Liar, Liar, Pants On Fire – Some Hot Facts!

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

We’ll get to one of the biggest liars America has produced later.

But ahead of that have a look at another selection of fasab facts.

And…

Enjoy.

.

cartoon leader of the leader of the free world

.

There is a lake in Australia called Lake Hillier

that is a bright shade of pink.

Unlike with other similar lakes,

scientists are still not completely sure why.

Lake Hillier Australia

.

.

Bill Nye the Science Guy

originally wanted to be an astronaut,

but NASA kept rejecting him.

Bill Nye the Science Guy

.

.

In 476 AD the Western Roman Empire fell

and the Eastern Empire survived

as what we know today as the Byzantine Empire.

Byzantine Empire map

.

.

Charlie Chaplin once lost a

Charlie Chaplin look-alike contest

Charlie Chaplin

.

.

Although there have been emails floating about

for years containing many false facts about

Abraham Lincoln and John F. Kennedy,

there were a few that are true and interesting.

Lincoln was elected to congress in 1846,

Kennedy in 1946.

Lincoln became president in 1860,

Kennedy in 1960 (though sworn in 1961).

And both were eventually shot in the head on a Friday.

Abraham Lincoln and John F. Kennedy

.

.

Inca mail was delivered along their network of roads

by way of messengers who would hand mail off

to each other using a sort of relay system.

A bit like the Pony Express without the ponies!

Inca mail

.

.

1% of the world’s population

eats at McDonalds every day.

McDonalds meal

.

.

Named by a Japanese scientist after

a 3rd-century Japanese shaman queen, Himiko,

is a giant gas cloud and one of the largest

objects ever found in space.

With a length of about 55,000 light years,

the cloud is roughly the equivalent

mass of 40 billion Suns.

3rd-century Japanese shaman queen, Himiko

.

.

The top ten feet of the oceans

holds the same amount of heat

as the entire atmosphere

ocean

.

.

In the early 20th century, scientists thought

our nerves transmitted information electrically.

After a dream, Dr. Otto Loewi awoke during the night

and scribbled some thoughts on a paper.

Upon waking in the morning,

he realized  he had written about information

being transmitted chemically,

later proven to be true and

winning him the Nobel Prize in 1936.

Dr. Otto Loewi

.

.

Justinian was the last emperor

to use the title ‘Caesar’.

Justinian

.

.

A liar tends not to use contractions.

For example, “I didn’t do it”

statistically tends to be a more truthful

statement that “I did not do it”.

Remember Bill Clinton,

he didn’t say, “I didn’t do it”,

he said,

“I did not have sexual relations with that woman.”

He lied.

.

.

.

============================

.

America, Asia and Australia – It’s A Global Quiz.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Questions relating to most continents today so truly a global quiz.

Twenty more questions to test your general knowledge.

As always if you get stuck you can find the answers waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay down below, but please NO cheating.

Enjoy and good luck.

.

quiz7

.

Q.  1.  In Australia are there are more people than kangaroos or more kangaroos than people?

.

.

Q.  2.  In America what commemoration day was in honor of the Union and Confederate soldiers fallen in the American Civil War, and known as the Decoration Day?

.

.

Q.  3.  To be officially considered an astronaut by NASA you must travel how many miles above the surface of the Earth?

            a) 50 miles           b) 100 miles           c) 150 miles           d) 200 miles

.

.

Q.  4.  In 755 AD the An Lushan rebellion in which over 30 million people died (almost a sixth of the world population) occurred in what country?

.

.

Q.  5.  On what part of your body would you find Rasceta?

.

.

Q.  6.  What is a young rabbit called?

.

.

Q.  7.  What is the most translated book in the world, available in 2454 languages?

.

.

Q.  8.  Approximately what proportion of the Earth is covered by the Pacific Ocean?

            a) one eighth          b) one fifth          c) one quarter          d) one third

.

.

Q.  9.  In what year (excluding test flights) was the first Space Shuttle launched?

.

.

