A Mish Mash Quiz Today.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Welcome to today’s quiz on the fasab blog.

Another challenging selection of questions for you.

And if you get stuck you can find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating.

Enjoy and good luck.

.

quiz 05

.

Q.  1.  M*A*S*H was a famous book, movie and TV series, but what do the letters M A S H stand for?

.

.

Q.  2. Wind transports approximately how many millions of tonnes of dust from the Sahara to the Amazon every year?

          a) 4 million tonnes        b) 40 million tonnes        c) 400 million tonnes

.

.

Q.  3.  What city is known as ‘The City Of Tigers’ ? (HINT: it is not in Asia.)

.

.

Q.  4.  ‘Ring of Bright Water’ is a book about which creatures?

.

.

Q.  5.  This one is the name of a rich fruit cake decorated with almonds, a town in Scotland, and the last name of a comic Australian movie character. What is it?

.

.

Q.  6.  In which country is the legendary city of Timbuktu? (If you have been following the TV series American Odyssey you’ll know this one.)

.

.

Q.  7.  A multi-point question. What currencies are used in the following countries?

           a) USA          b) Britain          c) Japan           d) Europe          e) China

.

.

Q.  8.  What percentage of internet users quit waiting for a video to load after 10 seconds?

            a) 10%         b) 20%         c) 30%         d) 40%         e) 50%          f) 60%

.

.

Q.  9.  What were the first names of the four main characters of the long running and highly successful TV series ‘The Golden Girls’ ? (Bonus points if you can also correctly name the actresses who played them.)

.

.

Q. 10.  In 1929, US Army Air Corps Lieutenant General John MacCready asked Bausch & Lomb, a New York-based medical equipment manufacturer, to create aviation sunglasses that would ban the sun rays and reduce the headaches and nausea experienced by his pilots. What name were they given?

.

.

Q. 11.  “The devil on two sticks” is a former name for which juggling-like game?

.

.

Q. 12.  What are the four largest countries on Earth by area? (A point for each you name correctly and a bonus point if you get them in the correct order, starting with the largest.)

.

.

Q. 13.  What is the painting, ‘La Gioconda’, more usually known as?

.

.

Q. 14.  What is the name of the traditional Irish potato and cabbage dish?

.

.

Q. 15.  What is the name of John Lennon’s widow?

.

.

Q. 16.  With whom is the fictional character ‘Alfred Pennyworth’ associated?

.

.

Q. 17.  Who is the largest American retailer of lingerie?

.

.

Q. 18.  In the Bible what are the names of the first and last books of the New Testament?

.

.

Q. 19.  What was the name of the flamboyant and controversial Australian actor who starred in many movies during the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s and played characters like ‘Robin Hood’ and ‘George Custer’?

.

.

Q. 20.  What was the name of the group that Paul McCartney went on to form in 1970 after The Beatles split up?

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

ANSWERS

.

Q.  1.  M*A*S*H was a famous book, movie and TV series, but what do the latters M A S H stand for?

A.  1.  Mobile Army Surgical Hospital.

.

.

Q.  2. Wind transports approximately how many millions of tonnes of dust from the Sahara to the Amazon every year?

          a) 4 million tonnes          b) 40 million tonnes          c) 400 million tonnes

A.  2. The correct answer is b) 40 million tonnes.

.

.

Q.  3.  What city is known as ‘The City Of Tigers’ ? (HINT: it is not in Asia.)

A.  3.  It’s Oslo, Norway. (Apparently because the city was referred to as ‘Tigerstaden’ (the City of Tigers) by the author Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson around 1870, due to his perception of the city as a cold and dangerous place.

.

.

Q.  4.  ‘Ring of Bright Water’ is a book about which creatures?

A.  4.  Otters.

.

.

Q.  5.  This one is the name of a rich fruit cake decorated with almonds, a town in Scotland, and the last name of  a comic Australian movie character. What is it?

A.  5.  It is ‘Dundee’.

.

.

Q.  6.  In which country is the legendary city of Timbuktu? (If you have been following the TV series American Odyssey you’ll know this one.)

A.  6.  Mali, Africa.

.

.

Q.  7.  A multi-point question. What currencies are used in the following countries?

         a) USA       b) Britain       c) Japan       d) Europe       e) China

A.  7.  a) Dollar      b) Pound        c) Yen          d) Euro         e) Yuan Renminbi

.

.

Q.  8.  What percentage of internet users quit waiting for a video to load after 10 seconds?

            a) 10%         b) 20%         c) 30%         d) 40%         e) 50%          f) 60%

A.  8.  The correct answer is e) 50%.

.

.

Q.  9.  What were the first names of the four main characters of the long running and highly successful TV series ‘The Golden Girls’ ? (Bonus points if you can also correctly name the actresses who played them.)

A.  9.  They were Dorothy Zbornak (played by Bea Arthur); Rose Nylund (played by Betty White); Blanche Devereaux (played by Rue McClanahan); and Sophia Petrillo (played by Estelle Getty).

.

.

Q. 10.  In 1929, US Army Air Corps Lieutenant General John MacCready asked Bausch & Lomb, a New York-based medical equipment manufacturer, to create aviation sunglasses that would ban the sun rays and reduce the headaches and nausea experienced by his pilots. What name were they given?

