes Wallis is credited as the inventor of which military equipment?

.

.

Q.  6:  Which three primary colors make up a TV picture?

.

.

Q.  7:  The 18th Amendment introduced Prohibition in the United States, but which amendment abolished it?

.

.

Q.  8:  How long did the Berlin Wall stand?

.

.

Q.  9:  What famous leader was killed on the Ides of March?

.

.

Q. 10:  In which American town or city was the TV series ‘Hill Street Blues’ set?

.

.

Q. 11:  Which survival device for people travelling in aircraft was first successfully used in 1912?

.

.

Q. 12:  In which movie did Ben Kingsley play both the Vice President and President of the United States of America?

.

.

Q. 13:  To within 5 years, what year saw slavery officially ended in the USA? 

.

.

Q. 14:  In which battle did Sitting Bull defeat General Custer?

.

.

Q. 15:  Which Parisian landmark was built to mark the World Exhibition taking place in the City?

.

.

Q. 16:  Howard Hughes was obsessed with which Rock Hudson movie?

.

.

Q. 17:  Which legendary organization did King Louis Philippe of France found?

.

.

Q. 18:  Who played the part of ‘Rowdy Yates’ in ‘Rawhide’?

.

.

Q. 19:  Which US President is the only one to have been divorced?

.

.

Q. 20:  What is the link between the astronauts Alan Shephard, Virgil Grissom, John Glenn, Scott Carpenter and Gordon Cooper?

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

ANSWERS

.

Q.  1:  What captain did Fletcher Christian lead a mutiny against near Tahiti in 1789?

A.  1:  William Bligh

.

. 

Q.  2:  The ‘Andrea Gail’ is an ill-fated ship in which Hollywood movie? 

A.  2:  The Perfect Storm

.

. 

Q.  3:  Which anti-social television character does not like pickles?

A.  3:  Dr Gregory House

.

. 

Q.  4:  What two countries were formed in 1993 as a result of what is known as the ‘Velvet Divorce’?

A.  4:  The Czech Republic and Slovakia

.

. 

Q.  5:  Barnes Wallis is credited as the inventor of which military equipment?

A.  5:  The bouncing bomb

.

. 

Q.  6:  Which three primary colors make up a TV picture?

A.  6:  Red green and blue

.

. 

Q.  7:  The 18th Amendment introduced Prohibition in the United States, but which amendment abolished it?

A.  7:  21st Amendment

.

. 

Q.  8:  How long did the Berlin Wall stand?

A.  8:  28 years

.

. 

Q.  9:  What famous leader was killed on the Ides of March?

A.  9:  Julius Caesar

.

. 

Q. 10:  In which American town or city was the TV series ‘Hill Street Blues’ set?

A. 10:  New York

.

. 

Q. 11:  Which survival device for people travelling in aircraft was first successfully used in 1912?

A. 11:  The Parachute

.

. 

Q. 12:  In which movie did Ben Kingsley play both the Vice President and President of the United States of America?

A. 12:  Dave

.

. 

Q. 13:  To within 5 years, what year saw slavery officially ended in the USA? 

A. 13:  1863

.

. 

Q. 14:  In which battle did Sitting Bull defeat General Custer?

A. 14:  Battle Of The Little Bighorn

.

. 

Q. 15:  Which Parisian landmark was built to mark the World Exhibition taking place in the City?

A. 15:  The Eiffel Tower

.

. 

Q. 16:  Howard Hughes was obsessed with which Rock Hudson movie?

A. 16:  Ice Station Zebra

.

. 

Q. 17:  Which legendary organization did King Louis Philippe of France found?

A. 17:  The French Foreign Legion

.

. 

Q. 18:  Who played the part of ‘Rowdy Yates’ in ‘Rawhide’?

A. 18:  Clint Eastwood

.

. 

Q. 19:  Which US President is the only one to have been divorced?

A. 19:  Ronald Reagan

.

. 

Q. 20:  What is the link between the astronauts Alan Shephard, Virgil Grissom, John Glenn, Scott Carpenter and Gordon Cooper?

A. 20:  Their first names were used for the Thunderbirds

.

.

=======================================

.