Q. 10.  In what year (excluding test flights) was the last Space Shuttle launched?

.

.

Q. 11.  What city is known as the ‘Pearl of the Danube’ ?

.

.

Q. 12.  What is measured on the Beaufort scale?

.

.

Q. 13.  What English naval commander reputedly refused to stop a game of bowls when an enemy fleet was sighted?

.

.

Q. 14.  What famous novelists works include ‘Brighton Rock’, ‘The Quiet American’, and ‘Our Man In Havana’ ?

.

.

Q. 15.  Which two figures are normally found in a Pietà sculpture?

.

.

Q. 16.  What are the three main functions in trigonometry?

.

.

Q. 17.  What word links a castle and court associated with the legendary King Arthur and the presidency of JFK?

.

.

Q. 18.  Who did Cassius Clay first defeat to win the boxing Heavyweight Championship of the World?

.

.

Q. 19.  What are the 12 long triangles on a backgammon board called?

.

.

Q. 20. In music what band is known by the acronym ELO?

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

ANSWERS

.

Q.  1.  In Australia are there are more people than kangaroos or more kangaroos than people?

A.  1.  In Australia there are approximately 23.87 million people, but current Federal Government estimates puts the number of kangaroos at 50 – 60 million.

.

.

Q.  2.  In America what commemoration day was in honor of the Union and Confederate soldiers fallen in the American Civil War, and known as the Decoration Day?

A.  2. Memorial Day.

.

.

Q.  3.  To be officially considered an astronaut by NASA you must travel how many miles above the surface of the Earth?

            a) 50 miles           b) 100 miles           c) 150 miles           d) 200 miles

A.  3.  The correct answer is a) 50 miles.

.

.

Q.  4.  In 755 AD the An Lushan rebellion in which over 30 million people died (almost a sixth of the world population) occurred in what country?

A.  4.  In China.

.

.

Q.  5.  On what part of your body would you find Rasceta?

A.  5.  The lines on the back of your wrist are called Rasceta.

.

.

Q.  6.  What is a young rabbit called?

A.  6.  A young rabbit is called a ‘kitten’ or a ‘kit’, not a bunny.

.

.

Q.  7.  What is the most translated book in the world, available in 2454 languages?

A.  7.  The Bible.

.

.

Q.  8.  Approximately what proportion of the Earth is covered by the Pacific Ocean?

            a) one eighth          b) one fifth          c) one quarter          d) one third

A.  8.  The correct answer is d) one third.

.

.

Q.  9.  In what year (excluding test flights) was the first Space Shuttle launched?

A.  9.  It was launched in 1981, on April 12th.

.

.

Q. 10.  In what year (excluding test flights) was the last Space Shuttle launched?

A. 10.  It was launched in 2011, on July 8th.

.

.

Q. 11.  What city is known as the ‘Pearl of the Danube’ ?

A. 11.  Budapest.

.

.

Q. 12.  What is measured on the Beaufort scale?

A. 12.  Wind speed. It’s full name is the Beaufort wind force scale, although it is a measure of wind speed and not of force in the scientific sense.

.

.

Q. 13.  What English naval commander reputedly refused to stop a game of bowls when an enemy fleet was sighted?

A. 13.  Sir Francis Drake.

.

.

Q. 14.  What famous novelists works include ‘Brighton Rock’, ‘The Quiet American’, and ‘Our Man In Havana’ ?

A. 14.  Graham Greene.

.

.

Q. 15.  Which two figures are normally found in a Pietà sculpture?

A. 15.  The Pietà sculpture depicts the body of Jesus on the lap of his mother Mary after the Crucifixion.

.

.

Q. 16.  What are the three main functions in trigonometry?

A. 16.  They are ‘Sine’, ‘Cosine’ and ‘Tangent’, often shortened to ‘sin’, ‘cos’ and ‘tan’.

.

.

Q. 17.  What word links a castle and court associated with the legendary King Arthur and the presidency of JFK?

A. 17.  Camelot.

.