A. 10.  They were called Ray Ban.

.

.

Q. 11.  “The devil on two sticks” is a former name for which juggling-like game?

A. 11.  Diabolo.

.

.

Q. 12.  What are the four largest countries on Earth by area? (A point for each you name correctly and a bonus point if you get them in the correct order, starting with the largest.)

A. 12.  1)  Russia         2)  Canada          3)  United States          4) PR China

.

.

Q. 13.  What is the painting, ‘La Gioconda’, more usually known as?

A. 13.  The Mona Lisa.

.

.

Q. 14.  What is the name of the traditional Irish potato and cabbage dish?

A. 14.  Colcannon.

.

.

Q. 15.  What is the name of John Lennon’s widow?

A. 15.  Yoko Ono.

.

.

Q. 16.  With whom is the fictional character ‘Alfred Pennyworth’ associated?

A. 16.  He is butler to Bruce Wayne, aka Batman.

.

.

Q. 17.  Who is the largest American retailer of lingerie?

A. 17.  Victoria’s Secret.

.

.

Q. 18.  In the Bible what are the names of the first and last books of the New Testament?

A. 18.  They are the book of Matthew and the book of Revelation.

.

.

Q. 19.  What was the name of the flamboyant and controversial Australian actor who starred in many movies during the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s and played characters like ‘Robin Hood’ and ‘George Custer’?

A. 19.  He was Errol Flynn.

.

.

Q. 20.  What was the name of the group that Paul McCartney went on to form in 1970 after The Beatles split up?

A. 20.  It was called ‘Wings’, have a taste….

.

.

==============================

.

November’s Quizzes Begin Here.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

First Monday of November and the first quiz of November.

It may be a different month but the format remains the same. Twenty random questions to test you general knowledge.

And as usual, if you get stuck, you can find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating!

Enjoy and good luck.

.

quiz 05

.

Q.  1:  How are you related to the sister-in-law of your dad’s only brother?

.

.

Q.  2:  There has been a TV series and a movie named “The Equalizer”, which actors played the leading characters in each?

.

.

Q.  3:  What are the names the capital city of New Zealand and its most populous city and on which island are they situated? (A point for each correct answer.)

.

.

Q.  4:  If a doctor gave you 5 pills and asked you to take 1 pill every 30 minutes, how many hours would it take you to consume all the pills?

.

.

Q.  5:  In what country was the game ‘Chinese Checkers’ (or ‘Chinese Chequers’) invented?

.

.

Q.  6:  What are the three main types of Whiskey, defined by how they are distilled?

.

.

Q.  7:  Where were the first modern Olympic Games held?

.

.

Q.  8:  If 5/8 of the children in a school are boys and the school consists of 2400 students, how many girls are there?

.

.

Q.  9:  How many meters, yards or feet are there in a ‘nautical mile’?

.

.

Q. 10:  ‘Marble’ is a form of which type of rock?

.

.

Q. 11:  Where would you find a chicken’s ‘oysters’?

.

.

Q. 12:  In what US city was the original TV series ‘NCIS’ based, and what are the locations for the two spin-off series? (A point for each correct answer.)

.

.

Q. 13:  A related question to the previous one, what do the letters ‘NCIS’ stand for?

.

.

Q. 14:  Approximately what proportion of the continental land mass is located in the Northern Hemisphere?

.

.

Q. 15:  Which chemical element has the highest melting point at normal pressure?

.

.

Q. 16:  What artist was famous for his paintings of matchstick men?

.

.

Q. 17:  What is the study of birds called?

.

.

Q. 18:  What metal, often used by sculptors, is an alloy of copper and tin?

.

.

Q. 19:  What is produced by the rapid expansion of atmospheric gases suddenly heated by lightning?

.

.

Q. 20:  Finally one for all you vintage gamers, where did you find cherry strawberry orange apple grape bird?

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

ANSWERS

.

Q.  1:  How are you related to the sister-in-law of your dad’s only brother?

A.  1:  She’s your mom.

.

.

Q.  2:  There has been a TV series and a movie named “The Equalizer”, which actors played the leading characters in each?

A.  2:  Edward Woodward in the TV series and Denzil Washington in the recent movie.

.

.

Q.  3:  What are the names the capital city of New Zealand and its most populous city and on which island are they situated? (A point for each correct answer.)

A.  3:  Wellington is the capital of New Zealand and Auckland is its most populous city with approximately 1.4 million inhabitants. Both are situated on the North Island.

.

.

Q.  4:  If a doctor gave you 5 pills and asked you to take 1 pill every 30 minutes, how many hours would it take you to consume all the pills?

A.  4:  2 hours. You took the first pill as soon as the doctor gave them to you.

.

.

Q.  5:  In what country was the game ‘Chinese Checkers’ (or ‘Chinese Chequers’) invented?

A.  5:  Germany (in 1892, called Stern-Halma, a variation of earlier American game Halma.

.

.

Q.  6:  What are the three main types of Whiskey, defined by how they are distilled?

A.  6:  They are ‘Scotch’, ‘Irish’ and ‘Bourbon’.

.

.

Q.  7:  Where were the first modern Olympic Games held?

A.  7:  They were held in Much Wenlock, Shropshire, England in 1850 and annually for a while afterwards, inspiring the Athens Olympiad of 1896 and the Olympic movement. (You get a point if you said ‘England’ and three points if you knew the exact location.)