.

Q. 18.  Who did Cassius Clay first defeat to win the boxing Heavyweight Championship of the World?

A. 18.  Sonny Liston.

.

.

Q. 19.  What are the 12 long triangles on a backgammon board called?

A. 19.  They are known as ‘Points’.

.

.

Q. 20. In music what band is known by the acronym ELO?

A. 20.  The Electric Light Orchestra.

.

.

=======================================

.

It’s March 17th So Some Facts About Saint Patrick Today.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

march 17 st patrick's day

.

Happy Saint Patrick’s Day to one and all who celebrate these things.

Grab a glass of your green beer and find out a few facts about St. Patrick that you may find interesting and a little surprising.

Enjoy.

.

donald duck st patrick's day

.

Let’s start with this fact,

Saint Patrick wasn’t Irish

and he wasn’t born in Ireland.

Although he is remembered for introducing

Christianity to Ireland in the year 432, Patrick was

born to Roman parents in Scotland or Wales in

the late fourth century (about 385 AD)

so actually he’s British!

 

British Order of St Patrick
British Order of St Patrick

.

.

And while we are doing a bit of myth-busting,

you might as well also know that the

Shamrock is not the symbol of Ireland.

It is a popular Irish symbol,

but the symbol of Ireland is the Harp.

As early as the medieval period, the harp appeared

on Irish gravestones and manuscripts and was

popular in Irish legend and culture well before that.

King Henry VIII used the harp on coins as early as 1534.

Later, it was used on Irish flags and Irish coats of arms.

Starting in 1642 the harp also appeared on flags

during rebellions against English rule and when

Ireland became an independent country in 1921,

it adopted the harp as the national symbol.

Harp national symbol of Ireland
The Harp is the national symbol of Ireland.

.

.

Although today many people claim that

the shamrock represents faith, hope, and love,

or any number of other things,

it was actually used by Patrick to teach

the mystery of the Holy Trinity,

and how three things,

the Father, The Son, and the Holy Spirit

could be separate entities, yet one in the same.

Obviously, the pagan rulers of Ireland found

Patrick to be convincing because they

quickly converted to Christianity.

 Holy-Trinity-Shamrock

.

.

Patrick’s first introduction to the Irish was not a pleasant one.

At the age of 16, he had the misfortune of

being kidnapped by Irish raiders who took him away

and sold him as a slave.

He spent several years in Ireland herding sheep

and learning about the people there.

At the age of 22, he managed to escape and

made his way to a monastery in England where

he spent 12 years growing closer to God.

 (St) Patrick being given the opportunity to leave Ireland where he had been held as a slave

.

.

The original color associated with St. Patrick is blue,

not green as commonly believed.

In several artworks depicting the saint,

he is shown wearing blue vestments.

King Henry VIII used the Irish harp in gold

on a blue flag to represent the country.

Since that time, and possibly before,

blue has been a popular color to represent

the country on flags, coats-of-arms,

and even sports jerseys.

Ireland’s association with the color green

came later, presumably because of the greenness

of the countryside, caused by endless rainfall.

Today, the country is also referred to as the “Emerald Isle.”

 saint patrick color blue

.

.

The St. Patrick‘s Day parade was invented

in the United States, not Ireland.

On March 17, 1762, Irish soldiers serving in the British army

marched through New York City, the parade and accompanying

music helping the soldiers celebrate their Irish roots,

as well as reconnect with fellow Irishmen

serving in the British army.

In 1848, several New York Irish Aid societies united

their parades to form one official New York City

St. Patrick’s Day Parade which has become one of the

largest St Patrick’s parades with about 200,000

participants and 3 million onlookers.

It is also the oldest civilian parade in the United States.

Only the City of Boston rivals it.

 st patrick's day parade new york city

.

.

By contrast, the world’s shortest St. Patrick’s Day

parade is in Dripsey, Cork, where the

parade lasts just 100 yards and

travels between the village’s two pubs.