.

.

Q.  8:  If 5/8 of the children in a school are boys and the school consists of 2400 students, how many girls are there?

A.  8:  900 (If 5/8 of the children in a school are boys, then 3/8 of the children in that school are girls. (5/8 + 3/8 = 1) 3/8 of 2400 = 3/8 * 2400 = 900)

.

.

Q.  9:  How many meters, yards or feet are there in a ‘nautical mile’?

A.  9:  A nautical mile is a unit of distance that is approximately one minute of arc measured along any meridian and by international agreement has been set at 1,852 metres exactly, or approximately 2,025 yards or 6,076 feet.

.

.

Q. 10:  ‘Marble’ is a form of which type of rock?

A. 10:  Limestone.

.

.

Q. 11:  Where would you find a chicken’s ‘oysters’?

A. 11:  Chicken Oysters are two small, round pieces of dark meat on the back of poultry near the thigh. Some regard the “oyster meat” to be the most flavorful and tender part of the bird, while others dislike the taste and texture.

.

.

Q. 12:  In what US city was the original TV series ‘NCIS’ based, and what are the locations for the two spin-off series? (A point for each correct answer.)

A. 12:  The original NCIS TV series was set in Washington DC and the spin-off shows are set in Los Angeles and New Orleans.

.

.

Q. 13:  A related question to the previous one, what do the letters ‘NCIS’ stand for?

A. 13:  They stand for ‘Naval Criminal Investigative Service’.

.

.

Q. 14:  Approximately what proportion of the continental land mass is located in the Northern Hemisphere?

A. 14:  Approximately two-thirds.

.

.

Q. 15:  Which chemical element has the highest melting point at normal pressure?

A. 15:  ‘Tungsten’ is the chemical element with the highest melting point, at 3687 K (3414 °C, 6177 °F)[4] making it excellent for use as filaments in light bulbs. The often-cited carbon does not melt at ambient pressure but sublimes at about 4000 K; a liquid phase only exists above pressures of 10 MPa and estimated 4300–4700 K.

.

.

Q. 16:  What artist was famous for his paintings of matchstick men?

A. 16:  Laurence Stephen Lowry, better known as ‘L.S. Lowry’ (Nov 1st 1887 to Feb 23rd 1976).

.

.

Q. 17:  What is the study of birds called?

A. 17:  The study of birds is called ‘Ornithology’.

.

.

Q. 18:  What metal, often used by sculptors, is an alloy of copper and tin?

A. 18:  Bronze.

.

.

Q. 19:  What is produced by the rapid expansion of atmospheric gases suddenly heated by lightning?

A. 19:  Easier than you thought, it’s ‘thunder’.

.

.

Q. 20:  Finally one for all you vintage gamers, where did you find cherry strawberry orange apple grape bird?

A. 20:  Pac Man. Want to have a go?

http://www.knowledgeadventure.com/games/pac-man/

.

================================================

.

End September With Some Facts.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Indeed, what better way to end the month of September than with another random selection of facts.

I’m sure there are at least a few things in this lot that you didn’t know.

Enjoy.

.

facts 04

.

There are more than 100,000 chemical reactions

happening in your brain every second.

chemical reactions happening in your brain

.

.

The first machine-made chocolate was

produced in Barcelona, Spain, in 1780.

machine-made chocolate

.

.

A blue whale´s tongue alone

can weigh as much as a single adult elephant

which gives you an indication of the size of the former.

blue-whale-tongue-n-elephant

.

.

About 275 million new stars are born everyday.

275 million new stars are born everyday

.

.

Ohio lawyer Clement Vallandigham

managed to shoot himself in a court room in 1871

while demonstrating to a jury how his client’s

alleged murder victim had actually shot himself.

Apparently no one checked the gun.

Clement Vallandigham

.

.

The Chinese language (Mandarin/Cantonese)

has about 50,000 characters.

To read a newspaper you would

need to know about 2,000 of them.

Chinese language

.

.

Gum is not sold in any Disney Park.

disneyland_map

.

.

The word ‘Lukewarm’ is actually a redundancy.

‘Luke’ meant ‘warm’ in Middle English

so ‘lukewarm’ technically would mean ‘warm warm’.

lukewarm

.

.

The most remote island in the world

is the uninhabited Bouvet Island

which lies somewhere between

Antarctica and Tristan de Cunha.

Bouvet Island Location

.

.

Did you know that dolphins are so smart that,

within a few weeks of captivity,

they can train people to stand on the

very edge of the pool and throw them fish?

feeding-dolphins

.

.

‘Linn’s Stamp News’ is the world’s largest

weekly newspaper for stamp collectors.

Linn's Stamp News

.

.

The little lump of flesh just forward of your ear canal,

right next to your temple, is called a ‘tragus’.

tragus

.

.

The United States has never lost a war

in which mules were used.

army mule

.

.

Will Clark of the Texas Rangers is a direct descendant

of William Clark of Lewis and Clark.

Will Clark Rangers Photocard

.

.

Running from 1972 through 1983, M*A*S*H*

was one of the most successful shows on television ever.

It won 8 Golden Globe awards,

14 Primetime Emmy awards,

the 1976 Peabody award

and was the People’s Choice winner

for Favorite TV Comedy five times.

.

.

============================================

.

It’s The Quiz Of The Week!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Welcome to another week and to another quiz.

The usual random selection of subjects and difficulties.

And if you get stuck you can find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating!

Enjoy and good luck.

.

quiz 10

.

Q.  1:  What does ‘VSOP’ stand for on a bottle of Brandy?

.

.

Q.  2:  What country has not fought in a war since 1815?

.

.

Q.  3:  What ethnic group was largely responsible for building most of the early railways in the U.S. West?

.

.

Q.  4:  What animal is the symbol of the World Wildlife Fund?

.

.

Q.  5:  Which is the only country in the world which has the Bible on its national flag?

.

.

Q.  6:  What is the total if you add the number of months with thirty-one days to the number of months that have twenty-eight days?

.

.

Q.  7:  What does the term ‘Prima Donna’ mean in Opera?

.

.

Q.  8:  What is a ‘Portuguese Man o’ War’?

.

.

Q.  9:  What color is orange blossom?

.

.

Q. 10:  People who are ‘color blind’ cab detect some colors but have difficulty distinguishing between two in particular, what are they?

.

.

Q. 11:  What is the three dimensional image created by laser beams called?

.

.

Q. 12:  Who was the first U.S. President to adopt the informal version of his first name?

.

.

Q. 13:  Organic chemistry is the study of materials that must contain which element?

.

.

Q. 14:  What famous and influential Theologian claimed he could drive away the devil with a fart?

.

.

Q. 15:  What is the liquid inside a coconut called?

.

.

Q. 16:  In which month is the ‘October Revolution’ celebrated in Russia?

.

.

Q. 17:  What are the next three prime numbers after 37?

.

.

Q. 18:  This one is the name of a flower and the colored part of the eye, what is it?

.

.

Q. 19:  What bird features in the poem, ‘The Rime of the Ancient Mariner’ by the English poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge?

.

.

Q. 20:  Named after the characters in the Tin Tin cartoon series, how many people were in the band The Thompson Twins?

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

ANSWERS

.

Q.  1:  What does ‘VSOP’ stand for on a bottle of Brandy?

A.  1:  Very Superior Old Pale.

.

.

Q.  2:  What country has not fought in a war since 1815?

A.  2:  Switzerland.

.

.

Q.  3:  What ethnic group was largely responsible for building most of the early railways in the U.S. West?

A.  3:  The Chinese.

.

.

Q.  4:  What animal is the symbol of the World Wildlife Fund?

A.  4:  Giant Panda.

.

.

Q.  5:  Which is the only country in the world which has the Bible on its national flag?

A.  5:  Dominican Republic.

.

.

Q.  6:  What is the total if you add the number of months with thirty-one days to the number of months that have twenty-eight days?

A.  6:  The answer is 19.  Seven months have 31 days (January, March, May, July, August, October and December) and of course all twelve months have 28 days!

.

.

Q.  7:  What does the term ‘Prima Donna’ mean in Opera?

A.  7:  Leading Female Opera Singer.

.

.

Q.  8:  What is a ‘Portuguese Man o’ War’?

A.  8:  It is a sea-dwelling jellyfish-like invertebrate. Strangely though, the Portuguese never had a warship called a Man o’ War, and the Portuguese name for the jellyfish-like creature is Caravela Portuguesa, referring to an earlier Portuguese sailing ship design used for exploration in the 15-16th Centuries.

.

.

Q.  9:  What color is orange blossom?

A.  9:  White.

.

.

Q. 10:  People who are ‘color blind’ cab detect some colors but have difficulty distinguishing between two in particular, what are they?

A. 10:  They are the primary colors Red & Green.

.

.

Q. 11:  What is the three dimensional image created by laser beams called?

A. 11:  A Hologram.

.

.

Q. 12:  Who was the first U.S. President to adopt the informal version of his first name?

A. 12:  Jimmy Carter.

.

.

Q. 13:  Organic chemistry is the study of materials that must contain which element?

A. 13:  Carbon.

.

.

Q. 14:  What famous and influential Theologian claimed he could drive away the devil with a fart?

A. 14:  Martin Luther.

.

.

Q. 15:  What is the liquid inside a coconut called?

A. 15:  It is called Coconut water.  (Coconut milk, popularly thought to be the liquid inside a coconut, is made from the flesh of the coconut.)

.

.

Q. 16:  In which month is the ‘October Revolution’ celebrated in Russia?

A. 16:  November. (Come on, it was never going to be that obvious!)

.

.

Q. 17:  What are the next three prime numbers after 37?

A. 17:  They are all in the forties  41,  43  and  47.

.

.

Q. 18:  This one is the name of a flower and the colored part of the eye, what is it?

A. 18:  Iris.

.

.

Q. 19:  What bird features in the poem, ‘The Rime of the Ancient Mariner’ by the English poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge?

A. 19:  An Albatross.

.

.

Q. 20:  Named after the characters in the Tin Tin cartoon series, how many people were in the band The Thompson Twins?

A. 20:  Three. Here they are….

.

.

==========================================

.

The Quiz Is Back!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

No quiz last week.

Time restraints and watching too much of the world cup in Brazil are to blame.

But not to worry, it’s back today with a vengeance with another twenty brain teasers for you.