 St. Patrick’s Day parade Dripsey Cork

.

.

And only the Irish know why this parade goes from

one pub to the other because until 1970 St. Patrick’s

was what was known as a dry holiday in Ireland,

meaning that all pubs were shut down for the day.

The law was overturned in 1970, when St. Patrick’s

was reclassified as a national holiday

– cheers to that!

 green-beer

.

.

In the United States during the mid 19th century,

the Roman Catholic Irish faced discrimination

much like that faced by African Americans.

Unlike the Protestant Irish who quickly assimilated

into their new country and became Americans,

(their descendants now number many millions in the USA),

the Roman Catholic Irish clung to their religion and culture

and were perceived as a potentially disloyal.

To combat this, they began to organize themselves politically

and by the end of the 19th century, St. Patrick’s Day was

a large holiday for the Roman Catholic Irish and an occasion

for them to demonstrate their collective political and social might.

In more recent times the political emphasis has faded along with

the discrimination, and the holiday has now become popular as an

opportunity for festivity regardless of one’s cultural background.

 St. Patrick’s Day parade new york roman catholic irish

.

.

The New York and Boston St. Patrick’s Day celebrations

may well be impressive in their own right,

but they have a rival.

St Patrick’s Day has twice been celebrated in space.

In 2011, the International Space Station hosted

a St. Paddy’s Day celebration with Irish-American

astronaut Catherine Coleman playing a hundred-year-old flute

and a tin whistle belonging to members

of the Irish group, the Chieftains,

while floating weightlessly in space.

Coleman’s performance was included in a track entitled

”The Chieftains In Orbit” on the group’s album, ‘Voice of Ages’.

And in 2013, astronaut, Chris Hadfield, celebrated

St Patrick’s Day by photographing Ireland from

space while singing Danny Boy.

.

.

=====================================

.

 

Let’s Not Have A Barney About These Facts.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Hi, and welcome to the fasab blog.

Today is fact day with another random selection of hopefully interesting things to learn.

Enjoy

.

did you know1

.

In gangster slang, a boxing match

that is fixed is called a ‘barney’.

boxers

.

.

In 2009, one of the twelve surviving copies of

Edgar Allen Poe’s first book ‘Tamerlane and Other Poems’

was sold at Christie’s Auction House for $662,500,

a record price paid for a work of American literature.

Tamerlane and Other Poems

.

.

 

Isaac Smith was a commissioned officer in

the Royal Navy and the cousin of Captain Cook,

with whom he explored the then-New World.

Smith also became the first European to arrive in eastern Australia

and the first man to create survey maps of various Pacific islands and coastlines,

including Tierra del Fuego in South America.

Despite all his pioneering in the world of exploration

he is best remembered as the last survivor

of James Cook’s first voyage in the South Pacific Ocean

aboard the HMS Endeavour, from 1768 to 1771.

Midshipman_Isaac_Smith

.

.

Research suggests that dark chocolate boosts memory,

attention span, reaction time, and problem-solving skills

by increasing blood flow to the brain.

Dark chocolate can also improve the ability

to see in low-contrast situations (such as poor weather)

and promote lower blood pressure.

Yum!

dark chocolate

.

.

On average, 35 meters of hair fiber

is produced on the adult scalp.

Really???

shaved_head

.

.

Ant colonies range greatly in size from

a few dozen individuals to many millions of ants.

The largest ant colonies are called ‘supercolonies’ that create

giant ant hills sometimes thousands of miles long.

The largest supercolony covers over 3,700 miles,

and has over 1 billion ants.

african_ant_hill

.

.

Most toilets flush in E flat.

toilet

.

.

The largest building in the world by volume

is The Boeing Everett Factory, in Everett, Washington,

which was originally built for the construction of the Boeing 747.

It has a volume of 472,370,319 cubic feet (1.7495e+7yd³)

and an area of almost 100 acres (40 ha 4685.6m2).

The Boeing Everett Factory

.

.

Oak trees can live 200 years or more.

angel-oak-tree-l

.