Some easy and some quite difficult.

But remember, if you get stuck the answers can be found waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating!

Enjoy and good luck.

.

quiz confused1

.

Q.  1:  Which way does water go down the drain, clockwise or counter-clockwise?

.

.

Q.  2:  He starred along side Clint Eastwood in the 1978 movie ‘Every Which Way But Lose’ and in the 1980 sequel ‘Any Which Way You Can’ and he never said a word in either of them. Who was he?

.

.

Q.  3:  What percent of Soviet males born in 1923 didn’t survive World War II?

            a)  20%            b)  40%            c)  60%            d)  80%

.

.

Q.  4:  I’m sure just about everybody in the world has heard of the dreadful USA Patriot Act, but did you know the name was possibly the most unnecessary acronym ever devised? Five points if you can tell me what it stands for.

.

.

Q.  5:  Who was with Sir Edmund Hilary when he first climbed Mount Everest?

.

.

Q.  6:  What soccer player made headline news when he was banned from the Brazil 2014 World Cup for biting an opponent? (Bonus points if you can also name the team he played for and their opposition on that day.)

.

.

Q.  7:  On which sea does Croatia stand?

.

.

Q.  8:  What is the name of the Islamic terrorist organization currently involved in the conflict in Iraq?

.

.

Q.  9:  The famous Wimbledon tennis tournament is currently underway, but who won the Men’s and the Women’s Singles title in 2013? (A point for each correct answer.)

.

.

Q. 10:  What car company built the classic 1955 300 SLR Uhlenhaut Coupe?

.

.

Q. 11:  What were the names of the three stars of the 1966 Italian Spaghetti Western movie “The Good, The Bad And The Ugly”?

.

.

Q. 12:  What team has won the most Super Bowls?

.

.

Q. 13:  What was the name of the woman who married Adolph Hitler shortly before they both committed suicide?

.

.

Q. 14:  This one is a famous city in Brazil and the former capital city of Portugal between the years 1808 and 1821, what is it’s name?

.

.

Q. 15:  Which beats faster, a woman’s heart or a man’s?

.

.

Q. 16:  Where in California were “Doritos” invented?

.

.

Q. 17:  Now a chance to add significantly to your points score, name the seven actors who played the original western movie “The Magnificent Seven”? (Bonus points if you can also name the characters they played.)

.

.

Q. 18:  What US President’s face is on the seldom seen $100,000 bill?

.

.

Q. 19:  In what state is the Western-most point of the contiguous United States located?

.

.

Q. 20:  Who was “A Rock” and “Homeward Bound” during the 1960s?

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

ANSWERS

.

Q.  1:  Which way does water go down the drain, clockwise or counter-clockwise?

A.  1:  Counter-clockwise (unless you happen to be south of the equator).

.

.

Q.  2:  He starred along side Clint Eastwood in the 1978 movie ‘Every Which Way But Lose’ and in the 1980 sequel ‘Any Which Way You Can’ and he never said a word in either of them. Who was he?

A.  2:  His movie name was ‘Clyde’ and he was an orangutan.

.

.

Q.  3:  What percent of Soviet males born in 1923 didn’t survive World War II?

            a)  20%            b)  40%            c)  60%            d)  80%

A.  3:  The correct answer is d), approximately eighty percent of Soviet males born in 1923 didn’t survive World War II.

.

.

Q.  4:  I’m sure just about everybody in the world has heard of the dreadful USA Patriot Act, but did you know the name was possibly the most unnecessary acronym ever devised? Five points if you can tell me what it stands for.

A.  4:  USA Patriot Act stands for ‘Uniting & Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept & Obstruct Terrorism’. You see even the name is dreadful.

.

.

Q.  5:  Who was with Sir Edmund Hilary when he first climbed Mount Everest?

A.  5:  Sherpa Tensing Norgay. (You can also take a point if you just said ‘Sherpa Tensing’.)

.

.

Q.  6:  What soccer player made headline news when he was banned from the Brazil 2014 World Cup for biting an opponent? (Bonus points if you can also name the team he played for and their opposition on that day.)

A.  6:  His name is Louis Suarez and he played for Uruguay. The opposing team on that day was Italy.

.

.

Q.  7:  On which sea does Croatia stand?

A.  7:  The Adriatic sea.

.

.

Q.  8:  What is the name of the Islamic terrorist organization currently involved in the conflict in Iraq?

A.  8:  It is called ‘ISIS’.

.

.

Q.  9:  The famous Wimbledon tennis tournament is currently underway, but who won the Men’s and the Women’s Singles title in 2013? (A point for each correct answer.)

A.  9:  Andy Murray and Marion Bartoli respectively. Murray was the  first man from Great Britain to win the singles title since Fred Perry in 1936..

.

.

Q. 10:  What car company built the classic 1955 300 SLR Uhlenhaut Coupe?

A. 10:  Mercedes.

.

.

Q. 11:  What were the names of the three stars of the 1966 Italian Spaghetti Western movie “The Good, The Bad And The Ugly”?

A. 11:  They were Clint Eastwood, Lee Van Cleef, and Eli Wallach in the title roles respectively.

.

.

Q. 12:  What team has won the most Super Bowls?

A. 12:  The Pittsburgh Steelers, with six championships.

.

.

Q. 13:  What was the name of the woman who married Adolph Hitler shortly before they both committed suicide?

A. 13:  Eva Braun.

.

.

Q. 14:  This one is a famous city in Brazil and the former capital city of Portugal between the years 1808 and 1821, what is it’s name?

A. 14:  Rio de Janeiro.

.

.

Q. 15:  Which beats faster, a woman’s heart or a man’s?

A. 15:  A woman’s heart beats faster than a man’s.

.

.

Q. 16:  Where in California were “Doritos” invented?

A. 16:  Doritos were first made at the Casa de Fritos at Disneyland in Anaheim, California. Using surplus tortillas, the company-owned restaurant cut them up and fried them (as in traditional Mexican chips called totopos) and added basic seasoning, resembling the Mexican chilaquiles, but in this case being dry.

.

.

Q. 17:  Now a chance to add significantly to your points score, name the seven actors who played the original western movie “The Magnificent Seven”? (Bonus points if you can also name the characters they played.)

A. 17:  The Magnificent Seven were Yul Brynner as “Chris Adams”, Steve McQueen as “Vin”, Horst Buchholz as “Chico”, Charles Bronson as “Bernardo O’Reilly”, Robert Vaughn as “Lee”, James Coburn as “Britt”, and Brad Dexter as “Harry Luck”.

.

.

Q. 18:  What US President’s face is on the seldom seen $100,000 bill?

A. 18:  Woodrow Wilson’s face is on the $100,000 bill; these bills were mainly designed for trade between between Federal Reserve banks, but fell out of use with the invention of the wire transfer.

.

.

Q. 19:  In what state is the Western-most point of the contiguous United States located?

A. 19:  The Western-most point in the contiguous United States is located at Cape Alava, Washington.

.

.

Q. 20:  Who was “A Rock” and “Homeward Bound” during the 1960s?

A. 20:  Simon And Garfunkel.

.

.

.

=====================================================

.

Welcome To The First Fasab Quiz For June

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Welcome to Quiz Day.

Another month has appeared on the calendar. Unbelievably we’re almost half way through 2014 already!

But what better way to start the first week of another month than with another twenty brain-buster questions.

Business, politics, geography, history, nature, movies and music are all in here this week.

Let’s see how you do.

Enjoy and good luck.

.

quiz 09

.

Q.  1:  What do octopus’ and goat’s eyes have in common?

.

.

Q.  2:  What common English word comes from the French expression meaning “death pledge”?

.

.

Q.  3:  Adjusting for inflation, which of these two men is the richest man in history, John D Rockerfeller or Bill Gates?

.

.

Q.  4:  What is the term for yawning and stretching at the same time?

.

.

Q.  5:  What US President is famous for having filed a report for a UFO sighting in 1973, calling it “the darndest thing I’ve ever seen.”

.

.

Q.  6:  In the last 4000 years, how many new animals have been domesticated?

.

.

Q.  7:  What is the Greek version of the Old Testament called?

.

.

Q.  8:  Soweto is a very famous location on the outskirts of Johannesburg in South Africa, but how did it get its name?

.

.

Q.  9:  Between 1926 and 1976, John Wayne appeared in over 170 motion pictures, and became one of America’s biggest box office stars, but what was the title of his last movie?

.

.

Q. 10:  What is the only month in recorded history not to have a full moon? (Two bonus points if you can name the year too.)

.

.

Q. 11:  what was the only part of the United States that was invaded by the Japanese during WWII?

.

.

Q. 12:  Why do spiral staircases in medieval castles run clockwise?

.

.

Q. 13:  What are the only birds able to fly backwards.

.

.

Q. 14:  If you were standing in the northernmost point in the contiguous (48) US states, what state would you be standing in?

.

.

Q. 15:  Name the six main characters in the long running TV comedy series ‘The Beverly Hillbillies’? (A point for each and bonus points if you can name the actors who played them.)

.

.

Q. 16:  What is the only Canadian Province that borders the Great Lakes?

.

.

Q. 17:  Only four letters in the latin alphabet look the same if you turn them upside down or see them from behind, a point for each one you can name correctly?

.

.

Q. 18:  Previously set in Los Angeles, Washington DC and New York, what City is the location for the latest series of the hit TV show ‘24’?

.

.

Q. 19:  What is the only US State that begins with an “A” but does not end with an “A”?

.

.

Q. 20:  Who shared ‘Endless Love’ with Luther Van-Dross in 1994?

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

ANSWERS

.

Q.  1:  What do octopus’ and goat’s eyes have in common?

A.  1:  Both have rectangular pupils.

.

.

Q.  2:  What common English word comes from the French expression meaning “death pledge”?

A.  2:  The common English word ‘mortgage’ comes from the French expression meaning “death pledge”.

.

.

Q.  3:  Adjusting for inflation, which of these two men is the richest man in history, John D Rockerfeller or Bill Gates?

A.  3:  When adjusted for inflation, John D Rockerfeller is the richest man in the history of the world,  with a net worth 10 times more than Bill Gates.

.

.

Q.  4:  What is the term for yawning and stretching at the same time?

A.  4:  When you yawn and stretch at the time, you are “pandiculating.”

.

.

Q.  5:  What US President is famous for having filed a report for a UFO sighting in 1973, calling it “the darndest thing I’ve ever seen.”