.

Astronaut John Glenn is a decorated World War II veteran,

one of the first American astronauts in history,

and one of the epic Mercury Seven.

Glenn was also the first American astronaut to orbit the Earth

and the fifth astronaut in history to go into space.

At the age of 93 he’s the last remaining astronaut of the Mercury Seven

and one of the very few surviving astronauts (American or Soviet)

of the Space Age that began in the late 1950s.

John Glenn

.

.

A less successful astronaut was a Chinese man called Wan Hu,

a sixteenth-century local government official during the Ming Dynasty,

who had ambitions to travel to the Moon by means of a

special chair he designed with 47 attached rockets.

After lighting the rockets,

instead of shooting the ambitious government official into the air,

the rockets exploded, killing him.

Wan Hu

.

.

When Pluto was first located by Clyde Tombaugh in 1930

it was just given the generic name Planet X.

It was named ‘Pluto’ by an 11-year-old girl,

Venetia Burney of Oxford, England.

Venetia Burney of Oxford, England

.

.

Want somewhere quiet to eat?

Then try Nicholas Nauman’s restaurant called ‘Eat’

in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, New York,

which features nothing special except for the fact

that you cannot speak while dining there.

Apparently it was inspired by his life-changing stay

at a Buddhist monastery in India,

which made him want to create a place

where people could enjoy silence.

The silent dinners became so popular that nowadays,

people have to book their tables in advance.

restaurant called ‘Eat’

.

.

The first toilet stall in a public washroom is the least likely to be used

and therefore also likely to be the cleanest.

first toilet stall in a public washroom

.

.

The character of Michael Myers

was named after the European distributor of

John Carpenter’s previous film,

Assault on Precinct 13,

and apparently this was the director’s way of

saying a kind of weird “thank you” for the

film’s incredible success throughout most of Europe.

Michael_Myers

.

===================================

.

Did You Know? – Here Are Some More Things You Probably Didn’t.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

Welcome to another fact finding day on the fasab blog.

Fifteen more very random but hopefully interesting facts that you probably didn’t know.

Enjoy.

.

did you know4

.

If you live in France,

and happen to own a pig,

it is illegal to name it ‘Napoleon’.

pig Napoleon

.

.

50 of the 83 restaurants

featured on Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares

have been sold or shut down.

ramsays-kitchen-nightmares

.

.

In Turkey, it is illegal for a man

over 80 years old to become a pilot.

pilot turkey

.

.

It took 127 beers to make Andre The Giant

pass out in a hotel lobby;

 he was so big, hotel management couldn’t

move him and left him there until the next day.

Andres-Hand-beer

.

.

If you have the plague you are not

permitted to flag down a taxi in London.

London taxi

.

.

If a set of identical twin women

married a set of identical twin men

and subsequently had children,

their kids would genetically be siblings.

nicoleandjaqueline

.

.

Every year Louis Vuitton burns

all of its unsold stock of bags.

Louis_Vuitton_Speedy_Hand_Bags

.

.

It is against the law in Barbados to wear any camouflage clothing,

but, hey, if it’s good enough whose going to notice?

bushgreen camouflage

.

.

Sean Connery wore a wig in every

one of his Bond performances.

Sean Connery James Bond

.

.

Whilst chewing gum in Singapore is not illegal,

importing it, or selling it,

or spitting it on to the pavement definitely is.

Singapore gum sign

.

.

Peter Sellers was paid $1 million for his

part in the movie Dr. Strangelove,

55 percent of the film’s budget.

peter-sellers-as-dr-strangelove

.

.

In Canada stores are not

legally required to accept coins

Canadian-Specimen-Set-Coins

.

.

The United Arab Emirates donated a laptop

to every high school student in Joplin, Missouri,

after the city had been devastated by a tornado.

Joplin, Missouri after tornado

.

.

Astronaut Pete Conrad’s first sentence on the moon was

“Oooh, is that soft an queasy”,

said in order to win a $500 bet.

pete conrad

.