A.  5:  Jimmy Carter filed a report for a UFO sighting in 1973.

.

.

Q.  6:  In the last 4000 years, how many new animals have been domesticated?

A.  6:  Bit of a trick question, in the last 4000 years, no new animals have been domesticated. Take a point if you answered ‘none’ or ‘zero’.

.

.

Q.  7:  What is the Greek version of the Old Testament called?

A.  7:  The Greek version of the Old Testament is called the ‘Septuagint’.

.

.

Q.  8:  Soweto is a very famous location on the outskirts of Johannesburg in South Africa, but how did it get its name?

A.  8:  Soweto in South Africa was derived from SOuth WEst TOwnship.

.

.

Q.  9:  Between 1926 and 1976, John Wayne appeared in over 170 motion pictures, and became one of America’s biggest box office stars, but what was the title of his last movie?

A.  9:  John Wayne’s final movie was ‘The Shootist’, made in 1976 and in which he played the part of aging former gunslinger John Bernard Books.

.

.

Q. 10:  What is the only month in recorded history not to have a full moon? (Two bonus points if you can name the year too.)

A. 10:  February 1865 is the only month in recorded history not to have a full moon.

.

.

Q. 11:  what was the only part of the United States that was invaded by the Japanese during WWII?

A. 11:  Alaska was the only part of the United States that was invaded by the Japanese during WWII. The territory was the island of Adak in the Aleutian Chain. Pearl Harbor, Hawaii was attacked, but not invaded.

.

.

Q. 12:  Why do spiral staircases in medieval castles run clockwise?

A. 12:  Spiral staircases in medieval castles run clockwise because all knights used to be right-handed and would therefore carry their swords in their right hand.

.

.

Q. 13:  What are the only birds able to fly backwards.

A. 13:  Hummingbirds are the only birds able to fly backwards.

.

.

Q. 14:  If you were standing in the northernmost point in the contiguous (48) US states, what state would you be standing in?

A. 14:  If you were standing in the northernmost point in the contiguous (48) US states, you’d be standing in Minnesota.

.

.

Q. 15:  Name the six main characters in the long running TV comedy series ‘The Beverly Hillbillies’? (A point for each and bonus points if you can name the actors who played them.)

A. 15: The characters in the Beverly Hillbillies were Jed Clampett, Granny, Ellie May, Jethro, unscrupulous banker Mr Drysdale and his long-suffering assistant Miss Hathaway, played respectively by Buddy Ebsen, Irene Ryan, Donna Douglas, Max Baer, Jr., Raymond Bailey and Nancy Kulp.

.

.

Q. 16:  What is the only Canadian Province that borders the Great Lakes?

A. 16:  Ontario is the only Canadian Province that borders the Great Lakes.

.

.

Q. 17:  Only four letters in the latin alphabet look the same if you turn them upside down or see them from behind, a point for each one you can name correctly?

A. 17:  The only letters in the latin alphabet that look the same if you turn them upside down or see them from behind are  ‘H’  ‘I’   ‘O’  and  ‘X’.

.

.

Q. 18:  Previously set in Los Angeles, Washington DC and New York, what City is the location for the latest series of the hit TV show ‘24’?

A. 18:  The latest series of ‘24’ is set in London, England.

.

.

Q. 19:  What is the only US State that begins with an “A” but does not end with an “A”?

A. 19:  Arkansas is the only US State that begins with “A” but does not end with “A”, all the other States that begin with “A”, Arizona, Alabama and Alaska, also end with “A”.

.

.

Q. 20:  Who shared ‘Endless Love’ with Luther Van-Dross in 1994?

A. 20:  Mariah Carey.

.

.

=================================================

.

It’s The Quiz Of The Week!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Hi and welcome to another week and another quiz.

Twenty more random questions to test you knowledge, some easy and some difficult, but there are a few multi-pointers in to help you with your score.

As usual the answers can be found waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating.

Enjoy and good luck.

.

quiz confused1

.

Q.  1:  How many ‘contiguous’ states are there in the United States of America?

.

.

Q.  2:  In which movie would you find the robot or cyborg known as the ‘T-800’?

.

.

Q.  3:  The 2014 Winter Olympics are being held next month (February 2014) in what country? (A bonus point is available if you can also name the City.)

.

.

Q.  4:  Where were the previous (2010) Winter Olympics held and what location has been chosen for the next Winter Olympics in 2018? (A point for each and bonus points if you can also name the Cities.)

.

.

Q.  5:  Which company built the ‘1972 911 Carrera RS’ classic automobile?

.

.

Q.  6:  In what country did the soup known as ‘Miso’ originate?

.

.

Q.  7:  Name the fictional detective associated with ‘Mrs. Hudson’.

.

.

Q.  8:  What kind of mixed drink takes its name from the Hindi or Sanskrit word for ‘five’?

.

.

Q.  9:  What is the common name for the garden flower ‘Helianthus’?

.

.

Q. 10:  ‘Thimpu’ is the capital of what country?

            a) Nepal        b) Bhutan        c) Bahrain

.

.

Q. 11:  Where was Super Bowl XLVII played on February 3, 2013?

.

.

Q. 12:  In the late 1960s and early 1970s Leonard Nimoy starred in two classic television series, what were they? (Yes, a point for each correct answer and bonus points for the names of the characters he portrayed.)

.

.

Q. 13:  ‘Rosalind’, ‘Portia’ and ‘Ophelia’ are moons of which planet?

.

.

Q. 14:  A picture of Betty Grable wearing a white bathing suit made her the most popular pin-up of which war?

            a) WWI        b) WWII        c) Korea        d) Vietnam

.

.

Q. 15:  Scandinavia is a large region of Northern Europe. What are the four mainland countries and one island nation that are generally collectively known as ‘Scandinavia’? (A point for each correct answer.)

.

.

Q. 16:  As of the end of 2013, who has won the Academy award for Best Actor the most times? (Bonus points if you can name the movies too.)

.

.

Q. 17:  What sort of creature is a whinchat?

            a) fish        b) insect        c) bird        d) mammal

.

.

Q. 18:  ‘Columbo’,  ‘Morse’,  ‘Magnum’,  ‘Bergerac’,  and  ‘Nash Bridges’ were all television detectives and policemen who had one thing in common apart from their jobs, what was it?

.

.

Q. 19:  With one word complete the following Acme Corporation inventions in ‘The Roadrunner’.

           a) dehydrated  _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _    and, b) portable  _ _ _ _ _

.

.

Q. 20:  Released in 1954, a single by Bill Haley & His Comets became one of the best selling songs of all time with sales of 25 million. What was it?      

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

ANSWERS

.

Q.  1:  How many ‘contiguous’ states are there in the United States of America?

A.  1:  48.

.

.

Q.  2:  In which movie would you find the robot or cyborg known as the ‘T-800’?

A.  2:  Terminator.

.

.

Q.  3:  The 2014 Winter Olympics are being held next month (February 2014) in what country? (A bonus point is available if you can also name the City.)

A.  3:  The 2014 XXII Winter Olympics will be held in Sochi, Russia.

.

.

Q.  4:  Where were the previous (2010) Winter Olympics held and what location has been chosen for the next Winter Olympics in 2018? (A point for each and bonus points if you can also name the Cities.)

A.  4:  Vancouver, Canada in 2010 and Pyeongchang, South Korea in 2018.

.

.

Q.  5:  Which company built the ‘1972 911 Carrera RS’ classic automobile?

A.  5:  Porsche.

.

.

Q.  6:  In what country did the soup known as ‘Miso’ originate?

A.  6:  Japan.

.

.

Q.  7:  Name the fictional detective associated with ‘Mrs. Hudson’.

A.  7:  Sherlock Holmes.

.

.

Q.  8:  What kind of mixed drink takes its name from the Hindi or Sanskrit word for ‘five’?

A.  8:  Punch.

.

.

Q.  9:  What is the common name for the garden flower ‘Helianthus’?

A.  9:  Sunflower.

.

.

Q. 10:  ‘Thimpu’ is the capital of what country?

            a) Nepal        b) Bhutan        c) Bahrain

A. 10:  b) Bhutan.

.

.

Q. 11:  Where was Super Bowl XLVII played on February 3, 2013?

A. 11:  At the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana.

.

.

Q. 12:  In the late 1960s and early 1970s Leonard Nimoy starred in two classic television series, what were they? (Yes, a point for each correct answer and bonus points for the names of the characters he portrayed.)

A. 12:  Mr. Spock in Star Trek (1966-1969, 79 episodes) and Paris in Mission Impossible (1969-1971, 49 episodes).

.

.

Q. 13:  ‘Rosalind’, ‘Portia’ and ‘Ophelia’ are moons of which planet?

A. 13:  Uranus.

.

.

Q. 14:  A picture of Betty Grable wearing a white bathing suit made her the most popular pin-up of which war?

            a) WWI        b) WWII        c) Korea        d) Vietnam

A. 14:  b) WWII

.

.

Q. 15:  Scandinavia is a large region of Northern Europe. What are the four mainland countries and one island nation that are generally collectively known as ‘Scandinavia’? (A point for each correct answer.)

A. 15:  Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, and Iceland.

.

.

Q. 16:  As of the end of 2013, who has won the Academy award for Best Actor the most times? (Bonus points if you can name the movies too.)

A. 16:  Daniel Day-Lewis. (In 1990 for ‘My Left Foot’, in 2008 for ‘There Will Be Blood’, and in 2013 for ‘Lincoln’.)

.

.

Q. 17:  What sort of creature is a whinchat?

            a) fish        b) insect        c) bird        d) mammal

A. 17:  c) bird.

.

.

Q. 18:  ‘Columbo’,  ‘Morse’,  ‘Magnum’,  ‘Bergerac’,  and  ‘Nash Bridges’ were all television detectives and policemen who had one thing in common apart from their jobs, what was it?

A. 18:  They all drove classic or distinctive cars.

.

.

Q. 19:  With one word complete the following Acme Corporation inventions in ‘The Roadrunner’.

           a) dehydrated  _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _    and, b) portable  _ _ _ _ _

A. 19:  a) dehydrated boulders   and, b) portable holes

.

.

Q. 20:  Released in 1954, a single by Bill Haley & His Comets became one of the best selling songs of all time with sales of 25 million. What was it?      

A. 20: “Rock Around the Clock”

.

.

==========================================

.