.

And speaking of the Moon,

the Moonwalk predates Michael Jackson by at least 50 years,

having been performed by James Brown, David Bowie,

Dick Van Dyke and Cab Calloway.

(MJ is still the best at it though.)

.

.

.

===========================================

.

Did You Know? It’s Fascinating Fact day.

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

It’s another “Did You Know” day on the fasab blog.

More random facts to get your head around.

Enjoy.

.

did you know4

.

The first Dunkin Donuts and the first Howard Johnson’s

were both in Quincy, Massachusetts.

Dunkin Donuts

.

.

The Pennsylvania Dutch are not really Dutch.

They are a people of German ancestry living in

southeastern Pennsylvania, primarily in Lancaster County.

“German” in German is “Deutsch.”

Pennsylvania Dutch

.

.

The Gateway Arch in St. Louis

is as wide at its base as it is tall (630 feet).

Gateway Arch dimensions

.

.

Ohio State offers a course called “Sports for the Spectator.”

Students are taught how to be

“an informed and appreciative sports spectator.”

obama-ohio-state-2

.

.

Telephone cards first took off in Hawaii,

since long-distance charges from the far-flung state

were higher than anywhere else in the country.

prepaid-phone-cards

.

.

What day were you born on?

Apparently Tuesday is the most popular day of the week for giving birth,

a fact that has nothing to do with Nature

and everything to do with hospital staffing;

elective C-sections and induced labors

are often scheduled during traditional working hours.

Calendar

.

.

The majority of the text in the Monroe Doctrine

was actually penned by John Quincy Adams.

The Monroe Doctrine

.

.

Despite its reputation as a cosmonaut staple,

freeze-dried ice cream only made one mission to space.

In 1968, it provided instant sugar rushes to the astronauts of Apollo 7.

astronaut_icecream

.

.

In car design circles, a hood ornament is properly called a “mascot.”

The first American automobile to sport a mascot was the 1912 Cadillac.

1912_Cadillac

.

.

Albert Einstein never received a Nobel Prize

for his theory of relativity.

Pigeon Books Albert Einstein Relativity

.

.

On November 18th, 1913, pilot Lincoln Beachey was the

first person to make a complete loop-de-loop in an airplane.

Lincoln_Beachey_in_his_plane

.

.

The first man to appear on the cover of Playboy

was the actor Peter Sellers.

sellers_playboy_cover_april_64

.

.

West Virginia is no longer the coal-mining capital of the U.S.,

nine of the ten top-producing coal mines are currently located in Wyoming.

open cast coal mine

.

.

The popular game Bingo was originally called “Beano”

because players used beans to cover the numbered squares.

Bingo

.

.

Cruise control and automatic transmissions were invented

by a blind engineer named Ralph Teetor.

Ralph Teetor

.

.

Modern scholars believe that Jericho,

settled around 10,000 years ago,

was the first walled city in the world.

jericho_walls_wide_view

.

.

The human bone most often broken is the clavicle (collar bone).

clavicle

.

.

Swearing to tell

“the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth”

dates back to English Common Law.

Interestingly enough, there were no penalties for perjury until the 1600s;

prior to that time, it was believed that the fear of God’s wrath

was enough to keep witnesses honest.

The truth the whole truth

.

.

According to doctors, humans have an average

of 14 episodes of flatulence per day.

(I always knew I was above average!)

humorous-fish-farting-animation-flatulence-comedy-animated-picture

.

.

The Harlem Globetotters were originally a Chicago based team (1927).

They did not play a game in Harlem until the 1960s.

.

.

=======================================

.

Maybe We Should Rename Monday As Quiz Day?

“Fight Against Stupidity And Bureaucracy”

.

There, you have had the first question in the title. So should we?

If that one is too easy try this random selection of questions. As usual there are some easy, some tricky, but most of them difficult enough, unless you know the answers, of course!.

And just in case you don’t know some of the answers, they are, as ever, given waaaaaaaaaaay down below.

But NO cheating please!

Enjoy.

.

quiz 2

.

Q  1:  Who was originally called “Happy Rabbit”?

.

.

Q  2:  In Italy who is known by the name Babbo Natale?

.

.

Q  3:  What did Thailand used to be called?

.

.

Q  4:  Until 1796, there was a state in the United States called Franklin. Today it is known as what?

.

.

Q  5:  What is the only nation whose name begins with an “A” but doesn’t end in an “A”?

(Hint: you have heard about this place a LOT)

.

.

Q  6:  Astronaut Neil Armstrong was the first man who stepped on the moon, but which foot landed first?

.

.

Q  7:  What is the only domestic animal not mentioned in the Bible?

.

.

Q  8:  What is the only muscle in your body that is attached at only one end?

.

.

Q  9:  A group of rhinos is called what?

.

.

Q 10:  What is the most popular first name in the world?

.

.

Q 11:  What city stands on about 120 small islands?

.

.

Q 12:  What is Barbie’s full name?

.

.

Q 13:  Which is bigger, England or the US state of Florida?

.

.

Q 14:  What are the United State’s only mobile National Monuments?

.

.

Q 15:  Who was the only unmarried president of the US?

.

.

Q 16:  In the 1940’s, what changed its name from Bich for fear that Americans would pronounce it ‘Bitch.’

.

.

Q 17:  What is the only country in the world where windmills turn clockwise?

.

.

Q 18:  What is the only movie to have its sequel released the same year (1933)?

.

.

Q 19:  In humans it is called an epidemic, but what is it called when it affects animals?

.

.

Q 20:  The Don McLean song, “American Pie” was named after what?

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

>

ANSWERS

.

Q  1:  Who was originally called “Happy Rabbit”?

A  1:  Bugs Bunny

.

.

Q  2:  In Italy who is known by the name Babbo Natale?

A  2:  Santa Claus

.

.

Q  3:  What did Thailand used to be called?

A  3:  Siam

.

.

Q  4:  Until 1796, there was a state in the United States called Franklin. Today it is known as what?

A  4:  Tennessee

.

.

Q  5:  What is the only nation whose name begins with an “A” but doesn’t end in an “A”?

(Hint: you have heard about this place a LOT)

A  5:  Afghanistan

.

.

Q  6:  Astronaut Neil Armstrong was the first man who stepped on the moon, but which foot landed first?

A  6:  His left foot

.

.

Q  7:  What is the only domestic animal not mentioned in the Bible?

A  7:  The cat

.

.

Q  8:  What is the only muscle in your body that is attached at only one end?

A  8:  Your tongue

.

.

Q  9:  A group of rhinos is called what?

A  9:  A crash

.

.

Q 10:  What is the most popular first name in the world?

A 10:  Muhammad

.

.

Q 11:  What city stands on about 120 small islands?

A 11:  Venice

.

.

Q 12:  What is Barbie’s full name?

A 12:  “Babara Millicent Roberts.”

.

.

Q 13:  Which is bigger, England or the US state of Florida?

A 13:  The state of Florida

.

.

Q 14:  What are the United State’s only mobile National Monuments?

A 14:  The San Francisco Cable cars

.

.

Q 15:  Who was the only unmarried president of the US?

A 15:  James Buchanan

.

.

Q 16:  In the 1940’s, what changed its name from Bich for fear that Americans would pronounce it ‘Bitch.’

A 16:  The “Bic” pen

.

.

Q 17:  What is the only country in the world where windmills turn clockwise?

A 17:  Ireland

.

.

Q 18:  What is the only movie to have its sequel released the same year (1933)?

A 18:  “King Kong” and “Son Of Kong”

.

.

Q 19:  In humans it is called an epidemic, but what is it called when it affects animals?

A 19:  An epizootic

.

.

Q 20:  The Don McLean song, “American Pie” was named after what?

A 20:  The airplane Buddy Holly died in was the “American Pie.”

.

===========================================

.